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BLUE WHALE SOLUTIONS, VELACHERY, CHENNAI

India,
Tamil Nadu

Consumer complaints and reviews about BLUE WHALE SOLUTIONS, VELACHERY, CHENNAI

krishna_kumarp
 
Jan 22, 2015

"Blue Whale Solutions" Fraud company

Dear colleagues and candidates,
I am sending this information’s to all new fresh colleagues and candidates about this "Blue Whale Solutions" Fraud company
They are called Walkin interview in Chennai 20th to 26th January 2015, Qualification MCA,ME, M.Tech, BE, MSc. Etc..
Offering salary is below
Deposit in the company -10,000 RS (never get this deposit)
3 month no salary
After 3 month salary 6,000 RS ( this salary also not get as per other complaint)

originally this company name is "Openwire Solutions", a software firm at Velachery, Chennai. new name is "Blue Whale Solutions"
please find below old HR manager letter from the web about this company.


I'm Suba Anandhan, former HR of Openwire Solutions, a software firm at Velachery, Chennai. I'm writing this on behalf of my colleagues and candidates who got an offer from Openwire and willing to join them. This is not a company at all, this is just a 3 bedroom flat with 9-10 computers. No proper management, no salary, no delivery, nothing!! They get payments from the Client and deliver nothing. Please google "Openwire Solutions Complaints" and you can see lot more reviews about this firm.

Since I was in the HR department, I know very well about this firm. I know them in & out. Damn poor management. The owner of this firm doesn't know anything about software development and he speaks all bull shit!! They have 3-4 US numbers starting with (703), it's a magic jack number. Clients, before awarding the project, ask them whether you can visit their office at Virginia, US and their answers will be NO because they don't have an office there. They might use other tackling techniques.

Please don't engage this company for your projects. You will lose money, time and energy.

To Clients(who blindly believing openwire solutions and offering them Projects)
--- I pity you! That’s your innocence offering projects to openwire solutions. You will never get your project done on time. First of all, they never tell you project timeline..you’ll not get what you really expects from openwire solutions once your projects been offered to them. Not only me…victims of this company are many.. who lost their money trusting them offered project. They will ask you to pay for 1st phase of project without even finishing what you really expects to be finished..and then they make you believe showing you some clickable stuffs telling half of your project has been finished successfully and ask you to pay for next phase. Actually you are losing it..you never get your projects delivered. If you ask for timeline/updates..you’ll get too many evasive answers from them telling your project is undergone for Unit Testing or Quality Assurance team.. but fact is, there’s no such team to do it.. as far as I enquired about openwire solutions, What they have on their official website and what they have on elance, guru, .. portfolio is utterly fake. Everything in portfolio has been trickily stolen from other sites and source. FAKE FAKE FAKE…!

To Fresher/experienced developers(who wants to join in openwire solutions)
----Oh gosh! have u been called for position of Business analyst or Senior software developer? Well.. I personally plead you not to join in ows(OpenWireSolutions) if you really concern about your career growth. This is real piece of shit, so is your career. I’m certain, you never get an exposure working here as what other good IT company might have.. This is not a company at all, it’s just a tiny 3BHK rental apartment named openwire solutions. Inside, there will be some 9 - 15 pc in which many are not working properly..messy environment, no ac, disgusting loo, you will not get your salary ever, no benefits.. if you ask your rights to HR..you’ll be fired out of company.. still you wanna join here? Then can’t help you! Your life is under jeopardy if you join in openwire solutions. You’ll learn nothing here.. Unprofessionalism is a mantra of openwire solutions.. damn..cheater! BEWARE..BEWARE..BEWARE..!

These are some of their reviews on the Internet. Please visit these URL's before awarding the projects to them.

http://www.ripoffreport.com/business-consulting/openwire-solutions/openwire-solutions-openwire-so-08b92.htm

http://www.consumercomplaints.in/complaints/openwire-solutions-c659423.html#c1316763

http://www.scaminformer.com/scam-report/openwire-solutions-openwire-solutions-inc-vienna-c58049.html

http://www.ripoffreport.com/directory/Openwire-Solutions.aspx

http://www.ripoffreport.com/websites/openwire-solutions/openwire-solutions-fraud-fake-57608.htm

http://www.ripoffreport.com/small-business-services/openwire-solutions/openwire-solutions-offshore-s-cfac0.htm

This company is total scam and fit for nothing.

Clients: Don't engage this firm for your projects and regret. They deliver nothing and you will lose your MONEY & TIME!!

Candidates: Never ever join this firm. It's better you sit at home but don't make a mistake of joining this firm. They won't pay you salary and you won't learn anything here. Project manager whose name is Karthikeyan doesn't know anything and he won't encourage you. He knows only to yell at you and use all cheap techniques to throw you out saying your performance was bad.

Thanks,
Suba Anandhan.
AKIT
 
Jan 14, 2015

All about Blue Whale Solutions Good Company

Today carrier in IT is quit difficult to get in. So my comment is where ever you are be in now,go here and get knowledge and experience to develop your self.

It is a place for develop your knowledge in different platform of IT like Java,.net,php,android,ios and so on..,

Person like Abscond kindly no need of go there.

If your dream in IT carrier you can be..,,

I here`d that they are giving good practical work to they are fresher employed with them by experienced employee in different plat form like what i said before.

So., Finally what the think is all about Blue Whale Solutions is....,,,
Helps to
Get Skill in different Software in present market
Develop your skill and knowledge
Platform for you to prove yourself
Move forward into your carrier.

Will Give chances for FRESHER to prove them self.
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Excelent

As many of my friends, colleagues, and followers know, I’ve been working on the book Technical Blogging: Turn Your Expertise into a Remarkable Online Presence for the past few months.
I wrapped up writing a couple of weeks ago and the book is now headed into production phase, where any additional intervention on my part will be limited and the heavy lifting will be left to the fine folks at The Pragmatic Bookshelf.
Over two hundred and fifty pages is a lot of writing on any subject, no matter how much you love it, and I’m currently enjoy a bit of rest from this recent large scale project. This small break from writing has given me the opportunity to think about what I’d like to do next.
Despite being a very passionate programmer, a few years ago I caught the internet marketing bug. I’m thankful I did, as it has brought me plenty of satisfaction and many economical rewards as a web entrepreneur.
This is to say that I’m the rare breed of programmer who doesn’t despise or belittle marketing. Quite the opposite actually; I love it.
As such I realized that I’m not quite done talking about blogging and internet marketing; I’ve only began to delve into it. Therefore I’m launching this new blog, aptly named after my book, for the following three reasons:
I want to share my knowledge about technical blogging with an as large audience as possible. While the book is admittedly selling extremely well even before it’s gone to print (it’s in beta as of December 2011), I’d like to reach an even larger group of people. Blogging is the best way I know of to achieve this goal.
I’m a fan of eating my own dog food. Within the book I outlined a great plan to transform virtually anyone into a successful blogger. I have done it before, but I intend to follow my own plan and advice to the letter with this blog and showcase how things turn out.
I’m a business man. There is plenty of money to be made by sharing your knowledge online through a blog. As I help other people do what I’m already doing with my technical blogs, I’ll also get to increase my influence and income through this blog as well.
The third point is self-serving, but there is nothing wrong with that. When you work hard at something, it’s totally fine for those who find value in what you do to end up rewarding you economically for all your diligent effort.
That’s the very spirit of entrepreneurship and much of what makes modern society a comfortable place to live.
Periodically I’ll detail the progress of this blog, in terms of statistics and perhaps earnings as well (as I touched on in the book regarding some of the other blogs I own).
For the time being, I encourage you to subscribe to this site via email or RSS feed, for free, insightful, no-fluff tips on how to become a successful blogger.
If you are not convinced, check out the about section where I outline my mission, what’s in store for you here, and who my target readers are.
Happy blogging!
Don’t Count on Ads
December 17, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano Leave a Comment

ABPDr. Dobbs is an iconic publication for programmers. Yesterday they announced that they’d be shutting down after 38 years of operation. Despite its growing audience, the site has failed to monetize those eyeballs to a degree that satisfies their parent company.
Sadness aside, what’s remarkable here is that their number of page views grew while revenue went down. That means that their RPM (Revenue Per Mille, so per thousand impressions) has gone down.
In fact, here is the motivation behind their decision:
Why would a well-known site, dearly loved by its readers and coming off a year of record page views, be sunset by its owner?
In one word, revenue. Four years ago, when I came to Dr. Dobb’s, we had healthy profits and revenue, almost all of it from advertising. Despite our excellent growth on the editorial side, our revenue declined such that today it’s barely 30% of what it was when I started. […] This is because in the last 18 months, there has been a marked shift in how vendors value website advertising. They’ve come to realize that website ads tend to be less effective than they once were. Given that I’ve never bought a single item by clicking on an ad on a website, this conclusion seems correct in the small.
What does this mean for much smaller online publications like bloggers? Ads have historically been the easiest way for bloggers to earn some income from their blogs. You’d embed some code obtained from a network like Google Adsense, and collect royalties at the end of the month. [1]
Google doesn’t allow disclosure of specific numbers about their program’s RPM so that’s not a conversation we can have. Nevertheless, if you Google it (boy have we come to depend on them) you’ll find that it’s not uncommon for blogs to sit somewhere between $1–4 per impression, depending on subject matter, ad position, ad network, etc. [2]
In general you’re allowed up to three ad placements on a page, so you could in theory have an RPM per page between $3 and $12. That means that a blog achieving 100,000 page views per month could be earning between $300-$1,200 solely from a single ad network.
Now, 100,000 page views per month are far from easy, but entirely possible after a while. And $300-$1,200 is a nice amount of extra pocket change for the occasional or even dedicated blogger. That’s not however the case if blogging is your day job or if you are a larger company with staff and writers to support.
Ads are not dead as far as bloggers are concerned, but those interested in maximizing their revenue must realize that advertising on the web has its limits. They are part of a healthy meal, but not the whole meal.
The reason for that was explained by the Dr. Dobb’s quote above. Advertisers have found web ads to not be as lucrative as other options. Ask anyone who’s tried their hand at Google Adwords and they will all tell you how easy it is to lose your shirt if you are not extremely careful, and how hard it is to make a profit.
People have learned to ignore ads. Banner blindness is as real as it ever was. For technical audiences, AdBlock plugins are also something to contend with. [3] The truth is that what’s good for advertisers is good for publishers, and ads have not been serving advertisers too well. [4]
Your blog revenue strategy shouldn’t count on ads alone. Sponsorship, directly negotiated with the right companies, are already more rewarding. However, I contend that affiliate marketing, done through genuine reviews, recommendations, and mentions is far superior both in terms of revenue and service offered to advertisers. Furthermore, if the recommendations are authentic and not done just for a quick buck, they serve your audience as well. It’s a win-win-win situation all around.
You’ll also want to consider being your own advertiser. Selling your own products and services through your blog can be extremely lucrative and doesn’t generally come across as disgraceful to your audience in the way that excessive advertisement can.
Finally, remember that a lot of value can be extracted from your blog in ways that are not directly translated into a dollar figure. As I stress in my book, blogging can open the door to new job opportunities, partnerships, the ability to promote your own projects or startup, increase your authority within your field, and many other indirect benefits.
That is if Google didn’t randomly decide to accuse you of some form of fraudulent clicking and lock your account without paying you what you’ve already earned. ↩
People who create sites and blogs specifically made for Adsense, will often have much higher RPM because they target the most rewarding keywords and niches on purpose. For example, they may launch sites about insurance and law firms. ↩
While AdBlock cannot be blamed for Dr. Dobb’s demise, it surely didn’t help that the audience of programmers, as a whole, has a large percentage of AdBlock users. ↩
To fight against banner blindness, unscrupulous advertisers and publishers have created increasingly obnoxious or misleading ads, such as the common “One trick to a…” campaigns with hand drawn graphics. They are hand drawn because it makes them look less like ads (this won’t last forever). Likewise, some site’s templates have begun embedding ads that look like related articles at the bottom of the page, thus tricking you into believing that an ad is genuine content.
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Very Good

Cherry Hill, N.J. - Subaru of America, Inc., which has posted record-breaking sales every year for the past six years, today announced the introduction of the 2015 XV Crosstrek Special Edition. The Special Edition will be limited production of 1,000 models arriving into retailers in Spring 2015. Based on the well-equipped 2.0i Premium trim, the Special Edition is priced at $25,290 (plus $850 d&d).

The versatile, fun-to-drive XV Crosstrek combines bold five-door design, a highly capable chassis, best-in-class fuel economy and in-demand multimedia features. Standard Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive, high ground clearance (8.7 inches), 17-inch alloy wheels and ample room for passengers and cargo make the Subaru XV Crosstrek a high-capability crossover. It is one of the most fuel-efficient all-wheel-drive crossover utility vehicles in America, delivering 34-mpg EPA-estimated highway fuel economy. The XV Crosstrek small SUV has been a strong seller since its introduction in 2012 and is now Subaru's third best selling model.

For 2015, the Special Edition joins the XV Crosstrek line which includes the 2.0i base trim, 2.0i Premium, 2.0i Limited and the XV Crosstrek Hybrid.

Based from the 2.0i Premium trim, the Special Edition adds STARLINK™ Multimedia audio system. The STARLINK 7.0" system works through 7-inch touch screen display with multi-touch control that offers swipe and scrolling gesture control. This system offers 6-speaker audio and all of the features of the base system plus voice-activated controls; SiriusXM® Satellite Radio (subscription required); a vehicle information display; SMS text messaging, iTunes® Tagging capability and dual USB ports.

The Subaru XV Crosstrek looks the part of a rugged crossover and backs up its appearance with proven Subaru capability. Black side- and wheel-arch cladding, rocker spoiler and roof rails provide a rugged contrast to the body color. The raised ride height, body-color roof spoiler and unique-design 17-inch wheels bolster the Subaru XV Crosstrek model's go-anywhere stance and attitude. Dark-tint privacy glass is standard.

Additional features on the XV Crosstrek Special Edition include Power Moonroof, exclusive Sunrise Yellow exterior with body color foldable mirrors with integrated turn signals along with blackened headlight bezels. As standard, the Special Edition offers Keyless Access with Push-Button Start as well as Pin Code Access, leather-wrapped shift lever handle and steering wheel.

With raised four-wheel independent suspension, the model's 8.7 inches of ground clearance is higher than most other crossovers and even some dedicated SUVs, yet the XV Crosstrek offers a comfortably low step-in height. High-strength suspension components improve agility, and hydraulic engine mounts help to damp out vibration. The double-wishbone rear suspension helps to enhance the blend of ride comfort, straight-line stability, handling agility and vehicle response.

Available exclusively with Subaru's Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT), Special Editions include the Subaru Incline Start Assist feature, which can briefly hold the vehicle while the driver pulls away from a stop on a hill. New transmission logic for 2015 includes stepped shifting under heavy throttle conditions. A standard ECO gauge helps the driver to operate the vehicle as economically as possible. All-Weather Package (heated front seats, heated exterior mirrors and windshield wiper de-icer) is also included as standard.

The CVT continuously and smoothly adapts to performance demand, helping to keep the engine in its most efficient operating range. A 6-speed manual mode with steering wheel paddle shifters allows the driver to control the transmission via six pre-set ratios. The transmission also allows "second gear" starts in order to limit the likelihood of wheel spin on slippery surfaces.

The FB 2.0-liter Subaru BOXER engine uses aluminum for the cylinder block and heads. The long-stroke configuration (84 mm bore and 90 mm stroke) enhances torque across the engine speed range. A dual overhead-cam (DOHC) configuration features Dual Active Valve Control System (DAVCS) – variable valve control for both intake and exhaust valves – also optimizing torque delivery. The engine produces 148 hp at 6,200 rpm and 145 lb.-ft. of peak torque at 4,200 rpm. Electric power steering reduces draw on engine power and for 2015 features a quicker steering ratio for 2.8 turns lock to lock.

A 103.7-inch wheelbase yields impressive interior roominess in the Subaru XV Crosstrek, including 35.4 inches of rear seat legroom. With the standard 60/40 split rear seatbacks folded, this versatile five-door crossover provides a flat load floor and up to 51.9 cubic feet of carrying space. Three golf bags or a large baby stroller can be easily loaded.

The sporty instrument panel and 3-spoke steering wheel are augmented in all XV Crosstrek models by a multi-function display with a trip computer located in the center of the dashboard. Soft-touch materials for the dashboard, door trim and center console armrest provide a high-quality feel. Front seats are optimized for a rear-end collision and feature tilt-adjustable head restraints for comfort. Large door pockets can hold plastic drink bottles and maps. Numerous compartments located in and around the center console hold all manner of today's personal items, such as phones, USB drives and MP3 players.

Models equipped with the Lineartronic CVT feature the Active Torque Split version of Symmetrical AWD. An electronically managed continuously variable transfer clutch actively manages torque distribution based on acceleration, deceleration, and available traction. The Active Torque Split system automatically transfers more torque (up to 100 percent) to the wheels with the best grip should slippage occur.

Vehicle Dynamics Control (VDC) combines stability and traction control functions and integrates a rollover sensor. Traction control works to augment Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive functionality. A VDC "Off" switch is useful for driving out of slushy roads, deep snow or gravel. The "Off" position deactivates the system's torque-reduction control, while the antilock and traction control remain active. Traction control functions as a second line of defense against wheel slip, after Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive. Traction control is not the means of torque distribution in a Subaru AWD system, as it is on some other all-wheel drive vehicles.

About Subaru of America, Inc.
Subaru of America, Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. of Japan. Headquartered at a zero-landfill office in Cherry Hill, N.J., the company markets and distributes Subaru vehicles, parts and accessories through a network of more than 600 retailers across the United States. All Subaru products are manufactured in zero-landfill production plants and Subaru of Indiana Automotive Inc. is the only U.S. automobile production plant to be designated a backyard wildlife habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. For additional information, visit media.subaru.com.
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Good

With plummeting gasoline prices across the country, motorists are logging more miles on US roads. That increase in driving means more people will likely die in traffic accidents, and a sharp drop in gas prices may correlate to a historic rise in road deaths.

Guangqing Chi, a sociology professor at South Dakota State University, tells National Public Radio that a $2-per-gallon decrease in gas prices could lead to an additional 9,000 traffic deaths, though in a conversation with Autoblog, Chi emphasized that is a worst-case scenario.

Should such a projection come to fruition, the spike would be a tremendous blow to long-term efforts to eradicate traffic fatalities. An additional 9,000 deaths would represent a 27.5 percent increase over the 32,719 people who were killed in traffic accidents in 2013, the latest year for which data is available.

A direct relationship between overall economic health and traffic deaths exists, says Russ Rader, spokesperson for the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Researchers have noted deaths rise during booms and decrease during recessions. But the fluctuations have been much smaller, and he says it's unlikely that gas prices alone would have such a pronounced impact.

Traffic fatalities have declined in seven of the past eight years, and the annual number hasn't topped 40,000 since 2007. On a percentage basis, a 27.5 percent increase would be the sharpest annual jump since 1917, when deaths rose by 22.4 percent at the dawn of the automobile era.

It's unclear how many more miles Americans would need to drive as a result of the gas-price plunge to reach the 9,000 figure, but Chi said the projection is based on other factors beyond vehicle miles traveled. His projection stems from previous research he and colleagues conducted that examined the relationship between crash deaths and gas prices in Minnesota and Mississippi.

Among other conclusions, the study noted the consequences would disproportionately affect rural residents and commuters. A spike could also disproportionately affect teenage drivers, who are more likely to alter their driving habits based on gas prices, Chi said. Conversely, drivers ages 25 to 34 could see almost no impact, because they're committed to job responsibilities and family needs.

Gas prices have dramatically fallen from a high national average of $3.70 per gallon, but they haven't fallen by $2 per gallon, at least not yet. The current national average is $2.19 per gallon, according to AAA's Daily Fuel Gauge Report.

And the drop may be short-lived. In an exclusive interview with The Detroit News, President Obama said yesterday the bargain prices aren't expected to last.

"The American people should not believe that ... demand for oil by China and India and all these emerging countries is going to stay flat," Obama told the newspaper. "Just demographics tell us demand is going to continue to grow, that over the long term it will grow faster than supply and we have to be smart about our energy policy."

Bad news for drivers who have enjoyed the extra cash in their wallets, but potentially life-saving overall.
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Very Good

The generous, civilized part of me worries for a moment that absconding with the new-best Corvette might have left one of my fellow journalists without a car. But the selfish part of me – the part largely in control of the rocket-launcher of a throttle under my right foot ­– says "screw it."

I spent two days with the 2015 Chevy Corvette Z06, a monster of a sports car that will soon be dominating track days everywhere, and I never once was inclined to share it. Hurtling through the shattered stillness of the desert and pulling big Gs at Spring Mountain circuit, I never felt overly disposed to give up my seat. This Corvette, more than any I've yet driven, was deep enough to hold my attention; for two days, for two years, probably.

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

With this Z06, the Corvette steps over the amazing-for-the-price category, and solidly into the best-cars-in-the-world zone. There are peripheral elements that remind me of its blue collar, Bowtie heritage, sure, but there's more that simply begs me to carry on driving... faster.

Most casual car observers will be able to pick the 2015 Z06 out from its less aggressive Stingray brothers. Subtler hints include a new, more open grille, larger extractor on the taller hood and rather discreet badges on the flanks of the car. More outrageous is the finned spoiler on the rear trunk lid, and the widebody look offered from flared fenders – an extra 1.57 inches (40 millimeters) at their beefiest point.

Even driving around performance-car-laden Pahrump, NV – loaded thanks to the very active community at the Spring Mountain racing resort – members of the local populace were turning heads, waving and generally noting the Z06 with approval when I drove through town.

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

In Torch Red over black painted aluminum wheels, staggered at 19-inches in front and 20 at the back, the amped-up Z06 hits a new level of road presence for the C7.

Sadly, while the $78,000-base Z06 may look and drive the part of a supercar killer on the outside, the revised interior can't quite follow suit.

Listen, I'm not going to be the guy that dogs the Corvette for having a cheap-feeling interior, this generation has put those once-legitimate claims to rest. But the Z06 additions to the cabin – badging on the steering wheel and seats and a slightly gauche "650 Horsepower / 650 LBS FT Torque" plaque on the center console among them – don't merit comparison to the Lamborghini, Ferrari and Porsche models that this car can compete with on the track.

If the Z06 has a flaw in its armor, the specialness of its cabin might be it. So be it.

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

From a comfort and function standpoint, I'd guess anyone at six-foot, three-inches, or shorter, will find a well-laid-out cabin with excellent controls. Even at a few inches taller than that, I enjoyed excellent forward and lateral visibility on the street (where I didn't have to wear a helmet), firm grip at my haunches from the snug sport seats, and joyful purchase on the thick-rimmed steering wheel. With the exception of a trunk-popping switch that long legged folks with hit with their knees a lot, the Z06 is Pretty Tall Guy approved. (Just not Really Tall Guy approved.)

Everyone with a beating heart should approve of the engine, on the other hand. If you've been following the rollout of this '15 Z06 even a little bit, you're sure to know that the supercharged LT4 V8 has been lovingly tuned to produce a staggering 650 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque. Those impressive numbers tell part of the story, but true illumination didn't come for me until I uncorked the sucker on those empty desert roads on the Nevada-California border.

Holy God.

I shot a Short Cut video (below) of the Z06 taking off at the track, which gives you some idea of the sound of the thing, at least. But the feeling in my chest when matting the throttle at 50 miles per hour in third gear is harder to document. You need to be behind the wheel or riding shotgun when the fuse is lit, to 'get' this LT4 with any accuracy.



The Z06's best 0-60 time of 2.95 seconds (for the eight-speed automatic cars, it's 3.2 seconds for the manual) puts it in league with products like the Lamborghini Huracán, McLaren 650S and Ferrari 458 Speciale. Its top speed of 195 mph may leave it just outside of the 200-mph club, but that's a vanity stat that real-world drivers and weekend racers can safely laugh off.

From the perspective of even very fast driving, having a hell of a good time and passing just about everything on the road, the LT4 is effectively infinite in terms of power and thrust.

Corvette powertrain engineers have wrought wonders under the hood of the Z06, then, but the chassis guys have created a technological masterpiece as well. The newest generation of the variable drive mode selection, which accesses systems like magnetic shocks, steering, throttle, transmission, traction and stability control and more, is a wonder of variety.

Selectable modes, listed in order of driving aggressiveness include Eco, Tour, Sport and Track, with a Weather mode for low-traction occasions, too. In and of themselves, the existence of such modes isn't new. What's impressive is the vast difference that each makes in terms of how this Corvette feels and reacts on the road.

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

Especially in terms of steering weight and feel, switching from, say, Eco to Sport is almost analogous to swapping from a Lexus to a Lotus. In the default Tour mode, the Z06 is one-finger-steerable, with a compliant suspension feel and in-cabin noise levels that could pass for "quiet" on smooth roads (rougher stuff produces a still-loud rumble from the wide, low-sidewall tires). Race, on the other hand, makes the magic-magnet suspenders so stiff as to be uncomfortable for long stretches, and the steering wheel heavy enough that I wanted both hands affixed all of the time.

Sport mode, not surprisingly then, is just the ticket for the type of grand touring driving that I love to do on great roads. The correct balance of a roaring exhaust, sharp throttle and clever handling exist here, and help to make the C7 Z06 exactly the kind of dual-purpose threat that previous generations of the nameplate couldn't quite manage.

The second half of that duality is, of course, any racing track you're lucky enough to drive it to. In my case, that was a tight-but-satisfying, 1.5-mile course laid out at Spring Mountain. If the Z06 came alive for me on the scything roads around Death Valley, it was here that the beast actually extended its claws.

The standard Z06 translates amazingly well to the track environment, as it should. It's a fluid, capable machine with excellent mechanical grip, strong brakes, and a balanced chassis that compliments the driver in just about every circumstance. There's still a fair amount of "Corvette" in this car, of course. Especially with traction control disabled and the variable ride settings clicked to "leave me the hell alone," it's on the pilot not to let the rear end get too loose, or overwhelmed with those rampaging horses.

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

But it's with the $7,995 Z07 package that the stunning track car turns into an unbelievable one. Ticking the Z07 box doesn't get you any extra power (and believe me, you don't need any), but it does transform the vehicle with carbon-ceramic brakes, super-sticky Michelin Pilot Super Sport Cup tires and a still-more-aggressive aero package.

The small track I drove on, with its relatively short back straight section, didn't allow me to get a great feel for the difference between the stock and the optional aero packages, but the difference in the tires and the braking power was pronounced.

I'm not a club racer, but as the day wore on, my laps in the Z07 cars became decisively quicker than those in the lesser Z06. Braking later (in some cases, much later) into corners, I was still able to toss the agile car precisely over most apexes and lay down power seamlessly on exit.

There are five levels of Corvette's Performance Traction Management settings that work within the drive modes, too: Wet, Dry, Sport 1, Sport 2 and Race. Even feeling pretty confident in my knowledge of the circuit and feel for the car, later in the day, switching over to Race and switching off traction and stability control had me sweaty palmed. I needn't have worried, as the setup left the Z06 slightly less forgiving of small mistakes, but still with enough tire to keep me confidently lapping.

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z062015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

Those that caught my writeup of the Stingray's new eight-speed automatic transmission this summer won't be surprised to read it, but the gem of the track day for me was a Z07-pack car with the autobox. No shit.

Here's the formula: select Track for drive mode, Race for traction management, and then slot the automatic's lever in straight D and ignore the shift paddles on the steering wheel. All of my fastest times turned that day were all with the configuration above. Thusly set, the Z06 does a kind of wonderful Nissan GT-R impression: shifting and gripping and going like a virtual racer straight from Forza, but with far more tactility and progressive handling up to the limit than I've ever felt behind the wheel of Godzilla.

The eight-speed isn't nearly so satisfying when shifting in manual mode, and, honestly, I still preferred the rev-matching seven-speed hand-shaker despite it being slower to use. If it were my Corvette to build, and even if I planned to track it regularly, I'd opt into the sweet manual with its easy clutch and clean, short throws. Still, there's no question that Chevrolet has two excellent transmission options here.
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Very Good

Ford Motor Company [NYSE: F] announced today changes in its senior leadership team as it continues to deliver and accelerate the company's One Ford plan while driving for product excellence and innovation.

John Felice, vice president, U.S. Marketing, Sales and Service, has elected to retire after
30 years at Ford, effective Feb. 1, 2015. Succeeding Felice is Mark LaNeve, currently chief operating officer at Global Team Ford, the global advertising and marketing agency for Ford Motor Company.

LaNeve, 55, will report jointly to Joe Hinrichs, executive vice president and president of The Americas, and to Stephen Odell, executive vice president, Global Marketing, Sales and Service.

"John has had a long and successful career as a key leader serving us around the world for more than 30 years," said Hinrichs. "Among his many contributions, John led the Ford brand revitalization in the U.S., resulting in an unprecedented improvement in customer favorability, and was a strong advocate for our dealers, ensuring their participation in our business planning process and further strengthening our relationship with them. We thank John for his many years of service and wish him all the best going forward."

Felice joined Ford in April 1984. During his tenure, he served in a variety of management positions in the Marketing, Sales and Service organization in both the U.S. and Asia Pacific including leading U.S. Ford and Lincoln Sales, U.S. Ford and Lincoln Marketing, and Asia Pacific Marketing, Sales and Service. While in Asia, he also served as president of Ford Thailand.

In succeeding Felice, LaNeve will be responsible for all marketing, sales, service and dealer relations in the United States. He will be focused on continuing to grow the business by building the Ford brand with innovative new digital communications and transforming the retail experience for customers.

"We are excited to have Mark join our team as we introduce even more new products to our customers this year," said Odell. "With nearly three decades of proven experience to draw upon, Mark brings the right skills to continue building the Ford brand while creating a stronger retail experience for our customers, making it even easier for them to interact with their dealer and with Ford – and helping us profitably grow."

LaNeve comes to Ford after several years leading the company's global advertising and marketing agency, Global Team Ford, where he was chief operating officer, since August 2012. In this role, LaNeve led not only Team Detroit, which serves the Ford brand in the U.S., but also the agency's operations in London, São Paulo and Shanghai, as well as Hudson Rouge, the Lincoln agency in New York City.

LaNeve has nearly three decades of global sales and marketing experience in the automotive and insurance industries, having served in senior roles at Team Detroit, General Motors, Volvo Cars and Allstate Insurance. In these roles, he led the development and execution of innovative sales programs and the resurgence of the brands.
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Good

John Felice is retiring as vice president, U.S. Marketing, Sales and Service, after 30 years of service

Mark LaNeve, named vice president, U.S. Marketing, Sales and Service and elected a Ford Motor Company officer; former chief operating officer at Global Team Ford brings nearly three decades of automotive marketing and sales experience to Ford

Ford Motor Company [NYSE: F] announced today changes in its senior leadership team as it continues to deliver and accelerate the company's One Ford plan while driving for product excellence and innovation.

John Felice, vice president, U.S. Marketing, Sales and Service, has elected to retire after
30 years at Ford, effective Feb. 1, 2015. Succeeding Felice is Mark LaNeve, currently chief operating officer at Global Team Ford, the global advertising and marketing agency for Ford Motor Company.

LaNeve, 55, will report jointly to Joe Hinrichs, executive vice president and president of The Americas, and to Stephen Odell, executive vice president, Global Marketing, Sales and Service.

"John has had a long and successful career as a key leader serving us around the world for more than 30 years," said Hinrichs. "Among his many contributions, John led the Ford brand revitalization in the U.S., resulting in an unprecedented improvement in customer favorability, and was a strong advocate for our dealers, ensuring their participation in our business planning process and further strengthening our relationship with them. We thank John for his many years of service and wish him all the best going forward."

Felice joined Ford in April 1984. During his tenure, he served in a variety of management positions in the Marketing, Sales and Service organization in both the U.S. and Asia Pacific including leading U.S. Ford and Lincoln Sales, U.S. Ford and Lincoln Marketing, and Asia Pacific Marketing, Sales and Service. While in Asia, he also served as president of Ford Thailand.

In succeeding Felice, LaNeve will be responsible for all marketing, sales, service and dealer relations in the United States. He will be focused on continuing to grow the business by building the Ford brand with innovative new digital communications and transforming the retail experience for customers.

"We are excited to have Mark join our team as we introduce even more new products to our customers this year," said Odell. "With nearly three decades of proven experience to draw upon, Mark brings the right skills to continue building the Ford brand while creating a stronger retail experience for our customers, making it even easier for them to interact with their dealer and with Ford – and helping us profitably grow."

LaNeve comes to Ford after several years leading the company's global advertising and marketing agency, Global Team Ford, where he was chief operating officer, since August 2012. In this role, LaNeve led not only Team Detroit, which serves the Ford brand in the U.S., but also the agency's operations in London, São Paulo and Shanghai, as well as Hudson Rouge, the Lincoln agency in New York City.

LaNeve has nearly three decades of global sales and marketing experience in the automotive and insurance industries, having served in senior roles at Team Detroit, General Motors, Volvo Cars and Allstate Insurance. In these roles, he led the development and execution of innovative sales programs and the resurgence of the brands.
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Very Good

Buying or building a home is a crucial decision as it is going to be one of the biggest investment you will ever make so it is important to make the right decision. So, everyone needs to preplanned & prepared for every process relating to Home like construction idea & site, buying, finance, loans, home designs,etc.That's why you need to know how to make a right decision & how to select a right Melbourne Home Builder. Here, are few steps that can guide in the decision making process of selecting the right home builder.
1. Make a list of possible builders
To start with, make a list of possible builders that can help you in the construction or home renovation project. While some builders construct a broad range of homes other specialize in only a specific type of home like starter homes or custom homes etc. So depending upon your needs, select a builder that build the kind of home you want for your family.
2. Ask for references
Ask the builder, to provide references of the homeowners with whom they have dealt or done the work. You can spare some time over a weekend and contact these people to know about their experience with them.
Ask them simple questions such as:
Do they complete the home on time as committed by them?
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Very Good

Typically you opt to have a social presence on sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ because you assume that doing so will help you reach a wider audience. If your site and these social properties are entirely separate spheres unto themselves however, you won’t capture the true value that they can offer.
It’s a mistake not to link back to your main site from these sites. That’s obvious. What might not be so obvious, is that it’s also a mistake not to promote these social properties from within your blog. In fact, properties such as your Facebook fan page, can help show your visitors that you are more than just an anonymous, faceless company. If you do a good job on these social sites, you can demonstrate how you interact with your community of customers and fans, to prospective customers.
Linking to your social properties also acts as social proof. When someone sees a large number of fans or followers, it leads them to consider you as being more authoritative, established, or worth following as well. And since you are showcasing these properties to your blog visitors, this will in turn boost these numbers and increase further your social proof.
Sahaya Derik
 
Jan 8, 2015

Very Good

Very Good
saranya
 
Jan 8, 2015

Very Good

Note: I, and this blog, are back after a hiatus caused by my recent cross country relocation, during which I shifted from life on the east coast to calling the beautiful west my new home. Now that I’m properly settled in, it’s high time we got back to business. Talk about bad timing though — my book went live as the moving truck was leaving.
Blogs are an excellent tool for promoting your startup or business. If you’re not careful however, it’s easy to end up putting in a lot of effort into something that yields little in the way of reward. The following is a series of common blogging pitfalls that entrepreneurs should be aware of and which you’ll want to address when it comes to your own blog.
Blogging mistake #1: Not prominently linking to your main site

It can be extremely irritating for visitors to arrive on your blog, and not have an easy way to reach your main site. Yes, the reader could remove blog. or /blog/ from their address bar, but you should work under the assumption that inertia is a strong force. If it takes more than a negligible effort, a large percentage of visitors won’t bother doing it.
One of the chief goals of your blog is to get people to check out your product. You need to make this process as easy as possible.
How to fix it
Link to the homepage or landing page of your choice from within your navigation bar. Home should link to your main site’s homepage, not your blog’s index. Call that link within the navigation bar Blog instead.
If your main site’s logo is present at the top of your blog template, have it link to the main site.
If the main site’s logo is not included in the template, add such a logo or a fairly good sized icon derived from it within your sidebar, then link that to the main site.
Finally, link generously to the product or service when you mention it, be it from a short description in your sidebar or from within your posts. You want a person to look at your blog for a second, blink, and immediately know where to click to check out your offer.
Blogging mistake #2: Not integrating with social properties

Typically you opt to have a social presence on sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ because you assume that doing so will help you reach a wider audience. If your site and these social properties are entirely separate spheres unto themselves however, you won’t capture the true value that they can offer.
It’s a mistake not to link back to your main site from these sites. That’s obvious. What might not be so obvious, is that it’s also a mistake not to promote these social properties from within your blog. In fact, properties such as your Facebook fan page, can help show your visitors that you are more than just an anonymous, faceless company. If you do a good job on these social sites, you can demonstrate how you interact with your community of customers and fans, to prospective customers.
Linking to your social properties also acts as social proof. When someone sees a large number of fans or followers, it leads them to consider you as being more authoritative, established, or worth following as well. And since you are showcasing these properties to your blog visitors, this will in turn boost these numbers and increase further your social proof.
Finally, it’s a mistake not to promote your blog posts on social properties. For example, when someone likes your fan page on Facebook, they subscribe to your updates there. By posting a link to your articles within that page on Facebook, you automatically reach visitors who may have otherwise vanished for good after their first visit to your blog.
How to fix it
Link to your main site from social media properties that allow you to do so.
Add a Facebook Like widget, a Twitter follow button, and +1 button to your sidebar. Note that this Facebook widget should be used to get people to like your fan page (therefore subscribing to your updates) and not your site. Specify the former URL, rather than the latter, when configuring the widget. Show faces when it comes to Facebook, as they are very effective at helping you immediately connect and capture the interest of your readers (after all, you’re showing them faces of their friends who like you, a quasi-direct endorsement for you).
Post a link to your new posts on all of your chosen target properties. TwitterFeed is one of many available tools that can take care of automatically posting your RSS to social sites (currently, both Twitter and Facebook are covered). But even doing it manually, if you so choose to, does not take much of your time.
Include a widget such as AddThis or ShareThis within your template, so that your individual posts can be liked, shared on Twitter, and posted on a variety of other sites by your readers. If possible, favor quality over quantity and opt for buttons that include counters (again, for social proof).
Blogging mistake #3: Making it harder to subscribe to, and regularly follow, your blog

Blogs that don’t make it easy to subscribe to new content rarely achieve a great deal of success. These day, browsers like Firefox and Chrome even ignore auto-discovered syndication feeds, making the process of subscription much harder.
You might think that RSS doesn’t matter anymore. In truth it does matter — more than most people assume actually. Even conceding for a second that your prospective customers are not the right demographic for feeds, you still need to provide and promote ways for them to keep up with your new content. You simply cannot expect them to come back to your site periodically.
How to fix it
Keep track of your subscription stats via FeedBurner.
Have a large orange RSS icon linked to your feed URL (see mine as an example).
Include a way to receive your new posts via email. You can use FeedBurner (enable it through Publicize -> Email Subscriptions) or much more ideally, set up your own mailing list with a service like Mailchimp (that’s what I use and I highly recommend it). Mailing lists are one of the biggest assets you can have as a business, virtually regardless of what you do. Set one up even if your crowd is technical. Include the signup widget near the top of your template, like I’ve done here in the sidebar. You can then setup an RSS-to-email campaign within Mailchimp to have your new posts automatically appear in your subscribers’ inboxes.
At the bottom of your posts invite readers to subscribe either via RSS or by email. You can generally accomplish this by modifying a template file or using the option to do so (if provided) within your blog’s software. For this blog, I use a plugin for the Genesis framework (i.e., Simple Hooks).
Blogging mistake #4: Only blogging about product announcements

While you certainly should use your blog to talk about and promote your products, unless you have more than one blog, it would be a big mistake to focus your site just on announcements about your products. You’d be missing out on the true marketing power of your blog if you went this route.
How to fix it
Write for the audience you want to attract. If you prospective SaaS customers are people who intend to lose weight, don’t spend 90% of your blog time discussing cool features you introduced in your app. Instead, write about topics that interest this particular demographic such as weight loss, fat burning, healthy foods, lean mass gain, etc. This way you’ll gather a community around that topic. Make it the blog that absolutely anyone who is losing weight should follow, whether they use your app or not. All the readers that you’ll attract will be exposed to your product either by sheer branding (ergo the importance of logos and links in the template mentioned previously) or by following your blog regularly, and then ending up reading your occasional bona fide product announcements.
Even when announcing a feature or posting about a product promotion, try to focus on how this will benefit the reader. Tell a story. Don’t just write a dry announcement. For example, if you are talking about an Android version of your app for dieters, talk about how stressful it is to try and keep track of calories when dining on the go, and how this new addition to your product line up will facilitate the lives of those who use your product.
Focusing on providing value for your readers, rather than just pushing a sale, will greatly help you increase your business. This will in fact make you come across as more trustworthy and genuine, as well as help you establish yourself as an expert in your field. If I trust you and consider you to be an expert, I’m willing to buy from you and your recommendations.
Have a small blurb or banner ad for your products at the bottom of your posts, rather than each post just being an ad itself for your products.
Blogging mistake #5: Hiding what your product is about

I hate it when I’m five minutes into a post of a startup, and I have no idea what these guys actually do or what they’re trying to sell me. This is far more common than it should be.
How to fix it
Have a small description at the top of your blog (typically in the sidebar) that explains who you are and what you do. (e.g., “Acme Fat Loss” is a web application that helps you lose weight by tracking calories and suggesting recipes that are within your daily calorie allotment”).
If your post has anything to do with your product, quickly introduce what your product does within your post. Don’t just assume everyone knows. For example, “The investment we received means that we’ll be able to allocate far more resources to the development of our calorie tracker and healthy recipe generator application”.
These are not by any means the only mistakes businesses do when trying to succeed at blogging. They are however some of the major, and perhaps most common, ones. Thankfully simple, effective fixes, as shown, are far from hard to implement and can be such a massive boon to you and your company.
Tresa John J

Dec 23, 2014
Some What to Get that
6 Reasons Why the Amazon Associates Affiliate Program Is Highly Underrated
June 25, 2012 By Antonio Cangiano 47 Comments

58
Amazon Associates
It is natural for bloggers who start to gather a following to consider revenue opportunities to reward their time and effort.
Google AdSense is a popular option for its plug and play nature. Sadly, it tends to be a disappointing source of income for most bloggers. The average RPM (revenue per thousand impressions of an ad) is fairly low in most niches, so you won’t get much side income from AdSense unless you have a very large audience. For example, if you average $3 RPM, you need a thousand visitors per day to pay for your daily latte (or more if you frequent Starbucks).
Bloggers who look around and explore their options a little more in-depth, may find the lucrative world of affiliate marketing. It’s a simple idea really. Imagine that I create a product and then want you to help me sell as many of it as possible. You, the affiliate, will promote the product for me through your blog. When a sale is made thanks to you (we’ll track that through a special link and browser cookies), I’ll give a portion of that sale to you. The percentage varies but it can be very high, with 50% being the norm for digital products.
If you are unscrupulous you could promote all sort of junk to make a buck, whether you honestly think it’s worth recommending or not. You could even promote products that you down right know suck, and still get your cut. And it turns out people actually do just this. As a result, affiliate marketers have a very bad reputation, despite there being nothing inherently wrong with receiving money for providing a marketing service.
Amazon Associates was one of the earliest and, currently, largest affiliate programs around. The operating margins are much smaller for Amazon, so the percentage that you get for each sale is rather small compared to that of most products online. We’re talking about 4-8.50% for most items, instead of the 50-75% you’d get from other digital products you could be promoting. Furthermore, with Amazon you don’t generally receive recurring referral revenue like you do with other digital products that charge a monthly fee and not a one-off fee.
Amazon’s operating agreement also requires you to be above-board when it comes to the way you go about promoting their products. Other affiliate programs online may gladly close one eye on your techniques if you are moving sales and making them money.
To further make Amazon less appealing to some affiliates, the referral cookie only lasts 24 hours, versus 30 or 60 days, which is common for online sales of digital products. This means that if you refer someone to Amazon.com today, and they were to buy a product three days from now, you won’t be getting anything at all. With more common affiliate relationships, you’d be getting a cut even if the user were to make a purchasing decision a month and a half after the first visit you generated (assuming that they didn’t clear their cookies, that is).
As a result, Amazon Associates is often ignored or berated by large affiliates. In fact it’s even a much underrated revenue option among bloggers. Amazon, and not AdSense, should be the first go-to option for bloggers looking to earn some money from their blogs. Amazon Associates is, and has been for years now, my number one source of blogging income.
To make this case, below I list a series of reasons why I recommend giving Amazon Associates a serious shot, despite its shortcomings.
Reason #1: Amazon Associates is straightforward and dependable

Once you sign up and provide the details of how you’d like to be paid (cheque, direct deposit, or gift certificate) you’ll receive your payments once you’ve reached or crossed the pre-established threshold limit (e.g., $100, with a two month delay for the payment). If you move enough sales, after two months, you’ll be receiving a steady monthly paycheck from them.
Other affiliate programs can make you jump through hoops to sign up and get approved (e.g., eBay’s affiliate program), or may require certain conditions to be met before issuing payments (e.g., ClickBank’s requirement for five different credit card purchases before releasing the funds, which progressively reduces the amount that you’re owed over time until you get those five separate credit card payments).
Reason #2: Amazon’s cookie has site-wide coverage, and is not just limited to a specific product

Yes, you only get a 24-hour window, but in that timeframe you’ll get a cut of anything a referred visitor buys, not just the product you pointed out to them. I’ve had visitors buy all sorts of expensive and odd items when they left my site to check out a $10 book on Amazon. And trust me, pink vibrators can add up quickly. :)
Reason #3: Amazon has a humongous inventory of extremely reputable products

You don’t have to promote “belly fat secrets” on your blog to make a buck. Their huge selection of high-quality books and other products, means that you can be selective and only recommend or point out items you truly believe are worth your readers’ time and investment. You can select books that are entirely relevant to your topic of expertise, and review products you have actually read/tried/consumed.
Reason #4: People trust Amazon

Being such a well established household name implies that most of your visitors won’t think twice about putting a purchase through on Amazon. Many will have accounts already, and perhaps even have their credit card stored on the site for quick checkouts. This in turn means that more people will buy instead of second guessing whether it’s safe to use the shopping cart.
Reason #5: Amazon is a master at converting visitors into customers

Amazon spends millions of dollars in research to optimize the amount of sales they squeeze out of new and existing customers. All you really need to do is send people to Amazon and they’ll do a good job themselves for the most part. Of course, if you are considered a trustworthy expert in your field and you send people to Amazon to check out a specific item, your conversion rate will be even higher.
Reason #6: The percentage of your cut raises in a given month, as you sell more items

The more products you sell, the greater the percentage of your total sales will be awarded to you. You start at a very low 4%, but can reach the 8% range in a relatively short amount of time (if your sales are good).
Amazon volume rates
I strongly encourage you to give Amazon Associates a go.
Update: Several people wrote me asking for further details on how to make money with the Amazon Associates program. I’ll repeat here what I suggested privately via email:
Niche Profit Course by Chris Guthrie. This video course on Amazon Associates is amazing and I highly recommend it to anyone. It’s full of legitimate information on how to make a lot of extra income from your site through Amazon. I’ve taken several courses on the subject and this is the best one in my opinion.
In my book on technical blogging, I go in-depth about techniques that can help ensure that you get most out of this program (including statistics about my income, if you need further guidance to maximize your own earnings).
The Easy Azon plugin is super-handy and a time saver if you plan to feature Amazon links in your WordPress-based blog or site.
5 Common Blogging Mistakes Made by Startups
June 22, 2012 By Antonio Cangiano 20 Comments

51
Note: I, and this blog, are back after a hiatus caused by my recent cross country relocation, during which I shifted from life on the east coast to calling the beautiful west my new home. Now that I’m properly settled in, it’s high time we got back to business. Talk about bad timing though — my book went live as the moving truck was leaving.
Blogs are an excellent tool for promoting your startup or business. If you’re not careful however, it’s easy to end up putting in a lot of effort into something that yields little in the way of reward. The following is a series of common blogging pitfalls that entrepreneurs should be aware of and which you’ll want to address when it comes to your own blog.
Blogging mistake #1: Not prominently linking to your main site

It can be extremely irritating for visitors to arrive on your blog, and not have an easy way to reach your main site. Yes, the reader could remove blog. or /blog/ from their address bar, but you should work under the assumption that inertia is a strong force. If it takes more than a negligible effort, a large percentage of visitors won’t bother doing it.
One of the chief goals of your blog is to get people to check out your product. You need to make this process as easy as possible.
How to fix it
Link to the homepage or landing page of your choice from within your navigation bar. Home should link to your main site’s homepage, not your blog’s index. Call that link within the navigation bar Blog instead.
If your main site’s logo is present at the top of your blog template, have it link to the main site.
If the main site’s logo is not included in the template, add such a logo or a fairly good sized icon derived from it within your sidebar, then link that to the main site.
Finally, link generously to the product or service when you mention it, be it from a short description in your sidebar or from within your posts. You want a person to look at your blog for a second, blink, and immediately know where to click to check out your offer.
Blogging mistake #2: Not integrating with social properties

Typically you opt to have a social presence on sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ because you assume that doing so will help you reach a wider audience. If your site and these social properties are entirely separate spheres unto themselves however, you won’t capture the true value that they can offer.
It’s a mistake not to link back to your main site from these sites. That’s obvious. What might not be so obvious, is that it’s also a mistake not to promote these social properties from within your blog. In fact, properties such as your Facebook fan page, can help show your visitors that you are more than just an anonymous, faceless company. If you do a good job on these social sites, you can demonstrate how you interact with your community of customers and fans, to prospective customers.
Linking to your social properties also acts as social proof. When someone sees a large number of fans or followers, it leads them to consider you as being more authoritative, established, or worth following as well. And since you are showcasing these properties to your blog visitors, this will in turn boost these numbers and increase further your social proof.
Finally, it’s a mistake not to promote your blog posts on social properties. For example, when someone likes your fan page on Facebook, they subscribe to your updates there. By posting a link to your articles within that page on Facebook, you automatically reach visitors who may have otherwise vanished for good after their first visit to your blog.
How to fix it
Link to your main site from social media properties that allow you to do so.
Add a Facebook Like widget, a Twitter follow button, and +1 button to your sidebar. Note that this Facebook widget should be used to get people to like your fan page (therefore subscribing to your updates) and not your site. Specify the former URL, rather than the latter, when configuring the widget. Show faces when it comes to Facebook, as they are very effective at helping you immediately connect and capture the interest of your readers (after all, you’re showing them faces of their friends who like you, a quasi-direct endorsement for you).
Post a link to your new posts on all of your chosen target properties. TwitterFeed is one of many available tools that can take care of automatically posting your RSS to social sites (currently, both Twitter and Facebook are covered). But even doing it manually, if you so choose to, does not take much of your time.
Include a widget such as AddThis or ShareThis within your template, so that your individual posts can be liked, shared on Twitter, and posted on a variety of other sites by your readers. If possible, favor quality over quantity and opt for buttons that include counters (again, for social proof).
Blogging mistake #3: Making it harder to subscribe to, and regularly follow, your blog

Blogs that don’t make it easy to subscribe to new content rarely achieve a great deal of success. These day, browsers like Firefox and Chrome even ignore auto-discovered syndication feeds, making the process of subscription much harder.
You might think that RSS doesn’t matter anymore. In truth it does matter — more than most people assume actually. Even conceding for a second that your prospective customers are not the right demographic for feeds, you still need to provide and promote ways for them to keep up with your new content. You simply cannot expect them to come back to your site periodically.
How to fix it
Keep track of your subscription stats via FeedBurner.
Have a large orange RSS icon linked to your feed URL (see mine as an example).
Include a way to receive your new posts via email. You can use FeedBurner (enable it through Publicize -> Email Subscriptions) or much more ideally, set up your own mailing list with a service like Mailchimp (that’s what I use and I highly recommend it). Mailing lists are one of the biggest assets you can have as a business, virtually regardless of what you do. Set one up even if your crowd is technical. Include the signup widget near the top of your template, like I’ve done here in the sidebar. You can then setup an RSS-to-email campaign within Mailchimp to have your new posts automatically appear in your subscribers’ inboxes.
At the bottom of your posts invite readers to subscribe either via RSS or by email. You can generally accomplish this by modifying a template file or using the option to do so (if provided) within your blog’s software. For this blog, I use a plugin for the Genesis framework (i.e., Simple Hooks).
Blogging mistake #4: Only blogging about product announcements

While you certainly should use your blog to talk about and promote your products, unless you have more than one blog, it would be a big mistake to focus your site just on announcements about your products. You’d be missing out on the true marketing power of your blog if you went this route.
How to fix it
Write for the audience you want to attract. If you prospective SaaS customers are people who intend to lose weight, don’t spend 90% of your blog time discussing cool features you introduced in your app. Instead, write about topics that interest this particular demographic such as weight loss, fat burning, healthy foods, lean mass gain, etc. This way you’ll gather a community around that topic. Make it the blog that absolutely anyone who is losing weight should follow, whether they use your app or not. All the readers that you’ll attract will be exposed to your product either by sheer branding (ergo the importance of logos and links in the template mentioned previously) or by following your blog regularly, and then ending up reading your occasional bona fide product announcements.
Even when announcing a feature or posting about a product promotion, try to focus on how this will benefit the reader. Tell a story. Don’t just write a dry announcement. For example, if you are talking about an Android version of your app for dieters, talk about how stressful it is to try and keep track of calories when dining on the go, and how this new addition to your product line up will facilitate the lives of those who use your product.
Focusing on providing value for your readers, rather than just pushing a sale, will greatly help you increase your business. This will in fact make you come across as more trustworthy and genuine, as well as help you establish yourself as an expert in your field. If I trust you and consider you to be an expert, I’m willing to buy from you and your recommendations.
Have a small blurb or banner ad for your products at the bottom of your posts, rather than each post just being an ad itself for your products.
Blogging mistake #5: Hiding what your product is about

I hate it when I’m five minutes into a post of a startup, and I have no idea what these guys actually do or what they’re trying to sell me. This is far more common than it should be.
How to fix it
Have a small description at the top of your blog (typically in the sidebar) that explains who you are and what you do. (e.g., “Acme Fat Loss” is a web application that helps you lose weight by tracking calories and suggesting recipes that are within your daily calorie allotment”).
If your post has anything to do with your product, quickly introduce what your product does within your post. Don’t just assume everyone knows. For example, “The investment we received means that we’ll be able to allocate far more resources to the development of our calorie tracker and healthy recipe generator application”.
These are not by any means the only mistakes businesses do when trying to succeed at blogging. They are however some of the major, and perhaps most common, ones. Thankfully simple, effective fixes, as shown, are far from hard to implement and can be such a massive boon to you and your company.
saranya
 
Jan 8, 2015

Verdict

I often argue that professionals should share their knowledge online via blogging.
The catch is that virtually anything worthwhile in life takes time and effort, and blogging is not an exception to this statement. So before committing your energy to such an endeavor, you may rightfully stop and wonder what’s in it for you. Is blogging really worth it?
In this article, I briefly illustrate some of the main benefits that directly derive from running a technical blog.
1. Blogging can improve your communication skills
Communication and writing, much like programming, are skills honed through countless hours of practice. As you work hard at articulating your thoughts into words, you’ll find that the process ends up improving your ability to express yourself. And communication is key, almost regardless of your profession.
Over time, you’ll become a faster and better technical writer, who’s able to come up with an insightful essay or tutorial in just an hour or two.
Even better, you’ll be able to concisely formulate confusing or undefined thoughts into exact words. Vague thoughts that you considered in your head will either prove to be valid and gain strength throughout the process of formalizing them into words, or quickly fall apart as flawed ideas once you see them on the screen.
This habit will make you not only a better communicator, but also a better, clearer thinker.
2. Blogging can improve your technical skills
One of the most successful learning technique I know is to try to teach what you’re currently learning yourself to other people.
The process of explaining something to others quickly solidifies your knowledge and outlines its shortcomings, exposing your own doubts about the material you’re studying. This is why writing down and paraphrasing a book, something bright student often do, is a powerful technique that helps retain and clarify your understanding of the information you’re gathering.
As a blogger, you are likely to improve your technical skills because you are forced to research further topics in order to properly share them with the public. You might be corrected by commenters who know more about the subject than you do, and learn a lot from them in the process. As well you may learn more as others expand on what you had to say within their blogs, or perhaps force you to answer more questions about the topic than you thought about in the first place.
As I mentioned in my book, blogging is just as much as teaching as it is about starting a conversation. These conversations will often help increase your expertise and well-roundedness.
The collaborative power of blogging was truly highlighted and pushed to the limit by the Fields medalist Professor Timothy Gowers with his Polymath Project, in which his blog and commenting section was used to figure out unsolved mathematical problems collaboratively.
3. Blogging can provide you with a repository for your knowledge
Some people like to use personal wikis for this purpose, but blogging can be an excellent way to keep track of information you intend to retrieve at a later stage. For example many programmers use their own old posts to find particular snippets of code, the exact steps to configure a server, or a given URL for a useful service they blogged about.
At times you’ll find that googling for a given problem will bring up an article from your own blog that you may very well have forgotten about. (And if that post doesn’t solve your problem, you can curse your past self for not providing more details back when you wrote it.)
Looking back at your old posts is also a great way to keep track of progress, and have access to a timeline of what you were dealing with, thinking, and doing at a given moment in the past. It’s fun to look back once in a while and introspect about how far you’ve come. This can often provide you with glimpses of insight about where your career and professional interests are headed.
4. Blogging can help make powerful connections
Technical blogging injects you into an online community of fellow professionals who are passionate about the topic they are writing about. If you are contributing valuable information and insight, and link to others, you’ll likely end up on the radar of these people, and ultimately connect with other world class players in your field.
Blogging is certainly cheaper than flying across the world non-stop to meet all these folks at expensive conferences (though blogging is not a substitute for in-person human interaction).
Society functions through people interacting, connecting, and networking. How you use this opportunity is up to you, but it can definitely be a boost for your career, business, or even life in general to be in touch with other experts in the field of your choice.
5. Blogging can help you make friends
Even better than powerful acquaintances are friends. As a prominent blogger you’ll get to meet and interact with a wealth of people online. If you’re social and available to others, you’ll end up making friends (influential and less influential ones alike) online.
I’ve lost count of how many people I’ve come to know thanks to my technical blogs.
Sometimes it’s a case of someone who comments often and you get to know them better through this route. Other times it is a fellow blogger. Often, it’s someone who noticed you through your blog and gets in touch via email. If you are fairly popular in your field, you may even get the occasional ego boosting, “Oh, I follow your blog” when introducing yourself at meetups or trade conferences.
6. Blogging can provide you with a second income
Most bloggers live under the false assumption that you can’t make serious money from running a blog on the side. They understand that if you dedicate yourself full-time, there is money to be made, but they severely underestimate how much revenue you can generate with just a couple of hours of your time per week. They’ve tried or heard horror stories from people making mere pennies with AdSense, and assume that they can’t monetize their own blog unless they’re really famous.
A few hundred dollars a month from your blog is absolutely within the reach of any professional out there. If you do everything right, and put in the work required, your blog can even make you thousands of dollars, both directly and indirectly.
My technical blogs make me a few thousand dollars every month, and I often end up not touching them for weeks at the time. Blogging is not passive income, but if you know what you are doing, all the content you produce compounds and ends up providing you with a substantial income – even when you neglect the blog for a few weeks or months at a time.
Blogging can provide you with some serious extra income that you can then use to finance your hobby, buy gadgets, pay off debt, or do whatever else you desire. It’s a really nice feeling to receive a few extra checks each month, and it will further motivate you to continue blogging.
In my book I cover in great detail how I go about monetizing my blogs, but I’ll also talk more about this subject on this site (subscribe via feed or email if you’d like to be notified of such future articles).
7. Blogging can score you freebies
Publishers and PR firms have become aware of the influence bloggers have on targeted audiences. Even as a mildly successful blogger, you can expect to be contacted by a multitude of people offering you freebies. Depending on your niche and field, these offers will typically be for books, but it’s not uncommon to receive offers for other items, including tickets for conferences, gadgets, software, etc.
As long as you disclose your affiliation (in a way that makes the FTC happy), it’s actually very nice to routinely receive freebies of this kind. If you like what you receive, you can then blog about that product and review it for your readers.
Often, if you establish good relationships with publishers and PR firms, you can even organize giveaway contests which benefit your readers, not just yourself.
8. Blogging can advance your career
A few of the previous benefits I mentioned have already revealed how blogging can have a positive impact in your career. However, I’d like to stress just how much blogging can open certain doors for you. Every post you make is a new opportunity to get people to notice you on a professional level.
Because of my blogs, but primarily my programming one, I’ve received countless job offers over the years, including some from a selection of the largest and most sought after companies in the world. Some offered me generous relocation packages to the US, and a few went so far as to offer me the job, no questions asked (e.g., they didn’t even require a formal interview, they had sized me up enough through my blog writing).
I got my job at IBM in Canada mainly thanks to my blog (at the time I was still in Europe).
Whether blogging allows you to find a new job, customers, partners, investors, publishers who are interested in having you authoring a book, or something else entirely, it is certainly a great career booster.
In fact, my number one piece of advice for new professionals who are interested in building their careers is to start blogging today.
9. Blogging can make you popular in your field
Most professionals work hard because they want to be successful and gain recogniztion in their field. Blogging aides with that and can make small celebrities out of regular professionals. For those in the tech world, this is not an uncommon occurrence. Names like Joel Spolsky, Derek Sivers, Steve Yegge, and Scott Hanselman come to mind.
I’m reminded of Joey Roth’s “Charlatan, Martyr, Hustler” poster. If you do incredible work but nobody knows about it you are a martyr. If you accomplish nothing and do no work, but talk a sweet talk, you are a charlatan. If you can walk the walk, and talk the talk, then you are a hustler.
Blogging helps you ensure that you can talk the talk and reach the right audience, once you have walked the walk.
10. Blogging can help you reach and teach a wide audience
The number one reason to blog for many people, is the desire to share their knowledge and teach others.
For some, even in the technical realm, it’s a matter of politics. For example, an Agile development professional may actually want to influence the community and advocate his theories and ideas about the process of developing software, so that they (potentially) become widespread.
Others, may use this teaching tool to promote their technical projects. An example, also from the software development world, is blogging to help people become aware, loyal, and eventually proficient in an open source tool that you created.

As you can imagine, these are just some of the many benefits of blogging. As you begin creating your own blog posts, you’ll likely find that some of them fall into place organically, whereas you need to work at others. All however, stand to enrich your career and life, and help inspire you to keep blogging for years to come.
saranya
 
Jan 8, 2015

Very Good

I often argue that professionals should share their knowledge online via blogging.
The catch is that virtually anything worthwhile in life takes time and effort, and blogging is not an exception to this statement. So before committing your energy to such an endeavor, you may rightfully stop and wonder what’s in it for you. Is blogging really worth it?
In this article, I briefly illustrate some of the main benefits that directly derive from running a technical blog.
1. Blogging can improve your communication skills
Communication and writing, much like programming, are skills honed through countless hours of practice. As you work hard at articulating your thoughts into words, you’ll find that the process ends up improving your ability to express yourself. And communication is key, almost regardless of your profession.
Over time, you’ll become a faster and better technical writer, who’s able to come up with an insightful essay or tutorial in just an hour or two.
Even better, you’ll be able to concisely formulate confusing or undefined thoughts into exact words. Vague thoughts that you considered in your head will either prove to be valid and gain strength throughout the process of formalizing them into words, or quickly fall apart as flawed ideas once you see them on the screen.
This habit will make you not only a better communicator, but also a better, clearer thinker.
2. Blogging can improve your technical skills
One of the most successful learning technique I know is to try to teach what you’re currently learning yourself to other people.
The process of explaining something to others quickly solidifies your knowledge and outlines its shortcomings, exposing your own doubts about the material you’re studying. This is why writing down and paraphrasing a book, something bright student often do, is a powerful technique that helps retain and clarify your understanding of the information you’re gathering.
As a blogger, you are likely to improve your technical skills because you are forced to research further topics in order to properly share them with the public. You might be corrected by commenters who know more about the subject than you do, and learn a lot from them in the process. As well you may learn more as others expand on what you had to say within their blogs, or perhaps force you to answer more questions about the topic than you thought about in the first place.
As I mentioned in my book, blogging is just as much as teaching as it is about starting a conversation. These conversations will often help increase your expertise and well-roundedness.
The collaborative power of blogging was truly highlighted and pushed to the limit by the Fields medalist Professor Timothy Gowers with his Polymath Project, in which his blog and commenting section was used to figure out unsolved mathematical problems collaboratively.
3. Blogging can provide you with a repository for your knowledge
Some people like to use personal wikis for this purpose, but blogging can be an excellent way to keep track of information you intend to retrieve at a later stage. For example many programmers use their own old posts to find particular snippets of code, the exact steps to configure a server, or a given URL for a useful service they blogged about.
At times you’ll find that googling for a given problem will bring up an article from your own blog that you may very well have forgotten about. (And if that post doesn’t solve your problem, you can curse your past self for not providing more details back when you wrote it.)
Looking back at your old posts is also a great way to keep track of progress, and have access to a timeline of what you were dealing with, thinking, and doing at a given moment in the past. It’s fun to look back once in a while and introspect about how far you’ve come. This can often provide you with glimpses of insight about where your career and professional interests are headed.
4. Blogging can help make powerful connections
Technical blogging injects you into an online community of fellow professionals who are passionate about the topic they are writing about. If you are contributing valuable information and insight, and link to others, you’ll likely end up on the radar of these people, and ultimately connect with other world class players in your field.
Blogging is certainly cheaper than flying across the world non-stop to meet all these folks at expensive conferences (though blogging is not a substitute for in-person human interaction).
Society functions through people interacting, connecting, and networking. How you use this opportunity is up to you, but it can definitely be a boost for your career, business, or even life in general to be in touch with other experts in the field of your choice.
5. Blogging can help you make friends
Even better than powerful acquaintances are friends. As a prominent blogger you’ll get to meet and interact with a wealth of people online. If you’re social and available to others, you’ll end up making friends (influential and less influential ones alike) online.
I’ve lost count of how many people I’ve come to know thanks to my technical blogs.
Sometimes it’s a case of someone who comments often and you get to know them better through this route. Other times it is a fellow blogger. Often, it’s someone who noticed you through your blog and gets in touch via email. If you are fairly popular in your field, you may even get the occasional ego boosting, “Oh, I follow your blog” when introducing yourself at meetups or trade conferences.
6. Blogging can provide you with a second income
Most bloggers live under the false assumption that you can’t make serious money from running a blog on the side. They understand that if you dedicate yourself full-time, there is money to be made, but they severely underestimate how much revenue you can generate with just a couple of hours of your time per week. They’ve tried or heard horror stories from people making mere pennies with AdSense, and assume that they can’t monetize their own blog unless they’re really famous.
A few hundred dollars a month from your blog is absolutely within the reach of any professional out there. If you do everything right, and put in the work required, your blog can even make you thousands of dollars, both directly and indirectly.
My technical blogs make me a few thousand dollars every month, and I often end up not touching them for weeks at the time. Blogging is not passive income, but if you know what you are doing, all the content you produce compounds and ends up providing you with a substantial income – even when you neglect the blog for a few weeks or months at a time.
Blogging can provide you with some serious extra income that you can then use to finance your hobby, buy gadgets, pay off debt, or do whatever else you desire. It’s a really nice feeling to receive a few extra checks each month, and it will further motivate you to continue blogging.
In my book I cover in great detail how I go about monetizing my blogs, but I’ll also talk more about this subject on this site (subscribe via feed or email if you’d like to be notified of such future articles).
7. Blogging can score you freebies
Publishers and PR firms have become aware of the influence bloggers have on targeted audiences. Even as a mildly successful blogger, you can expect to be contacted by a multitude of people offering you freebies. Depending on your niche and field, these offers will typically be for books, but it’s not uncommon to receive offers for other items, including tickets for conferences, gadgets, software, etc.
As long as you disclose your affiliation (in a way that makes the FTC happy), it’s actually very nice to routinely receive freebies of this kind. If you like what you receive, you can then blog about that product and review it for your readers.
Often, if you establish good relationships with publishers and PR firms, you can even organize giveaway contests which benefit your readers, not just yourself.
8. Blogging can advance your career
A few of the previous benefits I mentioned have already revealed how blogging can have a positive impact in your career. However, I’d like to stress just how much blogging can open certain doors for you. Every post you make is a new opportunity to get people to notice you on a professional level.
Because of my blogs, but primarily my programming one, I’ve received countless job offers over the years, including some from a selection of the largest and most sought after companies in the world. Some offered me generous relocation packages to the US, and a few went so far as to offer me the job, no questions asked (e.g., they didn’t even require a formal interview, they had sized me up enough through my blog writing).
I got my job at IBM in Canada mainly thanks to my blog (at the time I was still in Europe).
Whether blogging allows you to find a new job, customers, partners, investors, publishers who are interested in having you authoring a book, or something else entirely, it is certainly a great career booster.
In fact, my number one piece of advice for new professionals who are interested in building their careers is to start blogging today.
9. Blogging can make you popular in your field
Most professionals work hard because they want to be successful and gain recogniztion in their field. Blogging aides with that and can make small celebrities out of regular professionals. For those in the tech world, this is not an uncommon occurrence. Names like Joel Spolsky, Derek Sivers, Steve Yegge, and Scott Hanselman come to mind.
I’m reminded of Joey Roth’s “Charlatan, Martyr, Hustler” poster. If you do incredible work but nobody knows about it you are a martyr. If you accomplish nothing and do no work, but talk a sweet talk, you are a charlatan. If you can walk the walk, and talk the talk, then you are a hustler.
Blogging helps you ensure that you can talk the talk and reach the right audience, once you have walked the walk.
10. Blogging can help you reach and teach a wide audience
The number one reason to blog for many people, is the desire to share their knowledge and teach others.
For some, even in the technical realm, it’s a matter of politics. For example, an Agile development professional may actually want to influence the community and advocate his theories and ideas about the process of developing software, so that they (potentially) become widespread.
Others, may use this teaching tool to promote their technical projects. An example, also from the software development world, is blogging to help people become aware, loyal, and eventually proficient in an open source tool that you created.

As you can imagine, these are just some of the many benefits of blogging. As you begin creating your own blog posts, you’ll likely find that some of them fall into place organically, whereas you need to work at others. All however, stand to enrich your career and life, and help inspire you to keep blogging for years to come.
saranya
 
Jan 8, 2015

Amature

Is YouTube Worth Your Time as a Marketing Tool?
November 25, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano 2 Comments

Will it blend?A reader wrote to me with a question about whether YouTube was worth it as a marketing tool.
The shortest answer I could give is that today YouTube is as important as having a blog.
Here is why:
YouTube, which is owned by Google, is the most used search engine after Google itself.
When a quality video matches a query that someone searched for on Google, that video will be returned with the rest of the web results… at the top. I don’t have conversion statistics, but I can only assume a sizable percentage of viewers will click on the videos both due to their location in the SERP (Search Engine Result Page) and the nature of the content (watching a video takes less effort than reading an article). In other words, YouTube is an easy SEO shortcut to the top.
Humans are highly visual animals. People are much more likely to watch a video than read an equivalent article.
YouTube goes out of its way to promote your channel and videos if they consider them to be interesting and engaging. This helps you reach a potentially large audience for free.
Playlists let you keep the viewer engaged with your content and message.
Unlike Facebook, which will only allow you to reach a subset of subscribers unless you pay for a broader audience, once you have a YouTube subscriber in place, you can easily reach them every time you post a new video.
Video can tell so much more about your product and the company behind it (even if there isn’t a product that’s being sold per se).
With more people canceling their Cable subscriptions in favor of smart TVs, media boxes like the Apple TV or Chromecast, or even tablets, expect to see far greater numbers of folks tuning in to watch video content on such devices.
Social media is very keen on video, as it works well for people who are in “surfing mode”. Videos also tend to be shared more often than textual content.
YouTube allows people to link to their external sites on their channel page, in video descriptions, and even within video annotations. So you can certainly send people to your YouTube channel via your blog, but you’ll also get a wider audience to learn about your blog through YouTube.
This blog audience can be broadly divided in the following categories, which at times can overlap:
Professionals interested in advancing their career via blogging.
Freelancers interested in finding clients via blogging.
Startup owners interested in promoting their startup via blogging.
Company owners or workers interested in promoting products via blogging.
Non-profit or open source developers, interested in promoting their non-profit projects and initiatives via blogging.
People interested in making extra money online by sharing their knowledge via blogging.
People interested in making a full-time income via blogging.
Replace “via blogging” with “via YouTube” and you’ll quickly see how applicable YouTube is to each one of these types of readers.
I would recommend that the same type of content you use for blogging also shows up in your YouTube channel. A freelancer for example, will need to showcase their expertise and offer solutions to problems that their customers might have. That’s as true on their blog as on YouTube. In fact, if available, calling your YouTube channel the same as your blog is definitely not a bad idea either.
You could then leverage the strengths of each type of media and opt for articles about particular problems and videos for others. A screencast is sometimes easier than trying to explain things in writing, for example.
Interestingly, while I have read and studied extensively this subject, I don’t have a personal YouTube channel for this or any of my other blogs. This, however, is something that I intend to fix soon.
On that note, one of the best courses I have ever come across on this subject is this one on Udemy, which I highly recommend to anyone who wants to give YouTube a go or to take their channel to the next level.

How Often Should You Blog?
December 2, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano Leave a Comment

Calendar iconPeople who are new to blogging often wonder what the best posting pace to maximize the growth of their blog is. The ideal blog posting frequency will depend on several factors, including the type of audience and the subject at hand. Let’s narrow things down however to an acceptable range.
I wouldn’t consider a blog that posts less than once a month to be an active blog. [1] Conversely, a blog that isn’t powered by multiple authors and/or isn’t a professional news outlet or the like, probably shouldn’t post more than a couple of times a day at most. [2]
So we have a wide range here. From once a month to two or three posts per day. Which one is right for you?
My suggestion is to base the answer on a couple of factors.
First, your ability to produce valuable content plays a huge role. It is always, without a doubt, better to post great content less frequently than to post useless stuff for the sake of posting often. Based on the time you can dedicate to blogging and your speed in researching and producing posts, being completely honest with yourself, how many great posts can you comfortably push out each week?
For most people the answers is one or two a week at most. If you have to, it really is better to compromise quantity over quality.
The second factor is consistency. Are you able to deliver your set number of articles per week on a regular basis? [3] If you only write two articles per week on your good weeks, it’s far better to set your publishing schedule to one post per week and leverage good weeks to stock up in advance on scheduled posts. This will also save you from constantly feeling like you need to write everything at the last-minute.
Try to be somewhat consistent in establishing a certain posting frequency expectation among your readers. You want your audience to feel like your posts are a regular part of their week/month that they can look forward to and enjoy on a regular basis.
In the case of this blog, I’ve set an informal pace of one post per week. On my programming blog, I now post twice a week.
If you are already blogging with a certain regularity, how many posts per month or week do you publish?
This can be okay if you have multiple blogs, and some of these are on the back burner intentionally. I have some rarely updated blogs myself. ^
Exceptions do exist of course. Particularly if you are doing nano-publishing, where the content is mostly small quips and links to other resources. ^
If you are a long time follower of this blog or others of mine, you’ll know that I have failed at times to blog with consistency. There have been periods where blogging wasn’t a priority and my online properties weren’t updated as often as they should have as a result. I have recently recommitted to blogging on a regular basis on two of my blogs, Technical Blogging and Zen and the Art of Programming.
saranya
 
Jan 8, 2015

Verdict

In Which I Share Statistics from My Blogs
December 9, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano 2 Comments

One of the most enjoyable aspects of running a blog is, let’s admit it, checking out its statistics. [1] You can gain insight about your readers and figure out where your traffic is coming from. Above all, you can determine what’s working and what’s not in terms of content and marketing strategies.
Just for fun, today I’m going to share with you the top ten articles from various blogs I run, ordered by number of views. I’m also going to show you the main channels through which each of these sites gets traffic.
I’m going to share an “all time” temporal window, so that you can see what content and traffic sources worked for me in the long run. [2] Of course, newer posts are penalized by this approach.
Technical Blogging
Hey, why not start with this blog? These are the top ten articles here to date:
Technical Blogging's Top 10
Technical Blogging’s Top 10.
The relatively few articles and long hiatus for the past year or so are clearly reflected in these statistics. Three articles absolutely dominate traffic wise. Not incidentally, they are genuinely useful articles, arguably much more so than the rest. I mention this to restate once again that providing something that’s genuinely useful to your reader is almost always rewarded.
So let’s take a look at how you got here:
Technical Blogging's Sources.
Technical Blogging’s Sources.
Occasionally the content of this blog is suitable for submission on Hacker News and Reddit, but the lion’s share belongs to Google search. To me this stresses the point that content, both quality and quantity, are still extremely important. The more content you have, the more Google can send readers your way. The higher quality, the more people will stick around, link to your posts, [3] share them, etc.
Zen and the Art of Programming

Alright, let’s get more serious. Let’s take a look at the top ten for Zen and the Art of Programming, my programming/technology musings blog.
Zen and the Art of Programming's Top 10.
Zen and the Art of Programming’s Top 10.
We’re doing a little better traffic wise. Here are a few lessons and comments I feel are worth making about these numbers:
The top post is a statistical outlier, due to a complaint I made that went viral back in the good old days of Digg.
Shootouts were a series of benchmarks I used to run that were quite popular in the Ruby community. Some considered them useless or misleadings, but most found them interesting or even useful.
Opinionated articles drive crowds. Take a stance when you blog.
When you have a large amount of posts (325+ in this case), the corpus of articles is far more important than the occasional outlier that does really well. Unlike Technical Blogging’s stats, you can see that the top performers only accounted for a couple percentage points of the total site’s readership.
Let’s see where readers came from:
Zen and the Art of Programming's Sources.
Zen and the Art of Programming’s Sources.
Google is again king of the referrers, bringing in more than a third of traffic. Due to the subject matter, Reddit and Hacker News also did pretty well.
Math Blog

Math Blog is my brilliant, yet sadly far too often neglected child. It’s a blog with a world of potential but for one reason or another, I never end up dedicating the time it so deserves. Despite my relative lack of attention to it, Math Blog does extremely well traffic wise. Here are its top ten articles:
Math Blog's Top 10.
Math Blog’s Top 10.
A couple of points about these numbers. With only 125+ articles, the blog is at a stage where a few top performers can still bring in the majority of traffic. If you add them up, the top ten articles bring in over 50% of all the site’s traffic. It’s also worth noting that list based posts do really well, as expected.
You won’t be surprised by now, but yeah, Google is the top source of traffic for Math Blog as well:
Math Blog's Sources.
Math Blog’s Sources.
This blog has received the odd spike of traffic from social media or popular blogs linking to it, however in the long run, once everyone has forgotten about your fleeting minute of fame, Google still remember that you’re there. To me this is an important reminder of playing nice with Google and not trying to trick the system by adopting black hat techniques. Doing so is simply not worth it.
Chronically Vintage

Okay, this is my wife’s blog, not my own, but I thought it would be interesting to see how a completely different demographic (95%+ female), that is generally speaking far less technical, would fare.
Here is her site’s list, which is not necessarily her own top ten in the sense of the posts that she personally feels demonstrates her best writing or the topics that she believes have been the most helpful to her readers. This is often the case when blogging, however there is a correlation in general between your best effort and your most popular content.
Chronically Vintage's Top 10.
Chronically Vintage’s Top 10.
Here again, lists are popular. What’s interesting about her blog is the limited variance among her top 100 articles, not just top 10. The fact is, her blog is fairly niche and there isn’t a huge community out there for it. So she works it piece by piece, by producing what has now amounted to multiple books worth of interesting, diverse content.
Having recently hit 1,200 posts and counting, her blog is definitely a member of the long tail party. It doesn’t overly matter how well a particular article does traffic wise. It’s the whole aggregate of content that gets her a wide viewership and scores of devoted readers. Can you guess what her traffic referral looks like?
Chronically Vintage's Sources.
Chronically Vintage’s Sources.
As expected, an even greater contribution by Google (and search engines in general).
There you have it – these are my numbers. I hope you enjoyed a little glimpse into the stats for a few of my, our I should say, our, main blogs and that they’ve inspired you to take a gander at your own to see what valuable information you can glean from them. [4]
Like all things, checking statistics can become addictive and a potential productivity killer. Don’t overdo it. Once a day, or even once a week, is plenty. ↩
These are ballpark, conservative estimates. Many of these entries do not include visits from alternative URLs which can easily amount to a few thousand more visits. ↩
Of course, people linking to your article will aid your search engine rankings, which in turn will bring more traffic. ↩
Those who bought my book will see how some of the numbers I shared within it have changed over time.
Tresa John J
 
Jan 8, 2015

Good

I often argue that professionals should share their knowledge online via blogging.
The catch is that virtually anything worthwhile in life takes time and effort, and blogging is not an exception to this statement. So before committing your energy to such an endeavor, you may rightfully stop and wonder what’s in it for you. Is blogging really worth it?
In this article, I briefly illustrate some of the main benefits that directly derive from running a technical blog.
1. Blogging can improve your communication skills
Communication and writing, much like programming, are skills honed through countless hours of practice. As you work hard at articulating your thoughts into words, you’ll find that the process ends up improving your ability to express yourself. And communication is key, almost regardless of your profession.
Over time, you’ll become a faster and better technical writer, who’s able to come up with an insightful essay or tutorial in just an hour or two.
Even better, you’ll be able to concisely formulate confusing or undefined thoughts into exact words. Vague thoughts that you considered in your head will either prove to be valid and gain strength throughout the process of formalizing them into words, or quickly fall apart as flawed ideas once you see them on the screen.
This habit will make you not only a better communicator, but also a better, clearer thinker.
2. Blogging can improve your technical skills
One of the most successful learning technique I know is to try to teach what you’re currently learning yourself to other people.
The process of explaining something to others quickly solidifies your knowledge and outlines its shortcomings, exposing your own doubts about the material you’re studying. This is why writing down and paraphrasing a book, something bright student often do, is a powerful technique that helps retain and clarify your understanding of the information you’re gathering.
As a blogger, you are likely to improve your technical skills because you are forced to research further topics in order to properly share them with the public. You might be corrected by commenters who know more about the subject than you do, and learn a lot from them in the process. As well you may learn more as others expand on what you had to say within their blogs, or perhaps force you to answer more questions about the topic than you thought about in the first place.
As I mentioned in my book, blogging is just as much as teaching as it is about starting a conversation. These conversations will often help increase your expertise and well-roundedness.
The collaborative power of blogging was truly highlighted and pushed to the limit by the Fields medalist Professor Timothy Gowers with his Polymath Project, in which his blog and commenting section was used to figure out unsolved mathematical problems collaboratively.
3. Blogging can provide you with a repository for your knowledge
Some people like to use personal wikis for this purpose, but blogging can be an excellent way to keep track of information you intend to retrieve at a later stage. For example many programmers use their own old posts to find particular snippets of code, the exact steps to configure a server, or a given URL for a useful service they blogged about.
At times you’ll find that googling for a given problem will bring up an article from your own blog that you may very well have forgotten about. (And if that post doesn’t solve your problem, you can curse your past self for not providing more details back when you wrote it.)
Looking back at your old posts is also a great way to keep track of progress, and have access to a timeline of what you were dealing with, thinking, and doing at a given moment in the past. It’s fun to look back once in a while and introspect about how far you’ve come. This can often provide you with glimpses of insight about where your career and professional interests are headed.
4. Blogging can help make powerful connections
Technical blogging injects you into an online community of fellow professionals who are passionate about the topic they are writing about. If you are contributing valuable information and insight, and link to others, you’ll likely end up on the radar of these people, and ultimately connect with other world class players in your field.
Blogging is certainly cheaper than flying across the world non-stop to meet all these folks at expensive conferences (though blogging is not a substitute for in-person human interaction).
Society functions through people interacting, connecting, and networking. How you use this opportunity is up to you, but it can definitely be a boost for your career, business, or even life in general to be in touch with other experts in the field of your choice.
5. Blogging can help you make friends
Even better than powerful acquaintances are friends. As a prominent blogger you’ll get to meet and interact with a wealth of people online. If you’re social and available to others, you’ll end up making friends (influential and less influential ones alike) online.
I’ve lost count of how many people I’ve come to know thanks to my technical blogs.
Sometimes it’s a case of someone who comments often and you get to know them better through this route. Other times it is a fellow blogger. Often, it’s someone who noticed you through your blog and gets in touch via email. If you are fairly popular in your field, you may even get the occasional ego boosting, “Oh, I follow your blog” when introducing yourself at meetups or trade conferences.
6. Blogging can provide you with a second income
Most bloggers live under the false assumption that you can’t make serious money from running a blog on the side. They understand that if you dedicate yourself full-time, there is money to be made, but they severely underestimate how much revenue you can generate with just a couple of hours of your time per week. They’ve tried or heard horror stories from people making mere pennies with AdSense, and assume that they can’t monetize their own blog unless they’re really famous.
A few hundred dollars a month from your blog is absolutely within the reach of any professional out there. If you do everything right, and put in the work required, your blog can even make you thousands of dollars, both directly and indirectly.
My technical blogs make me a few thousand dollars every month, and I often end up not touching them for weeks at the time. Blogging is not passive income, but if you know what you are doing, all the content you produce compounds and ends up providing you with a substantial income – even when you neglect the blog for a few weeks or months at a time.
Blogging can provide you with some serious extra income that you can then use to finance your hobby, buy gadgets, pay off debt, or do whatever else you desire. It’s a really nice feeling to receive a few extra checks each month, and it will further motivate you to continue blogging.
In my book I cover in great detail how I go about monetizing my blogs, but I’ll also talk more about this subject on this site (subscribe via feed or email if you’d like to be notified of such future articles).
7. Blogging can score you freebies
Publishers and PR firms have become aware of the influence bloggers have on targeted audiences. Even as a mildly successful blogger, you can expect to be contacted by a multitude of people offering you freebies. Depending on your niche and field, these offers will typically be for books, but it’s not uncommon to receive offers for other items, including tickets for conferences, gadgets, software, etc.
As long as you disclose your affiliation (in a way that makes the FTC happy), it’s actually very nice to routinely receive freebies of this kind. If you like what you receive, you can then blog about that product and review it for your readers.
Often, if you establish good relationships with publishers and PR firms, you can even organize giveaway contests which benefit your readers, not just yourself.
8. Blogging can advance your career
A few of the previous benefits I mentioned have already revealed how blogging can have a positive impact in your career. However, I’d like to stress just how much blogging can open certain doors for you. Every post you make is a new opportunity to get people to notice you on a professional level.
Because of my blogs, but primarily my programming one, I’ve received countless job offers over the years, including some from a selection of the largest and most sought after companies in the world. Some offered me generous relocation packages to the US, and a few went so far as to offer me the job, no questions asked (e.g., they didn’t even require a formal interview, they had sized me up enough through my blog writing).
I got my job at IBM in Canada mainly thanks to my blog (at the time I was still in Europe).
Whether blogging allows you to find a new job, customers, partners, investors, publishers who are interested in having you authoring a book, or something else entirely, it is certainly a great career booster.
In fact, my number one piece of advice for new professionals who are interested in building their careers is to start blogging today.
9. Blogging can make you popular in your field
Most professionals work hard because they want to be successful and gain recogniztion in their field. Blogging aides with that and can make small celebrities out of regular professionals. For those in the tech world, this is not an uncommon occurrence. Names like Joel Spolsky, Derek Sivers, Steve Yegge, and Scott Hanselman come to mind.
I’m reminded of Joey Roth’s “Charlatan, Martyr, Hustler” poster. If you do incredible work but nobody knows about it you are a martyr. If you accomplish nothing and do no work, but talk a sweet talk, you are a charlatan. If you can walk the walk, and talk the talk, then you are a hustler.
Blogging helps you ensure that you can talk the talk and reach the right audience, once you have walked the walk.
10. Blogging can help you reach and teach a wide audience
The number one reason to blog for many people, is the desire to share their knowledge and teach others.
For some, even in the technical realm, it’s a matter of politics. For example, an Agile development professional may actually want to influence the community and advocate his theories and ideas about the process of developing software, so that they (potentially) become widespread.
Others, may use this teaching tool to promote their technical projects. An example, also from the software development world, is blogging to help people become aware, loyal, and eventually proficient in an open source tool that you created.

As you can imagine, these are just some of the many benefits of blogging. As you begin creating your own blog posts, you’ll likely find that some of them fall into place organically, whereas you need to work at others. All however, stand to enrich your career and life, and help inspire you to keep blogging for years to come.
Tresa John J
 
Jan 8, 2015

Good

As many of my friends, colleagues, and followers know, I’ve been working on the book Technical Blogging: Turn Your Expertise into a Remarkable Online Presence for the past few months.
I wrapped up writing a couple of weeks ago and the book is now headed into production phase, where any additional intervention on my part will be limited and the heavy lifting will be left to the fine folks at The Pragmatic Bookshelf.
Over two hundred and fifty pages is a lot of writing on any subject, no matter how much you love it, and I’m currently enjoy a bit of rest from this recent large scale project. This small break from writing has given me the opportunity to think about what I’d like to do next.
Despite being a very passionate programmer, a few years ago I caught the internet marketing bug. I’m thankful I did, as it has brought me plenty of satisfaction and many economical rewards as a web entrepreneur.
This is to say that I’m the rare breed of programmer who doesn’t despise or belittle marketing. Quite the opposite actually; I love it.
As such I realized that I’m not quite done talking about blogging and internet marketing; I’ve only began to delve into it. Therefore I’m launching this new blog, aptly named after my book, for the following three reasons:
I want to share my knowledge about technical blogging with an as large audience as possible. While the book is admittedly selling extremely well even before it’s gone to print (it’s in beta as of December 2011), I’d like to reach an even larger group of people. Blogging is the best way I know of to achieve this goal.
I’m a fan of eating my own dog food. Within the book I outlined a great plan to transform virtually anyone into a successful blogger. I have done it before, but I intend to follow my own plan and advice to the letter with this blog and showcase how things turn out.
I’m a business man. There is plenty of money to be made by sharing your knowledge online through a blog. As I help other people do what I’m already doing with my technical blogs, I’ll also get to increase my influence and income through this blog as well.
The third point is self-serving, but there is nothing wrong with that. When you work hard at something, it’s totally fine for those who find value in what you do to end up rewarding you economically for all your diligent effort.
That’s the very spirit of entrepreneurship and much of what makes modern society a comfortable place to live.
Periodically I’ll detail the progress of this blog, in terms of statistics and perhaps earnings as well (as I touched on in the book regarding some of the other blogs I own).
For the time being, I encourage you to subscribe to this site via email or RSS feed, for free, insightful, no-fluff tips on how to become a successful blogger.
If you are not convinced, check out the about section where I outline my mission, what’s in store for you here, and who my target readers are.
Happy blogging!
Don’t Count on Ads
December 17, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano Leave a Comment

ABPDr. Dobbs is an iconic publication for programmers. Yesterday they announced that they’d be shutting down after 38 years of operation. Despite its growing audience, the site has failed to monetize those eyeballs to a degree that satisfies their parent company.
Sadness aside, what’s remarkable here is that their number of page views grew while revenue went down. That means that their RPM (Revenue Per Mille, so per thousand impressions) has gone down.
In fact, here is the motivation behind their decision:
Why would a well-known site, dearly loved by its readers and coming off a year of record page views, be sunset by its owner?
In one word, revenue. Four years ago, when I came to Dr. Dobb’s, we had healthy profits and revenue, almost all of it from advertising. Despite our excellent growth on the editorial side, our revenue declined such that today it’s barely 30% of what it was when I started. […] This is because in the last 18 months, there has been a marked shift in how vendors value website advertising. They’ve come to realize that website ads tend to be less effective than they once were. Given that I’ve never bought a single item by clicking on an ad on a website, this conclusion seems correct in the small.
What does this mean for much smaller online publications like bloggers? Ads have historically been the easiest way for bloggers to earn some income from their blogs. You’d embed some code obtained from a network like Google Adsense, and collect royalties at the end of the month. [1]
Google doesn’t allow disclosure of specific numbers about their program’s RPM so that’s not a conversation we can have. Nevertheless, if you Google it (boy have we come to depend on them) you’ll find that it’s not uncommon for blogs to sit somewhere between $1–4 per impression, depending on subject matter, ad position, ad network, etc. [2]
In general you’re allowed up to three ad placements on a page, so you could in theory have an RPM per page between $3 and $12. That means that a blog achieving 100,000 page views per month could be earning between $300-$1,200 solely from a single ad network.
Now, 100,000 page views per month are far from easy, but entirely possible after a while. And $300-$1,200 is a nice amount of extra pocket change for the occasional or even dedicated blogger. That’s not however the case if blogging is your day job or if you are a larger company with staff and writers to support.
Ads are not dead as far as bloggers are concerned, but those interested in maximizing their revenue must realize that advertising on the web has its limits. They are part of a healthy meal, but not the whole meal.
The reason for that was explained by the Dr. Dobb’s quote above. Advertisers have found web ads to not be as lucrative as other options. Ask anyone who’s tried their hand at Google Adwords and they will all tell you how easy it is to lose your shirt if you are not extremely careful, and how hard it is to make a profit.
People have learned to ignore ads. Banner blindness is as real as it ever was. For technical audiences, AdBlock plugins are also something to contend with. [3] The truth is that what’s good for advertisers is good for publishers, and ads have not been serving advertisers too well. [4]
Your blog revenue strategy shouldn’t count on ads alone. Sponsorship, directly negotiated with the right companies, are already more rewarding. However, I contend that affiliate marketing, done through genuine reviews, recommendations, and mentions is far superior both in terms of revenue and service offered to advertisers. Furthermore, if the recommendations are authentic and not done just for a quick buck, they serve your audience as well. It’s a win-win-win situation all around.
You’ll also want to consider being your own advertiser. Selling your own products and services through your blog can be extremely lucrative and doesn’t generally come across as disgraceful to your audience in the way that excessive advertisement can.
Finally, remember that a lot of value can be extracted from your blog in ways that are not directly translated into a dollar figure. As I stress in my book, blogging can open the door to new job opportunities, partnerships, the ability to promote your own projects or startup, increase your authority within your field, and many other indirect benefits.
That is if Google didn’t randomly decide to accuse you of some form of fraudulent clicking and lock your account without paying you what you’ve already earned. ↩
People who create sites and blogs specifically made for Adsense, will often have much higher RPM because they target the most rewarding keywords and niches on purpose. For example, they may launch sites about insurance and law firms. ↩
While AdBlock cannot be blamed for Dr. Dobb’s demise, it surely didn’t help that the audience of programmers, as a whole, has a large percentage of AdBlock users. ↩
To fight against banner blindness, unscrupulous advertisers and publishers have created increasingly obnoxious or misleading ads, such as the common “One trick to a…” campaigns with hand drawn graphics. They are hand drawn because it makes them look less like ads (this won’t last forever). Likewise, some site’s templates have begun embedding ads that look like related articles at the bottom of the page, thus tricking you into believing that an ad is genuine content.
Tresa John J
 
Jan 8, 2015

Good

THIS IS THE LIFE

By Annie Dillard from the Fall issue of Image: A Journal of the Arts and Religion, published by the Center for Religious Humanism at Seattle Pacific University. Dillard's most recent book is For the Time Being.

Any culture tells you how to live your one and only life: to wit as everyone else does. Probably most cultures prize, as ours rightly does, making a contribution by working hard at work that you love; being in the know, and intelligent; gathering a surplus; and loving your family above all, and your dog, your boat, bird-watching. Beyond those things our culture might specialize in money, and celebrity, and natural beauty. These are not universal. You enjoy work and will love your grandchildren, and somewhere in there you die.

Another contemporary consensus might be: You wear the best shoes you can afford, you seek to know Rome's best restaurants and their staffs, drive the best car, and vacation on Tenerife. And what a cook you are!

Or you take the next tribe's pigs in thrilling raids; you grill yams; you trade for televisions and hunt white-plumed birds. Everyone you know agrees: this is the life. Perhaps you burn captives. You set fire to a drunk. Yours is the human struggle, or the elite one, to achieve... whatever your own culture tells you: to publish the paper that proves the point; to progress in the firm and gain high title and salary, stock options, benefits; to get the loan to store the beans till their price rises; to elude capture, to feed your children or educate them to a feather edge; or to count coup or perfect your calligraphy; to eat the king's deer or catch the poacher; to spear the seal, intimidate the enemy, and be a big man or beloved woman and die respected for the pigs or the title or the shoes. Not a funeral. Forget funeral. A big birthday party. Since everyone around you agrees.

Since everyone around you agrees ever since there were people on earth that land is value, or labor is value, or learning is value, or

title, necklaces, degree, murex shells, or ownership of slaves. Everyone knows bees sting and ghosts haunt and giving your robes away humiliates your rivals. That the enemies are barbarians. That wise men swim through the rock of the earth; that houses breed filth, airstrips attract airplanes, tornadoes punish, ancestors watch, and you can buy a shorter stay in purgatory. The black rock is holy, or the scroll; or the pangolin is holy, the quetzal is holy, this tree, water, rock, stone, cow, cross, or mountain and it's all true. The Red Sox. Or nothing at all is holy, as everyone intelligent knows.

Who is your "everyone"? Chess masters scarcely surround themselves with motocross racers. Do you want aborigines at your birthday party? Or are you serving yak-butter tea? Popular culture deals not in its distant past, or any other past, or any other culture. You know no one who longs to buy a mule or be named to court or thrown into a volcano.

So the illusion, like the visual field, is complete It has no holes except books you read and soon forget. And death takes us by storm. What was that, that life? What else offered? If for him it was contract bridge, if for her it was copyright law, if for everyone it was and is an optimal mix of family and friends, learning, contribution, and joy of making and amelioratingwhat else is there, or was there, or will there ever be?

What else is a vision or fact of time and the peoples it bears issuing from the mouth of the cosmos, from the round mouth of eternity, in a wide and parti-colored utterance. In the complex weave of this utterance like fabric, in its infinite domestic interstices, the centuries and continents and classes dwell. Each people knows only its own squares in the weave, its wars and instruments and arts, and also the starry sky.

Okay, and then what? Say you scale your own weft and see time's breadth and the length of space. You see the way the fabric both passes among the stars and encloses them. You see in the weave nearby, and aslant farther off, the peoples variously scandalized or exalted in their squares. They work on their projects they flake



spear points, hoe, plant; they kill aurochs or one another; they prepare sacrifices as we here and now work on our projects. What, seeing this spread multiply infinitely in every direction, would you do differently? No one could love your children more; would you love them less? Would you change your project? To what? Whatever you do, it has likely brought delight to fewer people than either contract bridge or the Red Sox.

However hypnotized you and your people are, you will be just as dead in their war, our war. However dead you are, more people will come. However many more people come, your time and its passions, and yourself and your passions, weigh equally in the balance with those of any dead who pulled waterwheel poles by the Nile or Yellow rivers, or painted their foreheads black, or starved in the wilderness, or wasted from disease then or now. Our lives and our deaths count equally, or we must abandon one-man-one-vote dismantle democracy, and assign six billion people an importance-of-life ranking from one to six billiona ranking whose number decreases, like gravity, with the square of the distance between us and them.

What would you do differently, you up on your beanstalk looking at scenes of all peoples at all times in all places? When you climb down, would you dance any less to the music you love, knowing that music to be as provisional as a bug? Somebody has to make jugs and shoes, to turn the soil, fish. If you descend the long rope-ladders back to your people and time in the fabric, if you tell them what you have seen, and even if someone cares to listen, then what? Everyone knows times and cultures are plural. If you come back a shrugging relativist or tongue-tied absolutist, then what? If you spend hours a day looking around, high astraddle the warp or woof of your people's wall, then what new wisdom can you take to your grave for worms to untangle? Well, maybe you will not go into advertising.

Then you would know your own death better but perhaps not dread it less. Try to bring people up the wall, carry children to see it to

what end? Fewer golf courses? What is wrong with golf? Nothing at all. Equality of wealth? Sure; how?

The woman watching sheep over there, the man who carries embers in a pierced clay ball, the engineer, the girl who spins wool into yarn as she climbs, the smelter, the babies learning to recognize speech in their own languages, the man whipping a slave's flayed back, the man digging roots, the woman digging roots, the child digging roots what would you tell them? And the future people what are they doing? What excitements sweep peoples here and there from time to time? Into the muddy river they go, into the trenches, into the caves, into the mines, into the granary, into the sea in boats. Most humans who were ever alive lived inside one single culture that never changed for hundreds of thousands of years; archaeologists scratch their heads at so conservative and static a culture.

Over here, the rains fail; they are starving. There, the caribou fail; they are starving. Corrupt leaders take the wealth. Not only there but here. Rust and smut spoil the rye. When pigs and cattle starve or freeze, people die soon after. Disease empties a sector, a billion sectors.

People look at the sky and at the other animals. They make beautiful objects, beautiful sounds, beautiful motions of their bodies beating drums in lines. They pray; they toss people in peat bogs; they help the sick and injured; they pierce their lips, their noses, ears; they make the same mistakes despite religion, written language, philosophy, and science; they build, they kill, they preserve, they count and figure, they boil the pot, they keep the embers alive; they tell their stories and gird themselves.

Will knowledge you experience directly make you a Buddhist? Must you forfeit excitement per se? To what end?

Say you have seen something. You have seen an ordinary bit of what is real, the infinite fabric of time that eternity shoots through, and time's soft-skinned people working and dying under slowly shifting stars. Then what?
Raj
 
Dec 29, 2014

BEWARE!!! FRAUD COMPANY BLUEWHALE doing FAKE CAMPUS RECRUITMENT

Dear all,

Blue whale solutions is a fake company who invites the candidates as a software company and demands money. Now they are involving in another fraud. Our college got a mail from this company from the person as Mahesh Kumar, HR-Manager (8695272033) (email: maheshkumar@bluewhalesolutions.com) requesting for a campus drive. They will be asking to book flight ticket as if they are son of Bill Gates and showcasing that their company is like Google. DONT BELIEVE IN BLUE WHALE SOLUTIONS IT IS FAKE. http://www.bluewhalesolutions.com/

They will recruit candidates for the software development position. Once after recruiting the students they will take them to their office in Chennai and tell them that your technical is weak you need to train and demand money from them.

In reality it is only a engineering project doing company for students, a training institute. They are not even worth for that. This companies original name what OpenWire Solutions. They have already done so many fraud in this name. Thats why they have changed it to BlueWhale Solutions.

ALL STUDENTS AND PLACEMENT OFFICERS PLEASE BEWARE OF THIS FAKE COMPANY BLUEWHALE SOLUTIONS
Prema
 
Dec 23, 2014

Neutral

A New Blog, a New Adventure
December 14, 2011 By Antonio Cangiano 9 Comments

14
As many of my friends, colleagues, and followers know, I’ve been working on the book Technical Blogging: Turn Your Expertise into a Remarkable Online Presence for the past few months.
I wrapped up writing a couple of weeks ago and the book is now headed into production phase, where any additional intervention on my part will be limited and the heavy lifting will be left to the fine folks at The Pragmatic Bookshelf.
Over two hundred and fifty pages is a lot of writing on any subject, no matter how much you love it, and I’m currently enjoy a bit of rest from this recent large scale project. This small break from writing has given me the opportunity to think about what I’d like to do next.
Despite being a very passionate programmer, a few years ago I caught the internet marketing bug. I’m thankful I did, as it has brought me plenty of satisfaction and many economical rewards as a web entrepreneur.
This is to say that I’m the rare breed of programmer who doesn’t despise or belittle marketing. Quite the opposite actually; I love it.
As such I realized that I’m not quite done talking about blogging and internet marketing; I’ve only began to delve into it. Therefore I’m launching this new blog, aptly named after my book, for the following three reasons:
I want to share my knowledge about technical blogging with an as large audience as possible. While the book is admittedly selling extremely well even before it’s gone to print (it’s in beta as of December 2011), I’d like to reach an even larger group of people. Blogging is the best way I know of to achieve this goal.
I’m a fan of eating my own dog food. Within the book I outlined a great plan to transform virtually anyone into a successful blogger. I have done it before, but I intend to follow my own plan and advice to the letter with this blog and showcase how things turn out.
I’m a business man. There is plenty of money to be made by sharing your knowledge online through a blog. As I help other people do what I’m already doing with my technical blogs, I’ll also get to increase my influence and income through this blog as well.
The third point is self-serving, but there is nothing wrong with that. When you work hard at something, it’s totally fine for those who find value in what you do to end up rewarding you economically for all your diligent effort.
That’s the very spirit of entrepreneurship and much of what makes modern society a comfortable place to live.
Periodically I’ll detail the progress of this blog, in terms of statistics and perhaps earnings as well (as I touched on in the book regarding some of the other blogs I own).
For the time being, I encourage you to subscribe to this site via email or RSS feed, for free, insightful, no-fluff tips on how to become a successful blogger.
If you are not convinced, check out the about section where I outline my mission, what’s in store for you here, and who my target readers are.
Happy blogging!
Don’t Count on Ads
December 17, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano Leave a Comment

ABPDr. Dobbs is an iconic publication for programmers. Yesterday they announced that they’d be shutting down after 38 years of operation. Despite its growing audience, the site has failed to monetize those eyeballs to a degree that satisfies their parent company.
Sadness aside, what’s remarkable here is that their number of page views grew while revenue went down. That means that their RPM (Revenue Per Mille, so per thousand impressions) has gone down.
In fact, here is the motivation behind their decision:
Why would a well-known site, dearly loved by its readers and coming off a year of record page views, be sunset by its owner?
In one word, revenue. Four years ago, when I came to Dr. Dobb’s, we had healthy profits and revenue, almost all of it from advertising. Despite our excellent growth on the editorial side, our revenue declined such that today it’s barely 30% of what it was when I started. […] This is because in the last 18 months, there has been a marked shift in how vendors value website advertising. They’ve come to realize that website ads tend to be less effective than they once were. Given that I’ve never bought a single item by clicking on an ad on a website, this conclusion seems correct in the small.
What does this mean for much smaller online publications like bloggers? Ads have historically been the easiest way for bloggers to earn some income from their blogs. You’d embed some code obtained from a network like Google Adsense, and collect royalties at the end of the month. [1]
Google doesn’t allow disclosure of specific numbers about their program’s RPM so that’s not a conversation we can have. Nevertheless, if you Google it (boy have we come to depend on them) you’ll find that it’s not uncommon for blogs to sit somewhere between $1–4 per impression, depending on subject matter, ad position, ad network, etc. [2]
In general you’re allowed up to three ad placements on a page, so you could in theory have an RPM per page between $3 and $12. That means that a blog achieving 100,000 page views per month could be earning between $300-$1,200 solely from a single ad network.
Now, 100,000 page views per month are far from easy, but entirely possible after a while. And $300-$1,200 is a nice amount of extra pocket change for the occasional or even dedicated blogger. That’s not however the case if blogging is your day job or if you are a larger company with staff and writers to support.
Ads are not dead as far as bloggers are concerned, but those interested in maximizing their revenue must realize that advertising on the web has its limits. They are part of a healthy meal, but not the whole meal.
The reason for that was explained by the Dr. Dobb’s quote above. Advertisers have found web ads to not be as lucrative as other options. Ask anyone who’s tried their hand at Google Adwords and they will all tell you how easy it is to lose your shirt if you are not extremely careful, and how hard it is to make a profit.
People have learned to ignore ads. Banner blindness is as real as it ever was. For technical audiences, AdBlock plugins are also something to contend with. [3] The truth is that what’s good for advertisers is good for publishers, and ads have not been serving advertisers too well. [4]
Your blog revenue strategy shouldn’t count on ads alone. Sponsorship, directly negotiated with the right companies, are already more rewarding. However, I contend that affiliate marketing, done through genuine reviews, recommendations, and mentions is far superior both in terms of revenue and service offered to advertisers. Furthermore, if the recommendations are authentic and not done just for a quick buck, they serve your audience as well. It’s a win-win-win situation all around.
You’ll also want to consider being your own advertiser. Selling your own products and services through your blog can be extremely lucrative and doesn’t generally come across as disgraceful to your audience in the way that excessive advertisement can.
Finally, remember that a lot of value can be extracted from your blog in ways that are not directly translated into a dollar figure. As I stress in my book, blogging can open the door to new job opportunities, partnerships, the ability to promote your own projects or startup, increase your authority within your field, and many other indirect benefits.
That is if Google didn’t randomly decide to accuse you of some form of fraudulent clicking and lock your account without paying you what you’ve already earned. ↩
People who create sites and blogs specifically made for Adsense, will often have much higher RPM because they target the most rewarding keywords and niches on purpose. For example, they may launch sites about insurance and law firms. ↩
While AdBlock cannot be blamed for Dr. Dobb’s demise, it surely didn’t help that the audience of programmers, as a whole, has a large percentage of AdBlock users. ↩
To fight against banner blindness, unscrupulous advertisers and publishers have created increasingly obnoxious or misleading ads, such as the common “One trick to a…” campaigns with hand drawn graphics. They are hand drawn because it makes them look less like ads (this won’t last forever). Likewise, some site’s templates have begun embedding ads that look like related articles at the bottom of the page, thus tricking you into believing that an ad is genuine content.
Prema
 
Dec 23, 2014

Very Good

Why Every Professional Should Consider Blogging
January 28, 2012 By Antonio Cangiano 43 Comments

209
I often argue that professionals should share their knowledge online via blogging.
The catch is that virtually anything worthwhile in life takes time and effort, and blogging is not an exception to this statement. So before committing your energy to such an endeavor, you may rightfully stop and wonder what’s in it for you. Is blogging really worth it?
In this article, I briefly illustrate some of the main benefits that directly derive from running a technical blog.
1. Blogging can improve your communication skills
Communication and writing, much like programming, are skills honed through countless hours of practice. As you work hard at articulating your thoughts into words, you’ll find that the process ends up improving your ability to express yourself. And communication is key, almost regardless of your profession.
Over time, you’ll become a faster and better technical writer, who’s able to come up with an insightful essay or tutorial in just an hour or two.
Even better, you’ll be able to concisely formulate confusing or undefined thoughts into exact words. Vague thoughts that you considered in your head will either prove to be valid and gain strength throughout the process of formalizing them into words, or quickly fall apart as flawed ideas once you see them on the screen.
This habit will make you not only a better communicator, but also a better, clearer thinker.
2. Blogging can improve your technical skills
One of the most successful learning technique I know is to try to teach what you’re currently learning yourself to other people.
The process of explaining something to others quickly solidifies your knowledge and outlines its shortcomings, exposing your own doubts about the material you’re studying. This is why writing down and paraphrasing a book, something bright student often do, is a powerful technique that helps retain and clarify your understanding of the information you’re gathering.
As a blogger, you are likely to improve your technical skills because you are forced to research further topics in order to properly share them with the public. You might be corrected by commenters who know more about the subject than you do, and learn a lot from them in the process. As well you may learn more as others expand on what you had to say within their blogs, or perhaps force you to answer more questions about the topic than you thought about in the first place.
As I mentioned in my book, blogging is just as much as teaching as it is about starting a conversation. These conversations will often help increase your expertise and well-roundedness.
The collaborative power of blogging was truly highlighted and pushed to the limit by the Fields medalist Professor Timothy Gowers with his Polymath Project, in which his blog and commenting section was used to figure out unsolved mathematical problems collaboratively.
3. Blogging can provide you with a repository for your knowledge
Some people like to use personal wikis for this purpose, but blogging can be an excellent way to keep track of information you intend to retrieve at a later stage. For example many programmers use their own old posts to find particular snippets of code, the exact steps to configure a server, or a given URL for a useful service they blogged about.
At times you’ll find that googling for a given problem will bring up an article from your own blog that you may very well have forgotten about. (And if that post doesn’t solve your problem, you can curse your past self for not providing more details back when you wrote it.)
Looking back at your old posts is also a great way to keep track of progress, and have access to a timeline of what you were dealing with, thinking, and doing at a given moment in the past. It’s fun to look back once in a while and introspect about how far you’ve come. This can often provide you with glimpses of insight about where your career and professional interests are headed.
4. Blogging can help make powerful connections
Technical blogging injects you into an online community of fellow professionals who are passionate about the topic they are writing about. If you are contributing valuable information and insight, and link to others, you’ll likely end up on the radar of these people, and ultimately connect with other world class players in your field.
Blogging is certainly cheaper than flying across the world non-stop to meet all these folks at expensive conferences (though blogging is not a substitute for in-person human interaction).
Society functions through people interacting, connecting, and networking. How you use this opportunity is up to you, but it can definitely be a boost for your career, business, or even life in general to be in touch with other experts in the field of your choice.
5. Blogging can help you make friends
Even better than powerful acquaintances are friends. As a prominent blogger you’ll get to meet and interact with a wealth of people online. If you’re social and available to others, you’ll end up making friends (influential and less influential ones alike) online.
I’ve lost count of how many people I’ve come to know thanks to my technical blogs.
Sometimes it’s a case of someone who comments often and you get to know them better through this route. Other times it is a fellow blogger. Often, it’s someone who noticed you through your blog and gets in touch via email. If you are fairly popular in your field, you may even get the occasional ego boosting, “Oh, I follow your blog” when introducing yourself at meetups or trade conferences.
6. Blogging can provide you with a second income
Most bloggers live under the false assumption that you can’t make serious money from running a blog on the side. They understand that if you dedicate yourself full-time, there is money to be made, but they severely underestimate how much revenue you can generate with just a couple of hours of your time per week. They’ve tried or heard horror stories from people making mere pennies with AdSense, and assume that they can’t monetize their own blog unless they’re really famous.
A few hundred dollars a month from your blog is absolutely within the reach of any professional out there. If you do everything right, and put in the work required, your blog can even make you thousands of dollars, both directly and indirectly.
My technical blogs make me a few thousand dollars every month, and I often end up not touching them for weeks at the time. Blogging is not passive income, but if you know what you are doing, all the content you produce compounds and ends up providing you with a substantial income – even when you neglect the blog for a few weeks or months at a time.
Blogging can provide you with some serious extra income that you can then use to finance your hobby, buy gadgets, pay off debt, or do whatever else you desire. It’s a really nice feeling to receive a few extra checks each month, and it will further motivate you to continue blogging.
In my book I cover in great detail how I go about monetizing my blogs, but I’ll also talk more about this subject on this site (subscribe via feed or email if you’d like to be notified of such future articles).
7. Blogging can score you freebies
Publishers and PR firms have become aware of the influence bloggers have on targeted audiences. Even as a mildly successful blogger, you can expect to be contacted by a multitude of people offering you freebies. Depending on your niche and field, these offers will typically be for books, but it’s not uncommon to receive offers for other items, including tickets for conferences, gadgets, software, etc.
As long as you disclose your affiliation (in a way that makes the FTC happy), it’s actually very nice to routinely receive freebies of this kind. If you like what you receive, you can then blog about that product and review it for your readers.
Often, if you establish good relationships with publishers and PR firms, you can even organize giveaway contests which benefit your readers, not just yourself.
8. Blogging can advance your career
A few of the previous benefits I mentioned have already revealed how blogging can have a positive impact in your career. However, I’d like to stress just how much blogging can open certain doors for you. Every post you make is a new opportunity to get people to notice you on a professional level.
Because of my blogs, but primarily my programming one, I’ve received countless job offers over the years, including some from a selection of the largest and most sought after companies in the world. Some offered me generous relocation packages to the US, and a few went so far as to offer me the job, no questions asked (e.g., they didn’t even require a formal interview, they had sized me up enough through my blog writing).
I got my job at IBM in Canada mainly thanks to my blog (at the time I was still in Europe).
Whether blogging allows you to find a new job, customers, partners, investors, publishers who are interested in having you authoring a book, or something else entirely, it is certainly a great career booster.
In fact, my number one piece of advice for new professionals who are interested in building their careers is to start blogging today.
9. Blogging can make you popular in your field
Most professionals work hard because they want to be successful and gain recogniztion in their field. Blogging aides with that and can make small celebrities out of regular professionals. For those in the tech world, this is not an uncommon occurrence. Names like Joel Spolsky, Derek Sivers, Steve Yegge, and Scott Hanselman come to mind.
I’m reminded of Joey Roth’s “Charlatan, Martyr, Hustler” poster. If you do incredible work but nobody knows about it you are a martyr. If you accomplish nothing and do no work, but talk a sweet talk, you are a charlatan. If you can walk the walk, and talk the talk, then you are a hustler.
Blogging helps you ensure that you can talk the talk and reach the right audience, once you have walked the walk.
10. Blogging can help you reach and teach a wide audience
The number one reason to blog for many people, is the desire to share their knowledge and teach others.
For some, even in the technical realm, it’s a matter of politics. For example, an Agile development professional may actually want to influence the community and advocate his theories and ideas about the process of developing software, so that they (potentially) become widespread.
Others, may use this teaching tool to promote their technical projects. An example, also from the software development world, is blogging to help people become aware, loyal, and eventually proficient in an open source tool that you created.

As you can imagine, these are just some of the many benefits of blogging. As you begin creating your own blog posts, you’ll likely find that some of them fall into place organically, whereas you need to work at others. All however, stand to enrich your career and life, and help inspire you to keep blogging for years to come.
Tresa John J
 
Dec 23, 2014

Good

5 Common Blogging Mistakes Made by Startups
June 22, 2012 By Antonio Cangiano 20 Comments

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Note: I, and this blog, are back after a hiatus caused by my recent cross country relocation, during which I shifted from life on the east coast to calling the beautiful west my new home. Now that I’m properly settled in, it’s high time we got back to business. Talk about bad timing though — my book went live as the moving truck was leaving.
Blogs are an excellent tool for promoting your startup or business. If you’re not careful however, it’s easy to end up putting in a lot of effort into something that yields little in the way of reward. The following is a series of common blogging pitfalls that entrepreneurs should be aware of and which you’ll want to address when it comes to your own blog.
Blogging mistake #1: Not prominently linking to your main site

It can be extremely irritating for visitors to arrive on your blog, and not have an easy way to reach your main site. Yes, the reader could remove blog. or /blog/ from their address bar, but you should work under the assumption that inertia is a strong force. If it takes more than a negligible effort, a large percentage of visitors won’t bother doing it.
One of the chief goals of your blog is to get people to check out your product. You need to make this process as easy as possible.
How to fix it
Link to the homepage or landing page of your choice from within your navigation bar. Home should link to your main site’s homepage, not your blog’s index. Call that link within the navigation bar Blog instead.
If your main site’s logo is present at the top of your blog template, have it link to the main site.
If the main site’s logo is not included in the template, add such a logo or a fairly good sized icon derived from it within your sidebar, then link that to the main site.
Finally, link generously to the product or service when you mention it, be it from a short description in your sidebar or from within your posts. You want a person to look at your blog for a second, blink, and immediately know where to click to check out your offer.
Blogging mistake #2: Not integrating with social properties

Typically you opt to have a social presence on sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ because you assume that doing so will help you reach a wider audience. If your site and these social properties are entirely separate spheres unto themselves however, you won’t capture the true value that they can offer.
It’s a mistake not to link back to your main site from these sites. That’s obvious. What might not be so obvious, is that it’s also a mistake not to promote these social properties from within your blog. In fact, properties such as your Facebook fan page, can help show your visitors that you are more than just an anonymous, faceless company. If you do a good job on these social sites, you can demonstrate how you interact with your community of customers and fans, to prospective customers.
Linking to your social properties also acts as social proof. When someone sees a large number of fans or followers, it leads them to consider you as being more authoritative, established, or worth following as well. And since you are showcasing these properties to your blog visitors, this will in turn boost these numbers and increase further your social proof.
Finally, it’s a mistake not to promote your blog posts on social properties. For example, when someone likes your fan page on Facebook, they subscribe to your updates there. By posting a link to your articles within that page on Facebook, you automatically reach visitors who may have otherwise vanished for good after their first visit to your blog.
How to fix it
Link to your main site from social media properties that allow you to do so.
Add a Facebook Like widget, a Twitter follow button, and +1 button to your sidebar. Note that this Facebook widget should be used to get people to like your fan page (therefore subscribing to your updates) and not your site. Specify the former URL, rather than the latter, when configuring the widget. Show faces when it comes to Facebook, as they are very effective at helping you immediately connect and capture the interest of your readers (after all, you’re showing them faces of their friends who like you, a quasi-direct endorsement for you).
Post a link to your new posts on all of your chosen target properties. TwitterFeed is one of many available tools that can take care of automatically posting your RSS to social sites (currently, both Twitter and Facebook are covered). But even doing it manually, if you so choose to, does not take much of your time.
Include a widget such as AddThis or ShareThis within your template, so that your individual posts can be liked, shared on Twitter, and posted on a variety of other sites by your readers. If possible, favor quality over quantity and opt for buttons that include counters (again, for social proof).
Blogging mistake #3: Making it harder to subscribe to, and regularly follow, your blog

Blogs that don’t make it easy to subscribe to new content rarely achieve a great deal of success. These day, browsers like Firefox and Chrome even ignore auto-discovered syndication feeds, making the process of subscription much harder.
You might think that RSS doesn’t matter anymore. In truth it does matter — more than most people assume actually. Even conceding for a second that your prospective customers are not the right demographic for feeds, you still need to provide and promote ways for them to keep up with your new content. You simply cannot expect them to come back to your site periodically.
How to fix it
Keep track of your subscription stats via FeedBurner.
Have a large orange RSS icon linked to your feed URL (see mine as an example).
Include a way to receive your new posts via email. You can use FeedBurner (enable it through Publicize -> Email Subscriptions) or much more ideally, set up your own mailing list with a service like Mailchimp (that’s what I use and I highly recommend it). Mailing lists are one of the biggest assets you can have as a business, virtually regardless of what you do. Set one up even if your crowd is technical. Include the signup widget near the top of your template, like I’ve done here in the sidebar. You can then setup an RSS-to-email campaign within Mailchimp to have your new posts automatically appear in your subscribers’ inboxes.
At the bottom of your posts invite readers to subscribe either via RSS or by email. You can generally accomplish this by modifying a template file or using the option to do so (if provided) within your blog’s software. For this blog, I use a plugin for the Genesis framework (i.e., Simple Hooks).
Blogging mistake #4: Only blogging about product announcements

While you certainly should use your blog to talk about and promote your products, unless you have more than one blog, it would be a big mistake to focus your site just on announcements about your products. You’d be missing out on the true marketing power of your blog if you went this route.
How to fix it
Write for the audience you want to attract. If you prospective SaaS customers are people who intend to lose weight, don’t spend 90% of your blog time discussing cool features you introduced in your app. Instead, write about topics that interest this particular demographic such as weight loss, fat burning, healthy foods, lean mass gain, etc. This way you’ll gather a community around that topic. Make it the blog that absolutely anyone who is losing weight should follow, whether they use your app or not. All the readers that you’ll attract will be exposed to your product either by sheer branding (ergo the importance of logos and links in the template mentioned previously) or by following your blog regularly, and then ending up reading your occasional bona fide product announcements.
Even when announcing a feature or posting about a product promotion, try to focus on how this will benefit the reader. Tell a story. Don’t just write a dry announcement. For example, if you are talking about an Android version of your app for dieters, talk about how stressful it is to try and keep track of calories when dining on the go, and how this new addition to your product line up will facilitate the lives of those who use your product.
Focusing on providing value for your readers, rather than just pushing a sale, will greatly help you increase your business. This will in fact make you come across as more trustworthy and genuine, as well as help you establish yourself as an expert in your field. If I trust you and consider you to be an expert, I’m willing to buy from you and your recommendations.
Have a small blurb or banner ad for your products at the bottom of your posts, rather than each post just being an ad itself for your products.
Blogging mistake #5: Hiding what your product is about

I hate it when I’m five minutes into a post of a startup, and I have no idea what these guys actually do or what they’re trying to sell me. This is far more common than it should be.
How to fix it
Have a small description at the top of your blog (typically in the sidebar) that explains who you are and what you do. (e.g., “Acme Fat Loss” is a web application that helps you lose weight by tracking calories and suggesting recipes that are within your daily calorie allotment”).
If your post has anything to do with your product, quickly introduce what your product does within your post. Don’t just assume everyone knows. For example, “The investment we received means that we’ll be able to allocate far more resources to the development of our calorie tracker and healthy recipe generator application”.
These are not by any means the only mistakes businesses do when trying to succeed at blogging. They are however some of the major, and perhaps most common, ones. Thankfully simple, effective fixes, as shown, are far from hard to implement and can be such a massive boon to you and your company.
Tresa John J
 
Dec 23, 2014

Some What to Get that

6 Reasons Why the Amazon Associates Affiliate Program Is Highly Underrated
June 25, 2012 By Antonio Cangiano 47 Comments

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Amazon Associates
It is natural for bloggers who start to gather a following to consider revenue opportunities to reward their time and effort.
Google AdSense is a popular option for its plug and play nature. Sadly, it tends to be a disappointing source of income for most bloggers. The average RPM (revenue per thousand impressions of an ad) is fairly low in most niches, so you won’t get much side income from AdSense unless you have a very large audience. For example, if you average $3 RPM, you need a thousand visitors per day to pay for your daily latte (or more if you frequent Starbucks).
Bloggers who look around and explore their options a little more in-depth, may find the lucrative world of affiliate marketing. It’s a simple idea really. Imagine that I create a product and then want you to help me sell as many of it as possible. You, the affiliate, will promote the product for me through your blog. When a sale is made thanks to you (we’ll track that through a special link and browser cookies), I’ll give a portion of that sale to you. The percentage varies but it can be very high, with 50% being the norm for digital products.
If you are unscrupulous you could promote all sort of junk to make a buck, whether you honestly think it’s worth recommending or not. You could even promote products that you down right know suck, and still get your cut. And it turns out people actually do just this. As a result, affiliate marketers have a very bad reputation, despite there being nothing inherently wrong with receiving money for providing a marketing service.
Amazon Associates was one of the earliest and, currently, largest affiliate programs around. The operating margins are much smaller for Amazon, so the percentage that you get for each sale is rather small compared to that of most products online. We’re talking about 4-8.50% for most items, instead of the 50-75% you’d get from other digital products you could be promoting. Furthermore, with Amazon you don’t generally receive recurring referral revenue like you do with other digital products that charge a monthly fee and not a one-off fee.
Amazon’s operating agreement also requires you to be above-board when it comes to the way you go about promoting their products. Other affiliate programs online may gladly close one eye on your techniques if you are moving sales and making them money.
To further make Amazon less appealing to some affiliates, the referral cookie only lasts 24 hours, versus 30 or 60 days, which is common for online sales of digital products. This means that if you refer someone to Amazon.com today, and they were to buy a product three days from now, you won’t be getting anything at all. With more common affiliate relationships, you’d be getting a cut even if the user were to make a purchasing decision a month and a half after the first visit you generated (assuming that they didn’t clear their cookies, that is).
As a result, Amazon Associates is often ignored or berated by large affiliates. In fact it’s even a much underrated revenue option among bloggers. Amazon, and not AdSense, should be the first go-to option for bloggers looking to earn some money from their blogs. Amazon Associates is, and has been for years now, my number one source of blogging income.
To make this case, below I list a series of reasons why I recommend giving Amazon Associates a serious shot, despite its shortcomings.
Reason #1: Amazon Associates is straightforward and dependable

Once you sign up and provide the details of how you’d like to be paid (cheque, direct deposit, or gift certificate) you’ll receive your payments once you’ve reached or crossed the pre-established threshold limit (e.g., $100, with a two month delay for the payment). If you move enough sales, after two months, you’ll be receiving a steady monthly paycheck from them.
Other affiliate programs can make you jump through hoops to sign up and get approved (e.g., eBay’s affiliate program), or may require certain conditions to be met before issuing payments (e.g., ClickBank’s requirement for five different credit card purchases before releasing the funds, which progressively reduces the amount that you’re owed over time until you get those five separate credit card payments).
Reason #2: Amazon’s cookie has site-wide coverage, and is not just limited to a specific product

Yes, you only get a 24-hour window, but in that timeframe you’ll get a cut of anything a referred visitor buys, not just the product you pointed out to them. I’ve had visitors buy all sorts of expensive and odd items when they left my site to check out a $10 book on Amazon. And trust me, pink vibrators can add up quickly. :)
Reason #3: Amazon has a humongous inventory of extremely reputable products

You don’t have to promote “belly fat secrets” on your blog to make a buck. Their huge selection of high-quality books and other products, means that you can be selective and only recommend or point out items you truly believe are worth your readers’ time and investment. You can select books that are entirely relevant to your topic of expertise, and review products you have actually read/tried/consumed.
Reason #4: People trust Amazon

Being such a well established household name implies that most of your visitors won’t think twice about putting a purchase through on Amazon. Many will have accounts already, and perhaps even have their credit card stored on the site for quick checkouts. This in turn means that more people will buy instead of second guessing whether it’s safe to use the shopping cart.
Reason #5: Amazon is a master at converting visitors into customers

Amazon spends millions of dollars in research to optimize the amount of sales they squeeze out of new and existing customers. All you really need to do is send people to Amazon and they’ll do a good job themselves for the most part. Of course, if you are considered a trustworthy expert in your field and you send people to Amazon to check out a specific item, your conversion rate will be even higher.
Reason #6: The percentage of your cut raises in a given month, as you sell more items

The more products you sell, the greater the percentage of your total sales will be awarded to you. You start at a very low 4%, but can reach the 8% range in a relatively short amount of time (if your sales are good).
Amazon volume rates
I strongly encourage you to give Amazon Associates a go.
Update: Several people wrote me asking for further details on how to make money with the Amazon Associates program. I’ll repeat here what I suggested privately via email:
Niche Profit Course by Chris Guthrie. This video course on Amazon Associates is amazing and I highly recommend it to anyone. It’s full of legitimate information on how to make a lot of extra income from your site through Amazon. I’ve taken several courses on the subject and this is the best one in my opinion.
In my book on technical blogging, I go in-depth about techniques that can help ensure that you get most out of this program (including statistics about my income, if you need further guidance to maximize your own earnings).
The Easy Azon plugin is super-handy and a time saver if you plan to feature Amazon links in your WordPress-based blog or site.
5 Common Blogging Mistakes Made by Startups
June 22, 2012 By Antonio Cangiano 20 Comments

51
Note: I, and this blog, are back after a hiatus caused by my recent cross country relocation, during which I shifted from life on the east coast to calling the beautiful west my new home. Now that I’m properly settled in, it’s high time we got back to business. Talk about bad timing though — my book went live as the moving truck was leaving.
Blogs are an excellent tool for promoting your startup or business. If you’re not careful however, it’s easy to end up putting in a lot of effort into something that yields little in the way of reward. The following is a series of common blogging pitfalls that entrepreneurs should be aware of and which you’ll want to address when it comes to your own blog.
Blogging mistake #1: Not prominently linking to your main site

It can be extremely irritating for visitors to arrive on your blog, and not have an easy way to reach your main site. Yes, the reader could remove blog. or /blog/ from their address bar, but you should work under the assumption that inertia is a strong force. If it takes more than a negligible effort, a large percentage of visitors won’t bother doing it.
One of the chief goals of your blog is to get people to check out your product. You need to make this process as easy as possible.
How to fix it
Link to the homepage or landing page of your choice from within your navigation bar. Home should link to your main site’s homepage, not your blog’s index. Call that link within the navigation bar Blog instead.
If your main site’s logo is present at the top of your blog template, have it link to the main site.
If the main site’s logo is not included in the template, add such a logo or a fairly good sized icon derived from it within your sidebar, then link that to the main site.
Finally, link generously to the product or service when you mention it, be it from a short description in your sidebar or from within your posts. You want a person to look at your blog for a second, blink, and immediately know where to click to check out your offer.
Blogging mistake #2: Not integrating with social properties

Typically you opt to have a social presence on sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ because you assume that doing so will help you reach a wider audience. If your site and these social properties are entirely separate spheres unto themselves however, you won’t capture the true value that they can offer.
It’s a mistake not to link back to your main site from these sites. That’s obvious. What might not be so obvious, is that it’s also a mistake not to promote these social properties from within your blog. In fact, properties such as your Facebook fan page, can help show your visitors that you are more than just an anonymous, faceless company. If you do a good job on these social sites, you can demonstrate how you interact with your community of customers and fans, to prospective customers.
Linking to your social properties also acts as social proof. When someone sees a large number of fans or followers, it leads them to consider you as being more authoritative, established, or worth following as well. And since you are showcasing these properties to your blog visitors, this will in turn boost these numbers and increase further your social proof.
Finally, it’s a mistake not to promote your blog posts on social properties. For example, when someone likes your fan page on Facebook, they subscribe to your updates there. By posting a link to your articles within that page on Facebook, you automatically reach visitors who may have otherwise vanished for good after their first visit to your blog.
How to fix it
Link to your main site from social media properties that allow you to do so.
Add a Facebook Like widget, a Twitter follow button, and +1 button to your sidebar. Note that this Facebook widget should be used to get people to like your fan page (therefore subscribing to your updates) and not your site. Specify the former URL, rather than the latter, when configuring the widget. Show faces when it comes to Facebook, as they are very effective at helping you immediately connect and capture the interest of your readers (after all, you’re showing them faces of their friends who like you, a quasi-direct endorsement for you).
Post a link to your new posts on all of your chosen target properties. TwitterFeed is one of many available tools that can take care of automatically posting your RSS to social sites (currently, both Twitter and Facebook are covered). But even doing it manually, if you so choose to, does not take much of your time.
Include a widget such as AddThis or ShareThis within your template, so that your individual posts can be liked, shared on Twitter, and posted on a variety of other sites by your readers. If possible, favor quality over quantity and opt for buttons that include counters (again, for social proof).
Blogging mistake #3: Making it harder to subscribe to, and regularly follow, your blog

Blogs that don’t make it easy to subscribe to new content rarely achieve a great deal of success. These day, browsers like Firefox and Chrome even ignore auto-discovered syndication feeds, making the process of subscription much harder.
You might think that RSS doesn’t matter anymore. In truth it does matter — more than most people assume actually. Even conceding for a second that your prospective customers are not the right demographic for feeds, you still need to provide and promote ways for them to keep up with your new content. You simply cannot expect them to come back to your site periodically.
How to fix it
Keep track of your subscription stats via FeedBurner.
Have a large orange RSS icon linked to your feed URL (see mine as an example).
Include a way to receive your new posts via email. You can use FeedBurner (enable it through Publicize -> Email Subscriptions) or much more ideally, set up your own mailing list with a service like Mailchimp (that’s what I use and I highly recommend it). Mailing lists are one of the biggest assets you can have as a business, virtually regardless of what you do. Set one up even if your crowd is technical. Include the signup widget near the top of your template, like I’ve done here in the sidebar. You can then setup an RSS-to-email campaign within Mailchimp to have your new posts automatically appear in your subscribers’ inboxes.
At the bottom of your posts invite readers to subscribe either via RSS or by email. You can generally accomplish this by modifying a template file or using the option to do so (if provided) within your blog’s software. For this blog, I use a plugin for the Genesis framework (i.e., Simple Hooks).
Blogging mistake #4: Only blogging about product announcements

While you certainly should use your blog to talk about and promote your products, unless you have more than one blog, it would be a big mistake to focus your site just on announcements about your products. You’d be missing out on the true marketing power of your blog if you went this route.
How to fix it
Write for the audience you want to attract. If you prospective SaaS customers are people who intend to lose weight, don’t spend 90% of your blog time discussing cool features you introduced in your app. Instead, write about topics that interest this particular demographic such as weight loss, fat burning, healthy foods, lean mass gain, etc. This way you’ll gather a community around that topic. Make it the blog that absolutely anyone who is losing weight should follow, whether they use your app or not. All the readers that you’ll attract will be exposed to your product either by sheer branding (ergo the importance of logos and links in the template mentioned previously) or by following your blog regularly, and then ending up reading your occasional bona fide product announcements.
Even when announcing a feature or posting about a product promotion, try to focus on how this will benefit the reader. Tell a story. Don’t just write a dry announcement. For example, if you are talking about an Android version of your app for dieters, talk about how stressful it is to try and keep track of calories when dining on the go, and how this new addition to your product line up will facilitate the lives of those who use your product.
Focusing on providing value for your readers, rather than just pushing a sale, will greatly help you increase your business. This will in fact make you come across as more trustworthy and genuine, as well as help you establish yourself as an expert in your field. If I trust you and consider you to be an expert, I’m willing to buy from you and your recommendations.
Have a small blurb or banner ad for your products at the bottom of your posts, rather than each post just being an ad itself for your products.
Blogging mistake #5: Hiding what your product is about

I hate it when I’m five minutes into a post of a startup, and I have no idea what these guys actually do or what they’re trying to sell me. This is far more common than it should be.
How to fix it
Have a small description at the top of your blog (typically in the sidebar) that explains who you are and what you do. (e.g., “Acme Fat Loss” is a web application that helps you lose weight by tracking calories and suggesting recipes that are within your daily calorie allotment”).
If your post has anything to do with your product, quickly introduce what your product does within your post. Don’t just assume everyone knows. For example, “The investment we received means that we’ll be able to allocate far more resources to the development of our calorie tracker and healthy recipe generator application”.
These are not by any means the only mistakes businesses do when trying to succeed at blogging. They are however some of the major, and perhaps most common, ones. Thankfully simple, effective fixes, as shown, are far from hard to implement and can be such a massive boon to you and your company.
Rajab Hs
 
Dec 23, 2014

Verdict

Google Killed the RSS Feed
November 12, 2014 By Antonio Cangiano Leave a Comment

1
The RSS feed is in a coma. Google put it in that state and, boy, have they ever dropped the ball on this one.
Video Killed the Radio Star
It all started with Google’s attempt to steer their huge ship towards the mythical land of all things Social. You see, Facebook’s success really took a few giant tech companies by surprise. Google in particular. Surely, they thought to themselves, we must be able to compete.
So instead of focusing on their core competency, they decided to start throwing Social everywhere. It showed up in their search results. It was pushed down your Gmail throat. You had to have a Google+ account to use Google’s services in any capacity. UI and accounts got more and more confusing. YouTubers weren’t spared either.
Oh, and they wanted your real name, like Facebook. If you are secretly transgender or wanted by the Iranian government, tough luck, kiddo. (The relative lack of Social success and massive protests have eventually led them to change their initial policy.)
So what does this circus has to do with the RSS feed? Well, when you’re wearing Social blinders, that’s all you can see. They discontinued most of their services that couldn’t be adopted to this narrow world view.
Google Reader, the first successful attempt at making RSS feeds somewhat mainstream, was shut down. Instead of this handy service that was already loved by millions around the world, they wanted you to share articles on their social network. Follow people, put them in circles, and generally pretend you were on Facebook. There, they figured, no need to properly follow a feed with the purpose of never missing a new article. Good stuff will bubble up to the surface. Hopefully.
To round things off, they also got rid of the RSS button in Chrome so that finding the feed for a site is now a decent first exercise in learning HTML programming for the general public.
These two simple steps by Google have pretty much mortally wounded the RSS feed. It won’t recover I’m afraid and it’s a damn shame. A minority of geeks will continue to use the technology via services like Feedly, but the mainstream dream is gone.
All for a social network that relatively few people use, let alone in any serious capacity (at least in part because Google stubbornly refuses to open their API to allow third-party apps, like Buffer and Hootsuite, to post on people’s own profiles).
If you think I’m just talking hypothetically, think again. I saw one of my blogs go from a healthy 16,000 RSS subscribers to less than 300 in the span of just a month or so after this change was made (many, including my wife, who is a popular blogger in her field, witnessed the same sort of abrupt, brutal nosedive with her RSS numbers as well).
From a blogger’s perspective, this irreversible change has some serious implications:
Email subscriptions have never been more important. Unlike Facebook subscribers or Twitter followers who will rarely see your updates, emails are still being read and given a certain importance by the subscriber (Google is trying to mess this up too, but that’s a whole other post). You need to capture people’s email as it’s the only guaranteed delivery method for your updates that you have. (On that note, you can subscribe here.)
Feel free to maximize your social media properties and efforts, engage and entertain users, but have an email subscription as your ultimate call to action.
For the sake of us geeks who are unwilling to give up the good fight, do be sure to prominently feature an RSS feed link/button on your blog or site.
If your audience is not technical, consider having a ‘How to follow this blog’ link with step-by-step instructions on using Feedly or Bloglovin (the latter of which is particularly popular among women).
It’s an unfortunate turn of events that has damaged blogging in an untold number of ways. Thankfully, it hasn’t killed things off entirely though, especially if we are willing to adapt.
Why Should I Care About Your Blog?
January 16, 2013 By Antonio Cangiano 4 Comments

9
When I visit a blog for the first time, I usually have one key question in the back of my mind, “Why should I care about this blog?”. There is no shortage of blogs and articles online, and in the face of such a huge volume of written content, why should I spend my limited time reading your blog?
Sure, if I Googled for a specific question and your blog came up on the first page of results, I might read what you have to say, but unless you can provide a compelling, convincing and satisfying answer to that lingering question before I close my browser tab, I’m likely gone forever.
This means your site needs to answer this key question within a few seconds or, at best, a couple of minutes. That’s a challenging task for sure. You can’t write an essay trying to convince someone that they should stick around, subscribe to your site, or take a keen interest in you, because chances are a given reader will leave before they’ve even read that post. Therefore, as is often the case in life, first impressions really do count.
I’m not claiming you need a gorgeous looking blog, though having one certainly doesn’t hurt either. What I’m talking about is answering the pressing question at hand by presenting an obvious answer. You’re aiming for an answer that can be inferred immediately upon visiting your blog.
The following are a few variables that can be used to answer the important question that this post’s title asks.
Your content

The most frequent interaction visitors will have with your blog is through a random post. If your content is good, readers may naturally assume you talk about that particular topic on an ongoing basis and appreciate the way you’ve covered it.
Providing value to the reader in each and every post, ensures — above all else — that the user will feel a rapid connection with your blog and a have justified reason to care about it.
Your blog title

Explicit is better than implicit. Your title should explain to the user what your blog is about. Obviously there are some popular exceptions of sites that have succeeded with seemingly meaningless titles, but you are unlikely to be a statistical outlier like those sites. As such, why not do yourself a favour and opt for a great name that really explains what your site is all about from the get-go?
Take any advantage you can get to convey the essence of your blog through your title. “John’s Personal Blog”, for example, doesn’t mean anything to me, the viewer. Why should I care, and what is the site actually about? “John’s Travel Adventures” is a better starting point (assuming I’m interested in travel).
Your tagline

Your blog’s tagline should sell your blog to the reader. You want it to not only continue to explain what your site is about, but to also introduce some form of benefit to your visitors. For this site, mine is:
Grow your audience and make money online by sharing your knowledge.
Assuming you are interested in gaining popularity through technical writing or in making extra cash by blogging, this should sound appealing to you, the reader, and succinctly provide you with an answer regarding why you should care about it.
In the example of John’s travel blog, a tagline like, “How I travel throughout the world on a shoestring budget” would narrow the focus of the site to a certain type of travel. If a visitor falls into this audience, they would likely care about John’s site because they also would enjoy traveling around the world on the cheap.
Your about

What’s in it for them? Your sidebar blurb (if any) and your About section should do a detailed job of explaining what your blog is about, what you cover within it, and what benefits it will bring to your readers. My About starts with the following two paragraphs:
Technical Blogging is a blog dedicated to relentlessly helping bloggers and entrepreneurs succeed online.
Our aim is to provide you with all the practical information you need to start and grow a successful technical blog (as opposed to a personal blog about your kids).
Note how this isn’t really about me. It’s about the reader and what I can help them with.
I then go on to include a Who is this for? section which explicitly tells the reader if they’re the right audience for the type of content I intend to unleash to the world. Finally, the page ends with a list of reasons why you might want to trust me on the topic of blogging.
Don’t forget to include a picture of yourself to connect at a more “primal” level with your visitors. Including a small picture of yourself within the sidebar is also a good idea (only a few people will check out your about page).
Your ‘start here’

A powerful way to guide the user towards a deeper understanding of why your blog is worth paying attention and subscribing to is provide them with more than just the specific article they landed on.
On some blogs you might have seen a link within posts that says something along the lines of, “If you’re new around here, check out our Start Here page”. From there the viewer will be sent through a rabbit hole of some of your best, and most organized, content that provides both the bigger picture and immediate value to the reader. (See this page for example.)
Get these fundamentals right to better answer the “Why should I care about this blog?” question your visitors will have. Then integrate opportune calls to action to subscribe via RSS, email, etc. You will grant yourself a higher degree of conversion from random viewers to regular readers. It really is as simple as that.

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