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BLUE WHALE SOLUTIONS, VELACHERY, CHENNAI

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Consumer complaints and reviews about BLUE WHALE SOLUTIONS, VELACHERY, CHENNAI

jazmez67
 
Apr 22, 2015

The U.S. Software and IT Services Industry

The U.S. Software and IT Services Industry



United States has the most advanced software and information technology services industry in the world.

The industry has increased its revenue by an average of six percent between 2010 and 2011, totaling $606 billion in 2011. Overall, research and development spending in the United States information and communications technology (ICT) sectors increased by 6.3 percent to $126.3 billion in 2011. The United States accounts for more than 55 percent of global ICT research and development.

There are more than 100,000 software and information technology (IT) services companies in the United States, and more than 99 percent are small and medium-sized firms (i.e., under 500 employees). This total includes software publishers, suppliers of custom computer programming services, computer systems design firms, and facilities management companies. The industry draws on a highly educated and skilled U.S. workforce of nearly two million people, a number which has continued to grow during the past decade.

U.S. software firms operate in a mature, harmonized market and have a reputation for producing reliable and effective solutions that accelerate quickly to the marketplace. International companies in the industry have shown a keen interest in the U.S. market because of its strong intellectual property rights laws and enforcement. U.S. companies lead the world’s packaged- and custom-software markets, and are competitive in nearly all other market segments with a relatively stable overseas market share.

The International Data Corporation (IDC) estimates that U.S. demand for software will increase more than 7 percent to $163.9 billion in 2012, and that demand for information technology services will rise 4.2 percent to $235.6 billion from the previous year. IDC surveys show that infrastructure projects are high priorities for U.S. businesses, and interest is growing rapidly in collaborative tools, green information technology, cloud computing and mobile applications.

Industry Subsectors

Cloud Computing Services: The IDC expects that global revenue from public cloud computing services will grow four times as fast as information technology spending generally, increasing by 27.6 percent year-on-year from $21 billion in 2010 to more than $76 billion in 2015. The U.S. market currently represents about half of this demand, and U.S. companies routinely dominate the annual rankings of cloud services providers. Software vendors and developers will benefit from this expansion as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) products are hosted on clouds.

Entertainment Software: Combined revenues in entertainment software from computer and video games expanded by 10 percent from 2005 to 2009 to $10.5 billion. The subsector employs more than 120,000 people directly and indirectly.

Electronic Commerce: Use of the Internet for selling and buying retail products continue to expand across the globe at an exciting pace. The United States is a leader in electronic commerce or “e-commerce”. According to statistics compiled by Census, U.S. retail e-commerce spending for 2011 reached $195 billion.
jazmez67
 
Apr 22, 2015

IT Infrastrucutre

The U.S. Software and IT Services Industry



United States has the most advanced software and information technology services industry in the world.

The industry has increased its revenue by an average of six percent between 2010 and 2011, totaling $606 billion in 2011. Overall, research and development spending in the United States information and communications technology (ICT) sectors increased by 6.3 percent to $126.3 billion in 2011. The United States accounts for more than 55 percent of global ICT research and development.

There are more than 100,000 software and information technology (IT) services companies in the United States, and more than 99 percent are small and medium-sized firms (i.e., under 500 employees). This total includes software publishers, suppliers of custom computer programming services, computer systems design firms, and facilities management companies. The industry draws on a highly educated and skilled U.S. workforce of nearly two million people, a number which has continued to grow during the past decade.

U.S. software firms operate in a mature, harmonized market and have a reputation for producing reliable and effective solutions that accelerate quickly to the marketplace. International companies in the industry have shown a keen interest in the U.S. market because of its strong intellectual property rights laws and enforcement. U.S. companies lead the world’s packaged- and custom-software markets, and are competitive in nearly all other market segments with a relatively stable overseas market share.

The International Data Corporation (IDC) estimates that U.S. demand for software will increase more than 7 percent to $163.9 billion in 2012, and that demand for information technology services will rise 4.2 percent to $235.6 billion from the previous year. IDC surveys show that infrastructure projects are high priorities for U.S. businesses, and interest is growing rapidly in collaborative tools, green information technology, cloud computing and mobile applications.

Industry Subsectors

Cloud Computing Services: The IDC expects that global revenue from public cloud computing services will grow four times as fast as information technology spending generally, increasing by 27.6 percent year-on-year from $21 billion in 2010 to more than $76 billion in 2015. The U.S. market currently represents about half of this demand, and U.S. companies routinely dominate the annual rankings of cloud services providers. Software vendors and developers will benefit from this expansion as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) products are hosted on clouds.

Entertainment Software: Combined revenues in entertainment software from computer and video games expanded by 10 percent from 2005 to 2009 to $10.5 billion. The subsector employs more than 120,000 people directly and indirectly.

Electronic Commerce: Use of the Internet for selling and buying retail products continue to expand across the globe at an exciting pace. The United States is a leader in electronic commerce or “e-commerce”. According to statistics compiled by Census, U.S. retail e-commerce spending for 2011 reached $195 billion.
krishna_kumarp
 
Jan 22, 2015

"Blue Whale Solutions" Fraud company

Dear colleagues and candidates,
I am sending this information’s to all new fresh colleagues and candidates about this "Blue Whale Solutions" Fraud company
They are called Walkin interview in Chennai 20th to 26th January 2015, Qualification MCA,ME, M.Tech, BE, MSc. Etc..
Offering salary is below
Deposit in the company -10,000 RS (never get this deposit)
3 month no salary
After 3 month salary 6,000 RS ( this salary also not get as per other complaint)

originally this company name is "Openwire Solutions", a software firm at Velachery, Chennai. new name is "Blue Whale Solutions"
please find below old HR manager letter from the web about this company.


I'm Suba Anandhan, former HR of Openwire Solutions, a software firm at Velachery, Chennai. I'm writing this on behalf of my colleagues and candidates who got an offer from Openwire and willing to join them. This is not a company at all, this is just a 3 bedroom flat with 9-10 computers. No proper management, no salary, no delivery, nothing!! They get payments from the Client and deliver nothing. Please google "Openwire Solutions Complaints" and you can see lot more reviews about this firm.

Since I was in the HR department, I know very well about this firm. I know them in & out. Damn poor management. The owner of this firm doesn't know anything about software development and he speaks all bull shit!! They have 3-4 US numbers starting with (703), it's a magic jack number. Clients, before awarding the project, ask them whether you can visit their office at Virginia, US and their answers will be NO because they don't have an office there. They might use other tackling techniques.

Please don't engage this company for your projects. You will lose money, time and energy.

To Clients(who blindly believing openwire solutions and offering them Projects)
--- I pity you! That’s your innocence offering projects to openwire solutions. You will never get your project done on time. First of all, they never tell you project timeline..you’ll not get what you really expects from openwire solutions once your projects been offered to them. Not only me…victims of this company are many.. who lost their money trusting them offered project. They will ask you to pay for 1st phase of project without even finishing what you really expects to be finished..and then they make you believe showing you some clickable stuffs telling half of your project has been finished successfully and ask you to pay for next phase. Actually you are losing it..you never get your projects delivered. If you ask for timeline/updates..you’ll get too many evasive answers from them telling your project is undergone for Unit Testing or Quality Assurance team.. but fact is, there’s no such team to do it.. as far as I enquired about openwire solutions, What they have on their official website and what they have on elance, guru, .. portfolio is utterly fake. Everything in portfolio has been trickily stolen from other sites and source. FAKE FAKE FAKE…!

To Fresher/experienced developers(who wants to join in openwire solutions)
----Oh gosh! have u been called for position of Business analyst or Senior software developer? Well.. I personally plead you not to join in ows(OpenWireSolutions) if you really concern about your career growth. This is real piece of shit, so is your career. I’m certain, you never get an exposure working here as what other good IT company might have.. This is not a company at all, it’s just a tiny 3BHK rental apartment named openwire solutions. Inside, there will be some 9 - 15 pc in which many are not working properly..messy environment, no ac, disgusting loo, you will not get your salary ever, no benefits.. if you ask your rights to HR..you’ll be fired out of company.. still you wanna join here? Then can’t help you! Your life is under jeopardy if you join in openwire solutions. You’ll learn nothing here.. Unprofessionalism is a mantra of openwire solutions.. damn..cheater! BEWARE..BEWARE..BEWARE..!

These are some of their reviews on the Internet. Please visit these URL's before awarding the projects to them.

http://www.ripoffreport.com/business-consulting/openwire-solutions/openwire-solutions-openwire-so-08b92.htm

http://www.consumercomplaints.in/complaints/openwire-solutions-c659423.html#c1316763

http://www.scaminformer.com/scam-report/openwire-solutions-openwire-solutions-inc-vienna-c58049.html

http://www.ripoffreport.com/directory/Openwire-Solutions.aspx

http://www.ripoffreport.com/websites/openwire-solutions/openwire-solutions-fraud-fake-57608.htm

http://www.ripoffreport.com/small-business-services/openwire-solutions/openwire-solutions-offshore-s-cfac0.htm

This company is total scam and fit for nothing.

Clients: Don't engage this firm for your projects and regret. They deliver nothing and you will lose your MONEY & TIME!!

Candidates: Never ever join this firm. It's better you sit at home but don't make a mistake of joining this firm. They won't pay you salary and you won't learn anything here. Project manager whose name is Karthikeyan doesn't know anything and he won't encourage you. He knows only to yell at you and use all cheap techniques to throw you out saying your performance was bad.

Thanks,
Suba Anandhan.
AKIT
 
Jan 14, 2015

All about Blue Whale Solutions Good Company

Today carrier in IT is quit difficult to get in. So my comment is where ever you are be in now,go here and get knowledge and experience to develop your self.

It is a place for develop your knowledge in different platform of IT like Java,.net,php,android,ios and so on..,

Person like Abscond kindly no need of go there.

If your dream in IT carrier you can be..,,

I here`d that they are giving good practical work to they are fresher employed with them by experienced employee in different plat form like what i said before.

So., Finally what the think is all about Blue Whale Solutions is....,,,
Helps to
Get Skill in different Software in present market
Develop your skill and knowledge
Platform for you to prove yourself
Move forward into your carrier.

Will Give chances for FRESHER to prove them self.
Raj
 
Dec 29, 2014

BEWARE!!! FRAUD COMPANY BLUEWHALE doing FAKE CAMPUS RECRUITMENT

Dear all,

Blue whale solutions is a fake company who invites the candidates as a software company and demands money. Now they are involving in another fraud. Our college got a mail from this company from the person as Mahesh Kumar, HR-Manager (8695272033) (email: maheshkumar@bluewhalesolutions.com) requesting for a campus drive. They will be asking to book flight ticket as if they are son of Bill Gates and showcasing that their company is like Google. DONT BELIEVE IN BLUE WHALE SOLUTIONS IT IS FAKE. http://www.bluewhalesolutions.com/

They will recruit candidates for the software development position. Once after recruiting the students they will take them to their office in Chennai and tell them that your technical is weak you need to train and demand money from them.

In reality it is only a engineering project doing company for students, a training institute. They are not even worth for that. This companies original name what OpenWire Solutions. They have already done so many fraud in this name. Thats why they have changed it to BlueWhale Solutions.

ALL STUDENTS AND PLACEMENT OFFICERS PLEASE BEWARE OF THIS FAKE COMPANY BLUEWHALE SOLUTIONS
Prema
 
Dec 23, 2014

Neutral

A New Blog, a New Adventure
December 14, 2011 By Antonio Cangiano 9 Comments

14
As many of my friends, colleagues, and followers know, I’ve been working on the book Technical Blogging: Turn Your Expertise into a Remarkable Online Presence for the past few months.
I wrapped up writing a couple of weeks ago and the book is now headed into production phase, where any additional intervention on my part will be limited and the heavy lifting will be left to the fine folks at The Pragmatic Bookshelf.
Over two hundred and fifty pages is a lot of writing on any subject, no matter how much you love it, and I’m currently enjoy a bit of rest from this recent large scale project. This small break from writing has given me the opportunity to think about what I’d like to do next.
Despite being a very passionate programmer, a few years ago I caught the internet marketing bug. I’m thankful I did, as it has brought me plenty of satisfaction and many economical rewards as a web entrepreneur.
This is to say that I’m the rare breed of programmer who doesn’t despise or belittle marketing. Quite the opposite actually; I love it.
As such I realized that I’m not quite done talking about blogging and internet marketing; I’ve only began to delve into it. Therefore I’m launching this new blog, aptly named after my book, for the following three reasons:
I want to share my knowledge about technical blogging with an as large audience as possible. While the book is admittedly selling extremely well even before it’s gone to print (it’s in beta as of December 2011), I’d like to reach an even larger group of people. Blogging is the best way I know of to achieve this goal.
I’m a fan of eating my own dog food. Within the book I outlined a great plan to transform virtually anyone into a successful blogger. I have done it before, but I intend to follow my own plan and advice to the letter with this blog and showcase how things turn out.
I’m a business man. There is plenty of money to be made by sharing your knowledge online through a blog. As I help other people do what I’m already doing with my technical blogs, I’ll also get to increase my influence and income through this blog as well.
The third point is self-serving, but there is nothing wrong with that. When you work hard at something, it’s totally fine for those who find value in what you do to end up rewarding you economically for all your diligent effort.
That’s the very spirit of entrepreneurship and much of what makes modern society a comfortable place to live.
Periodically I’ll detail the progress of this blog, in terms of statistics and perhaps earnings as well (as I touched on in the book regarding some of the other blogs I own).
For the time being, I encourage you to subscribe to this site via email or RSS feed, for free, insightful, no-fluff tips on how to become a successful blogger.
If you are not convinced, check out the about section where I outline my mission, what’s in store for you here, and who my target readers are.
Happy blogging!
Don’t Count on Ads
December 17, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano Leave a Comment

ABPDr. Dobbs is an iconic publication for programmers. Yesterday they announced that they’d be shutting down after 38 years of operation. Despite its growing audience, the site has failed to monetize those eyeballs to a degree that satisfies their parent company.
Sadness aside, what’s remarkable here is that their number of page views grew while revenue went down. That means that their RPM (Revenue Per Mille, so per thousand impressions) has gone down.
In fact, here is the motivation behind their decision:
Why would a well-known site, dearly loved by its readers and coming off a year of record page views, be sunset by its owner?
In one word, revenue. Four years ago, when I came to Dr. Dobb’s, we had healthy profits and revenue, almost all of it from advertising. Despite our excellent growth on the editorial side, our revenue declined such that today it’s barely 30% of what it was when I started. […] This is because in the last 18 months, there has been a marked shift in how vendors value website advertising. They’ve come to realize that website ads tend to be less effective than they once were. Given that I’ve never bought a single item by clicking on an ad on a website, this conclusion seems correct in the small.
What does this mean for much smaller online publications like bloggers? Ads have historically been the easiest way for bloggers to earn some income from their blogs. You’d embed some code obtained from a network like Google Adsense, and collect royalties at the end of the month. [1]
Google doesn’t allow disclosure of specific numbers about their program’s RPM so that’s not a conversation we can have. Nevertheless, if you Google it (boy have we come to depend on them) you’ll find that it’s not uncommon for blogs to sit somewhere between $1–4 per impression, depending on subject matter, ad position, ad network, etc. [2]
In general you’re allowed up to three ad placements on a page, so you could in theory have an RPM per page between $3 and $12. That means that a blog achieving 100,000 page views per month could be earning between $300-$1,200 solely from a single ad network.
Now, 100,000 page views per month are far from easy, but entirely possible after a while. And $300-$1,200 is a nice amount of extra pocket change for the occasional or even dedicated blogger. That’s not however the case if blogging is your day job or if you are a larger company with staff and writers to support.
Ads are not dead as far as bloggers are concerned, but those interested in maximizing their revenue must realize that advertising on the web has its limits. They are part of a healthy meal, but not the whole meal.
The reason for that was explained by the Dr. Dobb’s quote above. Advertisers have found web ads to not be as lucrative as other options. Ask anyone who’s tried their hand at Google Adwords and they will all tell you how easy it is to lose your shirt if you are not extremely careful, and how hard it is to make a profit.
People have learned to ignore ads. Banner blindness is as real as it ever was. For technical audiences, AdBlock plugins are also something to contend with. [3] The truth is that what’s good for advertisers is good for publishers, and ads have not been serving advertisers too well. [4]
Your blog revenue strategy shouldn’t count on ads alone. Sponsorship, directly negotiated with the right companies, are already more rewarding. However, I contend that affiliate marketing, done through genuine reviews, recommendations, and mentions is far superior both in terms of revenue and service offered to advertisers. Furthermore, if the recommendations are authentic and not done just for a quick buck, they serve your audience as well. It’s a win-win-win situation all around.
You’ll also want to consider being your own advertiser. Selling your own products and services through your blog can be extremely lucrative and doesn’t generally come across as disgraceful to your audience in the way that excessive advertisement can.
Finally, remember that a lot of value can be extracted from your blog in ways that are not directly translated into a dollar figure. As I stress in my book, blogging can open the door to new job opportunities, partnerships, the ability to promote your own projects or startup, increase your authority within your field, and many other indirect benefits.
That is if Google didn’t randomly decide to accuse you of some form of fraudulent clicking and lock your account without paying you what you’ve already earned. ↩
People who create sites and blogs specifically made for Adsense, will often have much higher RPM because they target the most rewarding keywords and niches on purpose. For example, they may launch sites about insurance and law firms. ↩
While AdBlock cannot be blamed for Dr. Dobb’s demise, it surely didn’t help that the audience of programmers, as a whole, has a large percentage of AdBlock users. ↩
To fight against banner blindness, unscrupulous advertisers and publishers have created increasingly obnoxious or misleading ads, such as the common “One trick to a…” campaigns with hand drawn graphics. They are hand drawn because it makes them look less like ads (this won’t last forever). Likewise, some site’s templates have begun embedding ads that look like related articles at the bottom of the page, thus tricking you into believing that an ad is genuine content.
Prema
 
Dec 23, 2014

Very Good

Why Every Professional Should Consider Blogging
January 28, 2012 By Antonio Cangiano 43 Comments

209
I often argue that professionals should share their knowledge online via blogging.
The catch is that virtually anything worthwhile in life takes time and effort, and blogging is not an exception to this statement. So before committing your energy to such an endeavor, you may rightfully stop and wonder what’s in it for you. Is blogging really worth it?
In this article, I briefly illustrate some of the main benefits that directly derive from running a technical blog.
1. Blogging can improve your communication skills
Communication and writing, much like programming, are skills honed through countless hours of practice. As you work hard at articulating your thoughts into words, you’ll find that the process ends up improving your ability to express yourself. And communication is key, almost regardless of your profession.
Over time, you’ll become a faster and better technical writer, who’s able to come up with an insightful essay or tutorial in just an hour or two.
Even better, you’ll be able to concisely formulate confusing or undefined thoughts into exact words. Vague thoughts that you considered in your head will either prove to be valid and gain strength throughout the process of formalizing them into words, or quickly fall apart as flawed ideas once you see them on the screen.
This habit will make you not only a better communicator, but also a better, clearer thinker.
2. Blogging can improve your technical skills
One of the most successful learning technique I know is to try to teach what you’re currently learning yourself to other people.
The process of explaining something to others quickly solidifies your knowledge and outlines its shortcomings, exposing your own doubts about the material you’re studying. This is why writing down and paraphrasing a book, something bright student often do, is a powerful technique that helps retain and clarify your understanding of the information you’re gathering.
As a blogger, you are likely to improve your technical skills because you are forced to research further topics in order to properly share them with the public. You might be corrected by commenters who know more about the subject than you do, and learn a lot from them in the process. As well you may learn more as others expand on what you had to say within their blogs, or perhaps force you to answer more questions about the topic than you thought about in the first place.
As I mentioned in my book, blogging is just as much as teaching as it is about starting a conversation. These conversations will often help increase your expertise and well-roundedness.
The collaborative power of blogging was truly highlighted and pushed to the limit by the Fields medalist Professor Timothy Gowers with his Polymath Project, in which his blog and commenting section was used to figure out unsolved mathematical problems collaboratively.
3. Blogging can provide you with a repository for your knowledge
Some people like to use personal wikis for this purpose, but blogging can be an excellent way to keep track of information you intend to retrieve at a later stage. For example many programmers use their own old posts to find particular snippets of code, the exact steps to configure a server, or a given URL for a useful service they blogged about.
At times you’ll find that googling for a given problem will bring up an article from your own blog that you may very well have forgotten about. (And if that post doesn’t solve your problem, you can curse your past self for not providing more details back when you wrote it.)
Looking back at your old posts is also a great way to keep track of progress, and have access to a timeline of what you were dealing with, thinking, and doing at a given moment in the past. It’s fun to look back once in a while and introspect about how far you’ve come. This can often provide you with glimpses of insight about where your career and professional interests are headed.
4. Blogging can help make powerful connections
Technical blogging injects you into an online community of fellow professionals who are passionate about the topic they are writing about. If you are contributing valuable information and insight, and link to others, you’ll likely end up on the radar of these people, and ultimately connect with other world class players in your field.
Blogging is certainly cheaper than flying across the world non-stop to meet all these folks at expensive conferences (though blogging is not a substitute for in-person human interaction).
Society functions through people interacting, connecting, and networking. How you use this opportunity is up to you, but it can definitely be a boost for your career, business, or even life in general to be in touch with other experts in the field of your choice.
5. Blogging can help you make friends
Even better than powerful acquaintances are friends. As a prominent blogger you’ll get to meet and interact with a wealth of people online. If you’re social and available to others, you’ll end up making friends (influential and less influential ones alike) online.
I’ve lost count of how many people I’ve come to know thanks to my technical blogs.
Sometimes it’s a case of someone who comments often and you get to know them better through this route. Other times it is a fellow blogger. Often, it’s someone who noticed you through your blog and gets in touch via email. If you are fairly popular in your field, you may even get the occasional ego boosting, “Oh, I follow your blog” when introducing yourself at meetups or trade conferences.
6. Blogging can provide you with a second income
Most bloggers live under the false assumption that you can’t make serious money from running a blog on the side. They understand that if you dedicate yourself full-time, there is money to be made, but they severely underestimate how much revenue you can generate with just a couple of hours of your time per week. They’ve tried or heard horror stories from people making mere pennies with AdSense, and assume that they can’t monetize their own blog unless they’re really famous.
A few hundred dollars a month from your blog is absolutely within the reach of any professional out there. If you do everything right, and put in the work required, your blog can even make you thousands of dollars, both directly and indirectly.
My technical blogs make me a few thousand dollars every month, and I often end up not touching them for weeks at the time. Blogging is not passive income, but if you know what you are doing, all the content you produce compounds and ends up providing you with a substantial income – even when you neglect the blog for a few weeks or months at a time.
Blogging can provide you with some serious extra income that you can then use to finance your hobby, buy gadgets, pay off debt, or do whatever else you desire. It’s a really nice feeling to receive a few extra checks each month, and it will further motivate you to continue blogging.
In my book I cover in great detail how I go about monetizing my blogs, but I’ll also talk more about this subject on this site (subscribe via feed or email if you’d like to be notified of such future articles).
7. Blogging can score you freebies
Publishers and PR firms have become aware of the influence bloggers have on targeted audiences. Even as a mildly successful blogger, you can expect to be contacted by a multitude of people offering you freebies. Depending on your niche and field, these offers will typically be for books, but it’s not uncommon to receive offers for other items, including tickets for conferences, gadgets, software, etc.
As long as you disclose your affiliation (in a way that makes the FTC happy), it’s actually very nice to routinely receive freebies of this kind. If you like what you receive, you can then blog about that product and review it for your readers.
Often, if you establish good relationships with publishers and PR firms, you can even organize giveaway contests which benefit your readers, not just yourself.
8. Blogging can advance your career
A few of the previous benefits I mentioned have already revealed how blogging can have a positive impact in your career. However, I’d like to stress just how much blogging can open certain doors for you. Every post you make is a new opportunity to get people to notice you on a professional level.
Because of my blogs, but primarily my programming one, I’ve received countless job offers over the years, including some from a selection of the largest and most sought after companies in the world. Some offered me generous relocation packages to the US, and a few went so far as to offer me the job, no questions asked (e.g., they didn’t even require a formal interview, they had sized me up enough through my blog writing).
I got my job at IBM in Canada mainly thanks to my blog (at the time I was still in Europe).
Whether blogging allows you to find a new job, customers, partners, investors, publishers who are interested in having you authoring a book, or something else entirely, it is certainly a great career booster.
In fact, my number one piece of advice for new professionals who are interested in building their careers is to start blogging today.
9. Blogging can make you popular in your field
Most professionals work hard because they want to be successful and gain recogniztion in their field. Blogging aides with that and can make small celebrities out of regular professionals. For those in the tech world, this is not an uncommon occurrence. Names like Joel Spolsky, Derek Sivers, Steve Yegge, and Scott Hanselman come to mind.
I’m reminded of Joey Roth’s “Charlatan, Martyr, Hustler” poster. If you do incredible work but nobody knows about it you are a martyr. If you accomplish nothing and do no work, but talk a sweet talk, you are a charlatan. If you can walk the walk, and talk the talk, then you are a hustler.
Blogging helps you ensure that you can talk the talk and reach the right audience, once you have walked the walk.
10. Blogging can help you reach and teach a wide audience
The number one reason to blog for many people, is the desire to share their knowledge and teach others.
For some, even in the technical realm, it’s a matter of politics. For example, an Agile development professional may actually want to influence the community and advocate his theories and ideas about the process of developing software, so that they (potentially) become widespread.
Others, may use this teaching tool to promote their technical projects. An example, also from the software development world, is blogging to help people become aware, loyal, and eventually proficient in an open source tool that you created.

As you can imagine, these are just some of the many benefits of blogging. As you begin creating your own blog posts, you’ll likely find that some of them fall into place organically, whereas you need to work at others. All however, stand to enrich your career and life, and help inspire you to keep blogging for years to come.
Rajab Hs
 
Dec 23, 2014

Verdict

Google Killed the RSS Feed
November 12, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano Leave a Comment

1
The RSS feed is in a coma. Google put it in that state and, boy, have they ever dropped the ball on this one.
Video Killed the Radio Star
It all started with Google’s attempt to steer their huge ship towards the mythical land of all things Social. You see, Facebook’s success really took a few giant tech companies by surprise. Google in particular. Surely, they thought to themselves, we must be able to compete.
So instead of focusing on their core competency, they decided to start throwing Social everywhere. It showed up in their search results. It was pushed down your Gmail throat. You had to have a Google+ account to use Google’s services in any capacity. UI and accounts got more and more confusing. YouTubers weren’t spared either.
Oh, and they wanted your real name, like Facebook. If you are secretly transgender or wanted by the Iranian government, tough luck, kiddo. (The relative lack of Social success and massive protests have eventually led them to change their initial policy.)
So what does this circus has to do with the RSS feed? Well, when you’re wearing Social blinders, that’s all you can see. They discontinued most of their services that couldn’t be adopted to this narrow world view.
Google Reader, the first successful attempt at making RSS feeds somewhat mainstream, was shut down. Instead of this handy service that was already loved by millions around the world, they wanted you to share articles on their social network. Follow people, put them in circles, and generally pretend you were on Facebook. There, they figured, no need to properly follow a feed with the purpose of never missing a new article. Good stuff will bubble up to the surface. Hopefully.
To round things off, they also got rid of the RSS button in Chrome so that finding the feed for a site is now a decent first exercise in learning HTML programming for the general public.
These two simple steps by Google have pretty much mortally wounded the RSS feed. It won’t recover I’m afraid and it’s a damn shame. A minority of geeks will continue to use the technology via services like Feedly, but the mainstream dream is gone.
All for a social network that relatively few people use, let alone in any serious capacity (at least in part because Google stubbornly refuses to open their API to allow third-party apps, like Buffer and Hootsuite, to post on people’s own profiles).
If you think I’m just talking hypothetically, think again. I saw one of my blogs go from a healthy 16,000 RSS subscribers to less than 300 in the span of just a month or so after this change was made (many, including my wife, who is a popular blogger in her field, witnessed the same sort of abrupt, brutal nosedive with her RSS numbers as well).
From a blogger’s perspective, this irreversible change has some serious implications:
Email subscriptions have never been more important. Unlike Facebook subscribers or Twitter followers who will rarely see your updates, emails are still being read and given a certain importance by the subscriber (Google is trying to mess this up too, but that’s a whole other post). You need to capture people’s email as it’s the only guaranteed delivery method for your updates that you have. (On that note, you can subscribe here.)
Feel free to maximize your social media properties and efforts, engage and entertain users, but have an email subscription as your ultimate call to action.
For the sake of us geeks who are unwilling to give up the good fight, do be sure to prominently feature an RSS feed link/button on your blog or site.
If your audience is not technical, consider having a ‘How to follow this blog’ link with step-by-step instructions on using Feedly or Bloglovin (the latter of which is particularly popular among women).
It’s an unfortunate turn of events that has damaged blogging in an untold number of ways. Thankfully, it hasn’t killed things off entirely though, especially if we are willing to adapt.
Why Should I Care About Your Blog?
January 16, 2013 By Antonio Cangiano 4 Comments

9
When I visit a blog for the first time, I usually have one key question in the back of my mind, “Why should I care about this blog?”. There is no shortage of blogs and articles online, and in the face of such a huge volume of written content, why should I spend my limited time reading your blog?
Sure, if I Googled for a specific question and your blog came up on the first page of results, I might read what you have to say, but unless you can provide a compelling, convincing and satisfying answer to that lingering question before I close my browser tab, I’m likely gone forever.
This means your site needs to answer this key question within a few seconds or, at best, a couple of minutes. That’s a challenging task for sure. You can’t write an essay trying to convince someone that they should stick around, subscribe to your site, or take a keen interest in you, because chances are a given reader will leave before they’ve even read that post. Therefore, as is often the case in life, first impressions really do count.
I’m not claiming you need a gorgeous looking blog, though having one certainly doesn’t hurt either. What I’m talking about is answering the pressing question at hand by presenting an obvious answer. You’re aiming for an answer that can be inferred immediately upon visiting your blog.
The following are a few variables that can be used to answer the important question that this post’s title asks.
Your content

The most frequent interaction visitors will have with your blog is through a random post. If your content is good, readers may naturally assume you talk about that particular topic on an ongoing basis and appreciate the way you’ve covered it.
Providing value to the reader in each and every post, ensures — above all else — that the user will feel a rapid connection with your blog and a have justified reason to care about it.
Your blog title

Explicit is better than implicit. Your title should explain to the user what your blog is about. Obviously there are some popular exceptions of sites that have succeeded with seemingly meaningless titles, but you are unlikely to be a statistical outlier like those sites. As such, why not do yourself a favour and opt for a great name that really explains what your site is all about from the get-go?
Take any advantage you can get to convey the essence of your blog through your title. “John’s Personal Blog”, for example, doesn’t mean anything to me, the viewer. Why should I care, and what is the site actually about? “John’s Travel Adventures” is a better starting point (assuming I’m interested in travel).
Your tagline

Your blog’s tagline should sell your blog to the reader. You want it to not only continue to explain what your site is about, but to also introduce some form of benefit to your visitors. For this site, mine is:
Grow your audience and make money online by sharing your knowledge.
Assuming you are interested in gaining popularity through technical writing or in making extra cash by blogging, this should sound appealing to you, the reader, and succinctly provide you with an answer regarding why you should care about it.
In the example of John’s travel blog, a tagline like, “How I travel throughout the world on a shoestring budget” would narrow the focus of the site to a certain type of travel. If a visitor falls into this audience, they would likely care about John’s site because they also would enjoy traveling around the world on the cheap.
Your about

What’s in it for them? Your sidebar blurb (if any) and your About section should do a detailed job of explaining what your blog is about, what you cover within it, and what benefits it will bring to your readers. My About starts with the following two paragraphs:
Technical Blogging is a blog dedicated to relentlessly helping bloggers and entrepreneurs succeed online.
Our aim is to provide you with all the practical information you need to start and grow a successful technical blog (as opposed to a personal blog about your kids).
Note how this isn’t really about me. It’s about the reader and what I can help them with.
I then go on to include a Who is this for? section which explicitly tells the reader if they’re the right audience for the type of content I intend to unleash to the world. Finally, the page ends with a list of reasons why you might want to trust me on the topic of blogging.
Don’t forget to include a picture of yourself to connect at a more “primal” level with your visitors. Including a small picture of yourself within the sidebar is also a good idea (only a few people will check out your about page).
Your ‘start here’

A powerful way to guide the user towards a deeper understanding of why your blog is worth paying attention and subscribing to is provide them with more than just the specific article they landed on.
On some blogs you might have seen a link within posts that says something along the lines of, “If you’re new around here, check out our Start Here page”. From there the viewer will be sent through a rabbit hole of some of your best, and most organized, content that provides both the bigger picture and immediate value to the reader. (See this page for example.)
Get these fundamentals right to better answer the “Why should I care about this blog?” question your visitors will have. Then integrate opportune calls to action to subscribe via RSS, email, etc. You will grant yourself a higher degree of conversion from random viewers to regular readers. It really is as simple as that.
Rajab Hs
 
Dec 23, 2014

Statics

Is YouTube Worth Your Time as a Marketing Tool?
November 25, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano 2 Comments

Will it blend?A reader wrote to me with a question about whether YouTube was worth it as a marketing tool.
The shortest answer I could give is that today YouTube is as important as having a blog.
Here is why:
YouTube, which is owned by Google, is the most used search engine after Google itself.
When a quality video matches a query that someone searched for on Google, that video will be returned with the rest of the web results… at the top. I don’t have conversion statistics, but I can only assume a sizable percentage of viewers will click on the videos both due to their location in the SERP (Search Engine Result Page) and the nature of the content (watching a video takes less effort than reading an article). In other words, YouTube is an easy SEO shortcut to the top.
Humans are highly visual animals. People are much more likely to watch a video than read an equivalent article.
YouTube goes out of its way to promote your channel and videos if they consider them to be interesting and engaging. This helps you reach a potentially large audience for free.
Playlists let you keep the viewer engaged with your content and message.
Unlike Facebook, which will only allow you to reach a subset of subscribers unless you pay for a broader audience, once you have a YouTube subscriber in place, you can easily reach them every time you post a new video.
Video can tell so much more about your product and the company behind it (even if there isn’t a product that’s being sold per se).
With more people canceling their Cable subscriptions in favor of smart TVs, media boxes like the Apple TV or Chromecast, or even tablets, expect to see far greater numbers of folks tuning in to watch video content on such devices.
Social media is very keen on video, as it works well for people who are in “surfing mode”. Videos also tend to be shared more often than textual content.
YouTube allows people to link to their external sites on their channel page, in video descriptions, and even within video annotations. So you can certainly send people to your YouTube channel via your blog, but you’ll also get a wider audience to learn about your blog through YouTube.
This blog audience can be broadly divided in the following categories, which at times can overlap:
Professionals interested in advancing their career via blogging.
Freelancers interested in finding clients via blogging.
Startup owners interested in promoting their startup via blogging.
Company owners or workers interested in promoting products via blogging.
Non-profit or open source developers, interested in promoting their non-profit projects and initiatives via blogging.
People interested in making extra money online by sharing their knowledge via blogging.
People interested in making a full-time income via blogging.
Replace “via blogging” with “via YouTube” and you’ll quickly see how applicable YouTube is to each one of these types of readers.
I would recommend that the same type of content you use for blogging also shows up in your YouTube channel. A freelancer for example, will need to showcase their expertise and offer solutions to problems that their customers might have. That’s as true on their blog as on YouTube. In fact, if available, calling your YouTube channel the same as your blog is definitely not a bad idea either.
You could then leverage the strengths of each type of media and opt for articles about particular problems and videos for others. A screencast is sometimes easier than trying to explain things in writing, for example.
Interestingly, while I have read and studied extensively this subject, I don’t have a personal YouTube channel for this or any of my other blogs. This, however, is something that I intend to fix soon.
On that note, one of the best courses I have ever come across on this subject is this one on Udemy, which I highly recommend to anyone who wants to give YouTube a go or to take their channel to the next level.

How Often Should You Blog?
December 2, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano Leave a Comment

Calendar iconPeople who are new to blogging often wonder what the best posting pace to maximize the growth of their blog is. The ideal blog posting frequency will depend on several factors, including the type of audience and the subject at hand. Let’s narrow things down however to an acceptable range.
I wouldn’t consider a blog that posts less than once a month to be an active blog. [1] Conversely, a blog that isn’t powered by multiple authors and/or isn’t a professional news outlet or the like, probably shouldn’t post more than a couple of times a day at most. [2]
So we have a wide range here. From once a month to two or three posts per day. Which one is right for you?
My suggestion is to base the answer on a couple of factors.
First, your ability to produce valuable content plays a huge role. It is always, without a doubt, better to post great content less frequently than to post useless stuff for the sake of posting often. Based on the time you can dedicate to blogging and your speed in researching and producing posts, being completely honest with yourself, how many great posts can you comfortably push out each week?
For most people the answers is one or two a week at most. If you have to, it really is better to compromise quantity over quality.
The second factor is consistency. Are you able to deliver your set number of articles per week on a regular basis? [3] If you only write two articles per week on your good weeks, it’s far better to set your publishing schedule to one post per week and leverage good weeks to stock up in advance on scheduled posts. This will also save you from constantly feeling like you need to write everything at the last-minute.
Try to be somewhat consistent in establishing a certain posting frequency expectation among your readers. You want your audience to feel like your posts are a regular part of their week/month that they can look forward to and enjoy on a regular basis.
In the case of this blog, I’ve set an informal pace of one post per week. On my programming blog, I now post twice a week.
If you are already blogging with a certain regularity, how many posts per month or week do you publish?
This can be okay if you have multiple blogs, and some of these are on the back burner intentionally. I have some rarely updated blogs myself. ^
Exceptions do exist of course. Particularly if you are doing nano-publishing, where the content is mostly small quips and links to other resources. ^
If you are a long time follower of this blog or others of mine, you’ll know that I have failed at times to blog with consistency. There have been periods where blogging wasn’t a priority and my online properties weren’t updated as often as they should have as a result. I have recently recommitted to blogging on a regular basis on two of my blogs, Technical Blogging and Zen and the Art of Programming. ^
FraudBWS
 
Dec 19, 2014

Stop your 420 and fraud works bluewhale solutions

Stop all your activities. Show all your hidden secrets. Human beings like me working there are believing you
Stop cheating and ruining students and freshers,employees life to fill money in your pocket. Please learn ethics first then start a business and do some good things to anyone..Be transparent to the employees during joining and explain them your situation first.First give valid experience certificate by registering your firm to income tax and our government. you ruined my one year and one month time in my life which was an important phase to start my career and to any one.

Please dont believe this good comments below dear students,freshers and employees. All are a trap for your life by blue whale solutions
FraudBWS
 
Dec 19, 2014

Dont believe in good reviews guys. Its posted by SEO guys and thats a complete trap for all freshers.Very Worst company

For any freshers joining in any corporate or MNC company there will be training or trainer for each person or for a team atleast. Here nothing like that. Learn yourself first and prove yourself within 3 months then only we will conform your job and salary details.

Offer letter without salary details and proper contents. All points will be Its a damn cheating for freshers who think they are genuine. Honestly saying the word genuine or good or best or awesome is an unmatched tag for them. Fraud and cheat only suits you bluewhale solutions

If any freshers ask about salary or their basic needs when working there they will be thrown out in approximately two weeks and I saw it, also experienced it as developer when asked for salary there. They will make us to work like anything. when i say work mean working hours will be 15 hrs and that will be completely unsafe for women who is working there.

They are saying that they have offices in US and bangalore too but real thing after verifying we came to know that they have only one office in chennai with max 10 employees including me when I was working in that fraud's trap.They are calling candidates for interview and asking them to join for software development training after getting selected and we need to pay them 10000 INR. What the hell is this??.. no company has a thing or strategy like this

It seems that this fraud bluewhale solutions company is not registered and certified by government. I came to know this when I have attended and selected for another company with the experience certificate from this fraud and cheating company. Didnt believe it? then check it in ministry of corporate or company affairs Totally waste of time for working there for me.Only pain is left for me..they gave me mental and physical pain. They didnt give even single rupee as salary..You can notice that every year they will send out some employees and hire only freshers and get work from them without salary and cycle continues every year..I am warning existing employees that please be aware of management because anything will happen to your job at any time which depends on mood of high class cheaters.

It seems that there is no proper way or team to get and complete,support the projects ..so clients are frustrated.Many times this fraud company cheated clients by getting money and delivered improper projects..I saw one blog also when I worked there in january which stated all scams done by this company but I didnt believe it that time.Now i regret for it..that blog was deleted it seems by seo guys..Better avoid this company's trap and dont become a victim like me.Its a complete ruin to any one career..Try always reputed,registered and certified companies to start your career not a fraud one like this company..Its an alert for freshers, existing employees and i feel pity for you. frustrated.Many times this fraud company cheated
karthik12
 
Dec 9, 2014

super growing company

BWS (Blue whale solution) is one of the best growing company. And they providing fantastic facilities to the employees, i like to work in here.................
karthik12
 
Dec 8, 2014

Good place to work

It is a very good experience for me.Good platform to start carrier for freshers here. Very pleasant environment. Good for freshers to start your carrier...
hameed17
 
Dec 8, 2014

Good Working Culture

I am working in blue whale solutions,Good place to start your carrier here.Good working culture and good exposure for the freshers.
Stable Growth and friendly teammates.
Ranganayagi
 
Dec 8, 2014

Good Management

I am working in Blue Whale Solutions, Its a very good platform to start my carrier here.Good Infrastructure, you will get more opportunities to learn from the basics. Top Managements are moving very friendly.
gautamsvce
 
Dec 8, 2014

can have a better career

i am an employee of bws. by working here i can assume myself a better career in future. bws offers its employees to work on role so that we are able to learn the entire things on our domain...
rajeshbws
 
Dec 8, 2014

a nice atmosphere to work

"Lot of onsite opportunities after a certain experience, good work environment"

"Good work culture, good opportunities to work on new business domain
sujinsusee
 
Dec 8, 2014

good pavement to learn

It is very good work experience in bws.I learnt lot of new things not only related to work but as to grow as good IT professional
monishabws
 
Dec 8, 2014

blue whale solutions management is really good

for a start-up company, blue whale solutions management is really good. i personally feels that it provides a platform for freshers to learn. the company has overcome the initial hiccups and developed a lot
MIRSHA
 
Dec 8, 2014

ITS A GOOD PLACE FOR FRESHERS TO LEARN

bws is a good place to learn for freshers. here by training, freshers can be able to get a bright career.
vasanth2589
 
Dec 8, 2014

VERY GOOD COMPANY

I would say that this company is very good place for the freshers to learn. It will be a platform for all the employees to learn from basics.
priyatamil
 
Dec 7, 2014

Im escaped

OMg after redaing those review i came to an conclusion tat its totally waste who attend interview in this company >>>Thanks guys i got call for more then 2 times to come and attend d interview .i decided to go but atlast reading all reviews its not atal worth going der .
FOr the money sake dy r playing in our carrer.
sathrian
 
Dec 6, 2014

good for our future

Hi my dear friends am pleasure to sharing this information with you blue whale solution is very good place for our career growth and this is a good company. Here have a very good infrastructure and excellent environment. And we are getting very good response from the employer side. I got my expected salary from existed date. And this company was located in near by railway station so easy to reach in here. And i got all facility in here, i feel very happy to work in this company. My kind advice you please try get the opportunity in here..... bye (All the best)
ALICE RAJ
 
Dec 6, 2014

Good Platform for Freshers

Good Platform for Freshers
I am working in Blue Whale Solutions, Its a start up and developing company. Good platform for freshers to develop their knowledge and their skills. It has good Infrastructure smart and friendly colleagues. organisation can give importance for employees growth.
hrteambws@gmail.com
 
Dec 6, 2014

Good Platform for Freshers

I am working in Blue Whale Solutions, Its a start up and developing company. Good platform for freshers to develop their knowledge and their skills. It has good Infrastructure smart and friendly colleagues. organisation can give importance for employees growth.

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