Log inRegister
Submit Complaint

Clinic dermatech

India,
Delhi

Consumer complaints and reviews about Clinic dermatech

Sonam Rastogi
 
Jul 12, 2020

No output fake commitment

I took breast reduction Sergery from clinic Dermatech Preet vihar branch. But I have not got any results yet I invested my body but the size are still same

The entire treatment was not correctly mentioned on me before the Sergery. I paid hell amount of money for this But they didn't even gave me a bill. Now they are not responding on my call even if I visited they are not talk to me properly they are not providing any solution of this

I thing i had wastes my money as i got zero result.... very poor output... really disappointed...no customer satisfaction..... pathetic staff....

I would suggest you guys please don't go there they are only running a scam.
Sulekhatyagi111
 
Sep 25, 2018

Zero Result

I took co2 fractional laser services from clinic Dermatech safardarjug enclave. The interval between laser sessions has increased beyond the 30 days due to technical issues.

The entire treatment was not correctly mentioned on my card. I paid for removal of males also. But they didn't mention it in my card as they said it includes in the co2 laser. Now they denied to provide me the same.

I thing i had wastes my money as i got zero result.... very poor output... really disappointed...
Sulekhatyagi111
 
Sep 25, 2018

Zero Result

I took co2 fractional laser services from dermatech safdarjung enclave.

My entire treatment was not correctly and completely prescribed on my card.

They gave me removal of moles services also but not written in my card. Thereafter they denied to provide me the same.

Also, interval between laser sessions has increased twice beyond 30 days due to technical issues. I think, I had wastes my money as i got zero result.... Really disappointed.
Lalit Chaudhary1987
 
Mar 19, 2018

Zero Output_Poor Service_Illogical excuses

I started my hair reduction and beard shaping treatment last year from Clinic Dermatech, Safdarjung Enclave,New Delhi. They asked me to provide 8 sittings of hair reduction and 9 sitting of beard shaping but after sixth sitting, i did not get any desired result. The results were really bad. I asked them to provide some more sittings because i am not getting desired result.They gave some illogical excuses.
Really bad bad experience.
I will never recommend any person for Clinic Dermatech.
Anchal Rajput¹¹
 
Nov 22, 2017

Complain

Unprofessional people and a big cheater group . They took money for 5 settings but they provide me only 2 sittings out of 5 now they are saying that you sittings are completed. Ms Radha comment this commitment and now some Shakshi her no is +91 89 05 320330 is saying that there are no more settings. Seriously big cheater group.
Simpy r
 
May 6, 2017

No output... zero result

Hi
I had taken serices fron dermatech.
I got zero result. Really disappilointed with the output.i think i had wasted my money.
I won't take servies even free of cost in future.
Totaly wastage of money and time.
M totaly unsatisfied with the result.
Simpy r
 
May 6, 2017

No output... zero result

Hi

I have taken services from dermatech. Staff behaviur, services, envirnment, etc, every thing was perfect except one thing ... and that is RESULT...
I thing i had wastes my money as i got zero result.... very poor output... realyy disappointed...
niks16
 
Mar 15, 2017

mishave and poor services offer

want to loadge a complain against gip noida dermatech clinic the behaviour of asha , babli are worst there i am the regular client of yours from last 2yrs bt everytime when try to book my appoinment babli do mishave with me shouts at me and they are not giving me the authentic services when i visited always try to make me fool by using duplicate peel treatments instead of my demanding as per my package also i rely fead up and suffers alot from your staff behave and services at gip clinic i seriously file complain to the vonsumer court also cz when clients visits they make very high commitments but never give the services as per their commitmnets only its a prank to mislead the customer only snatching money n book the package for their commisiion i sersly took action against you this time for all fake commitmnts and services offered but never i got and i am rely disatisfy from you all
DDr
 
Jun 4, 2016

Pathetic behaviour of client

Pathetic behaviour of client
I am regular client of swasth vihar clinic dermatec .I have taken hair reduction package.i am happy with my sevices and staff.but I have complain about those client who are late on there appointment, 5 min,10 min 15 min, 20 min etc.i have no problem but problem is that one client late make other people on wait. If we late feel sry and if staff get late we starting judging and shouting on staff and shout in clinic that wrong this is due to some clients fault.this thing I saw many time in clinic that client unusually shout and disturb all client and staff.i complain to staff why you entertain those client ,they reply calmly mam all client are important for us and we respect the time of client.
I request those client please behave like human being not animal,if you are not late in your life in any where than shout.please other time .
Because your behaviour not disturbing you but us also.if we shout on you that what will happen imagin and than behave .
Thank you
Vijay Parihar
 
May 21, 2016

Pathetic service by Swasthya Vihar branch

I had taken beauty tech package from Clinic Dermatech - swastheya Vihar . First 13 sitting were OK since one guy Lalit was personally attending and giving good service . Post that I was given appointments and the same were cancelled at 11th hour and I had canceled my other plans due to this appointment.

However your team apologized and I attended 14th session after a gap of 2 weeks.

For my last session, I was given appointment twice and then cancelled. Last time having got the final confirmation I visited the clinic as per the time given to me. To my utter surprise clinic was not even opened till 9.15 AM though I had appointment of 9.00AM.

I was asked to wait for some time. I waited for next 45 minutes and after that I was rudely told that the person has not turned up. I have no words to express my frustration. Even after that 2 weeks passed and no one bothered to speak to me and given appointment. Today suddenly I got a call for appointment tomorrow. I am no more interested in final session Can anyone from Dermatech answer following:

1. You guys charge so much from the customers then why customer is always take for ride. Why your team does nto have customer centric approach?/
2. Why no prior information is given well in advance if you need to cancel any appointment

I would never suggest anyone to go for any type of treatment with Dermatech based on my horrible experience
Alia Bhat
 
Jan 24, 2016

Didn't give complete sessions

I recently moved to the area and was putting off getting my brows done because my previous girl was amazing. After reading the reviews, I was sold. I arrived and was taken immediately. I told Gita this was my first time laser treatment and was switching because of breaking out from waxing. She explained the process well and even used a special aloe lotion to avoid future breakouts. Because of the $15 card limit I purchased two future visits. I am glad to have found Gita and will be a regular. Be sure to bring cash for tips!!

Based on my one time experience, I REALLY WISH I discovered this salon sooner. It's unfortunate that I will be moving soon, but if I am ever back in town I will 100% be back! The other salon, that I usually go to for my waxing, couldn't fit me in at the last moment (aka today), so I decided to go online and quickly find another place with good reviews.

I called in, was greeted on the phone instantly, and booked an appointment within the SAME afternoon. Talk about EFFICIENT! I got to my appointment 10 minutes early, someone welcomed me right away, and was taken to a private room in the back within minutes of arriving. This has never happened to me before, I'm usually waiting for about 20-30 minutes in the waiting area. The place wasn't empty either, there were a handful of customers already inside. Since I was a first time customer, I filled out a basic questionnaire saying that I wasn't on accutane, or other medications, and disclosed allergies.

The lady waxing me was very friendly and sweet because let's admit it...beauty is pain :( Also, she worked fast so I wasn't too uncomfortable. My wax job was done in about 15 minutes and I was on my way to my next errand.

***5/5 for atmosphere, timeliness, efficiency, AND staff!

Tip: This place is in the same strip mall area as the Toy's R Us (incase you have trouble finding it).
I started coming here after my beloved Rivaz closed in Naperville. This place is across the street from me and super cheap ($5). They have done my eyebrows wonderfully every time!

This is my new eyebrow place! Great, fast service!

They have a minimum charge of 15 on a card, so bring cash for service and tip. I like to have them charge me the 15 on the card so that they can give me Eyebrow certificates for future use.
Hands down the best eyebrow place I've been to. I've tried out a lot of different places and nothing compares to Beauty Concepts. Gita is the best there is with threading - she leaves them flawless every time and she's gentle while she threads - which is important because threading can hurt in general. Not only are their services top notch but their prices are very reasonable. You can't beat this place!!
Rahul Vadhwa Arora
 
Jan 11, 2016

worst treatment - 20 Burns and Increased hair growth

682 of 771 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 starsRare Pathways to Exceptionally Increased Prosperity
ByDonald Mitchellon October 16, 2001
This study was stimulated by Mr. Bill Meehan's (head of McKinsey in San Francisco) observation that Built to Last wasn't very helpful to companies, because the firms studied had always been great. Most companies have been good, and never great. What should these firms do?
Jim Collins and his team have done an enormous amount of interesting work to determine whether a good company can be come a great company, and how. The answer to the former question is "yes," assuming that the 11 of 1435 Fortune 500 companies did not make it there by accident. The answer to the latter is less clear. The study group identified a number of characteristics that their 11 companies had in common, which were much less frequently present in comparison companies. However, the study inexplicably fails to look at these same characteristics to see how often they succeed in the general population of companies. If these characteristics work 100 percent of the time, you really have something. If they work 5 percent of the time, then not too much is proven.
How were the 11 study companies selected? The criteria take pages to explain in an appendix. Let me simplify by saying that their stock price growth had to be in a range from somewhat lower than to not much higher than the market averages for 15 years. Then, in the next 15 years the stocks had to soar versus the market averages and comparison companies while remaining independent. That's hard to do. The selected companies are Abbott Laboratories, Circuit City, Fannie Mae, Gillette, Kimberly-Clark, Kroger, Nucor, Philip Morris, Pitney Bowes, Walgreen, and Wells Fargo.
As to the "how," attention was focused on what happened before and during the transition from average performance to high performance. Interviews, quantitative analyses, and business press reports were studied. Clearly, there's a tendency to see things a little bit with 20-20 hindsight in such a situation. Since this study started in 1996, it was dealing with facts that were already quite old while they were being examined. Bias is likely.
The key conclusions as to "how" included the following:
(1) a series of CEOs (promoted from within) who combined "personal humility and professional will" focused on making a great company;
(2) an initial focus on eliminating weak people, adding top performing ones, and establishing a culture of top talent putting out extraordinary effort;
(3) then shifting attention to staring at and thinking unceasingly about the hardest facts about the company's situation;
(4) using facts to develop a simple concept that is iteratively reconsidered to focus action on improving performance;
(5) establishing and maintaining a corporate culture of discipline built around commitments, with freedom about how to meet those promises;
(6) using technology to accelerate progress when it fits the company's concept of what it wants to become; and
(7) the company builds momentum from consistent efforts behind its concept that are reinforced by success.
Then, a connection is made to how these 7 conditions can provide the foundation for establishing a Built to Last type of company that can outperform the competition over many decades.
One potential criticism of the study is that its conclusions could be dated. Former Stanford professor Collins argues that he has uncovered basic facts about human organizations that will be unchanging.
I compared the conclusions in this book with my own studies of top performing CEOs and companies in the 1988-2001 time period. I noticed two major differences that suggest a shift in "best practice" standards. First, those who outperform now have developed processes that create major improvements in their operating business models every 2-5 years. Second, senior management development is focused around improving a culture for defining and implementing such improvements. I suspect that item (4) above was an embryonic predecessor to these new dimensions, which occur much more frequently now than in this study.
Next, I compared the list of 7 items to what I had observed in companies. The biggest point that hit me is how few CEOs have been interested in creating long-term outperformance that lasts past their own tenure in an industry. You also have to be a CEO for a long time with that focus before you have a chance to make a lasting impact. Founders have a special advantage here. Perpetuating outperformance may help fill a psychological need for immortality that fits with founders especially well.
Finally, I thought about what I knew about the companies studied from personal contacts during the study years. My sense is that their stories are far more complex than is captured here. So, I think the data have probably been "scrunched" to fit together in some cases. In particular, I wonder whether these companies will greatly outperform in the next 15 years. In many cases, they expanded to meet an unfilled need that is now largely fulfilled. Can they develop a new concept for (4) that will carry them forward as successfully in the future? My guess is that most will not. If that turns out to be the case, we must conclude that the items on this list may be necessary . . . but may not be sufficient to go permanently from good to great. Time will tell.
Before closing, let me observe that if the research team had also looked at the rate by which their principles succeeded among companies that employed them, this would have been one of the very finest research studies on best practices that I have seen. A book like this will provoke much discussion and thought for years to come. Perhaps that information can be included in a future edition or printing. Then, we will have something magnificent to consider!
Do you want to be the best permanently? Why? Or, why not? Mr. Collins points out that it probably takes no more effort, but a lot more discipline and focus.
Read more
Most helpful critical review
See all 267 critical reviews›
692 of 808 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 starsNeither Good Nor Great
ByJamie Madiganon July 30, 2008
This book by Jim Collins is one of the most successful books to be found in the "Business" section of your local megabookstore, and given how it purports to tell you how to take a merely good company and make it great, it's not difficult to see why that might be so. Collins and his crack team of researchers say they swam through stacks of business literature in search of info on how to pull this feat off, and came up with a list of great companies that illustrate some concepts central to the puzzle. They also present for each great company what they call a "comparison company," which is kind of that company with a goatee and a much less impressive earnings record. The balance of the book is spent expanding on pithy catch phrases that describe the great companies, like "First Who, Then What" or "Be a Hedgehog" or "Grasp the Flywheel, not the Doom Loop." No, no, I'm totally serious.

I've got several problems with this book, the biggest of which stem from fundamentally viewpoints on how to do research. Collin's brand of research is not my kind. It's not systematic, it's not replicable, it's not generalizable, it's not systematic, it's not free of bias, it's not model driven, and it's not collaborative. It's not, in short, scientific in any way. That's not to say that other methods of inquiry are without merit --the Harvard Business Review makes pretty darn good use of case studies, for example-- but way too often Collins's great truths seemed like square pegs crammed into round holes, because a round hole is what he wants. For example, there's no reported search for information that disconfirms his hypotheses. Are there other companies that don't make use of a Culture of Discipline (Chapter 6, natch) but yet are still great according to Collins's definition? Are there great companies that fail to do some of the things he says should make them great? The way that the book focuses strictly on pairs of great/comparison companies smacks of confirmatory information bias, which is a kink in the human mind that drives us to seek out and pay attention to information that confirms our pre-existing suppositions and ignore information that fails to support them.

Relatedly, a lot of the book's themes and platitudes strike me as owing their popularity to the same factors that make the horoscope or certain personality tests like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator so popular: they're so general and loosely defined that almost anyone can look at that and not only say that wow, that make sense, and I've always felt the same way! This guy and me? We're geniuses! The chapter about "getting the right people on the bus" that extols the virtue of hiring really super people is perhaps the most obvious example. Really, did anyone read this part and think "Oh, man. I've been hiring half retarded chimps. THAT'S my problem! I should hire GOOD people!" Probably not, and given that Collins doesn't go into any detail about HOW to do this or any of his other good to great pro tips, I'm not really sure where the value is supposed to be.

It also irked me that Good to Great seems to try and exist in a vacuum, failing to relate its findings to any other body of research except Collins's other book, Built to Last. The most egregious example of this is early on in Chapter 2 where Collins talks about his concept of "Level 5 Leadership," which characterizes those very special folks who perch atop a supposed leadership hierarchy. The author actually goes into some detail describing Level 5 leaders, but toward the end of the chapter he just shrugs his figurative shoulders and says "But we don't know how people get to be better leaders. Some people just are." Wait, what? People in fields like Industrial-Organizational Psychology and Organizational Development have been studying, scientifically, what great leaders do and how to do it for decades. We know TONS about how to become a better leader. There are entire industries built around it. You would think that somebody on the Good to Great research team may have done a cursory Google search on this.

So while Good to Great does have some interesting thoughts and a handful of amusing or even fascinating stories to tell about the companies it profiles (I liked, for example, learning about why Walgreens opens so many shops in the same area, even to the point of having stores across the street from each other in some cities), ultimately it strikes me as vague generalities and little to no practical information about how to actually DO anything to make your company great.
Read more
Sort by:
Most helpful
Filter by:
All reviewers
All stars
All formats
Search
682 of 771 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 starsRare Pathways to Exceptionally Increased Prosperity
ByDonald MitchellHALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon October 16, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This study was stimulated by Mr. Bill Meehan's (head of McKinsey in San Francisco) observation that Built to Last wasn't very helpful to companies, because the firms studied had always been great. Most companies have been good, and never great. What should these firms do?
Jim Collins and his team have done an enormous amount of interesting work to determine whether a good company can be come a great company, and how. The answer to the former question is "yes," assuming that the 11 of 1435 Fortune 500 companies did not make it there by accident. The answer to the latter is less clear. The study group identified a number of characteristics that their 11 companies had in common, which were much less frequently present in comparison companies. However, the study inexplicably fails to look at these same characteristics to see how often they succeed in the general population of companies. If these characteristics work 100 percent of the time, you really have something. If they work 5 percent of the time, then not too much is proven.
How were the 11 study companies selected? The criteria take pages to explain in an appendix. Let me simplify by saying that their stock price growth had to be in a range from somewhat lower than to not much higher than the market averages for 15 years. Then, in the next 15 years the stocks had to soar versus the market averages and comparison companies while remaining independent. That's hard to do. The selected companies are Abbott Laboratories, Circuit City, Fannie Mae, Gillette, Kimberly-Clark, Kroger, Nucor, Philip Morris, Pitney Bowes, Walgreen, and Wells Fargo.
As to the "how," attention was focused on what happened before and during the transition from average performance to high performance. Interviews, quantitative analyses, and business press reports were studied. Clearly, there's a tendency to see things a little bit with 20-20 hindsight in such a situation. Since this study started in 1996, it was dealing with facts that were already quite old while they were being examined. Bias is likely.
The key conclusions as to "how" included the following:
(1) a series of CEOs (promoted from within) who combined "personal humility and professional will" focused on making a great company;
(2) an initial focus on eliminating weak people, adding top performing ones, and establishing a culture of top talent putting out extraordinary effort;
(3) then shifting attention to staring at and thinking unceasingly about the hardest facts about the company's situation;
(4) using facts to develop a simple concept that is iteratively reconsidered to focus action on improving performance;
(5) establishing and maintaining a corporate culture of discipline built around commitments, with freedom about how to meet those promises;
(6) using technology to accelerate progress when it fits the company's concept of what it wants to become; and
(7) the company builds momentum from consistent efforts behind its concept that are reinforced by success.
Then, a connection is made to how these 7 conditions can provide the foundation for establishing a Built to Last type of company that can outperform the competition over many decades.
One potential criticism of the study is that its conclusions could be dated. Former Stanford professor Collins argues that he has uncovered basic facts about human organizations that will be unchanging.
I compared the conclusions in this book with my own studies of top performing CEOs and companies in the 1988-2001 time period. I noticed two major differences that suggest a shift in "best practice" standards. First, those who outperform now have developed processes that create major improvements in their operating business models every 2-5 years. Second, senior management development is focused around improving a culture for defining and implementing such improvements. I suspect that item (4) above was an embryonic predecessor to these new dimensions, which occur much more frequently now than in this study.
Next, I compared the list of 7 items to what I had observed in companies. The biggest point that hit me is how few CEOs have been interested in creating long-term outperformance that lasts past their own tenure in an industry. You also have to be a CEO for a long time with that focus before you have a chance to make a lasting impact. Founders have a special advantage here. Perpetuating outperformance may help fill a psychological need for immortality that fits with founders especially well.
Finally, I thought about what I knew about the companies studied from personal contacts during the study years. My sense is that their stories are far more complex than is captured here. So, I think the data have probably been "scrunched" to fit together in some cases. In particular, I wonder whether these companies will greatly outperform in the next 15 years. In many cases, they expanded to meet an unfilled need that is now largely fulfilled. Can they develop a new concept for (4) that will carry them forward as successfully in the future? My guess is that most will not. If that turns out to be the case, we must conclude that the items on this list may be necessary . . . but may not be sufficient to go permanently from good to great. Time will tell.
Before closing, let me observe that if the research team had also looked at the rate by which their principles succeeded among companies that employed them, this would have been one of the very finest research studies on best practices that I have seen. A book like this will provoke much discussion and thought for years to come. Perhaps that information can be included in a future edition or printing. Then, we will have something magnificent to consider!
Do you want to be the best permanently? Why? Or, why not? Mr. Collins points out that it probably takes no more effort, but a lot more discipline and focus.
10 commentsWas this review helpful to you?
Yes
No
Report abuse
692 of 808 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 starsNeither Good Nor Great
ByJamie Madiganon July 30, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book by Jim Collins is one of the most successful books to be found in the "Business" section of your local megabookstore, and given how it purports to tell you how to take a merely good company and make it great, it's not difficult to see why that might be so. Collins and his crack team of researchers say they swam through stacks of business literature in search of info on how to pull this feat off, and came up with a list of great companies that illustrate some concepts central to the puzzle. They also present for each great company what they call a "comparison company," which is kind of that company with a goatee and a much less impressive earnings record. The balance of the book is spent expanding on pithy catch phrases that describe the great companies, like "First Who, Then What" or "Be a Hedgehog" or "Grasp the Flywheel, not the Doom Loop." No, no, I'm totally serious.

I've got several problems with this book, the biggest of which stem from fundamentally viewpoints on how to do research. Collin's brand of research is not my kind. It's not systematic, it's not replicable, it's not generalizable, it's not systematic, it's not free of bias, it's not model driven, and it's not collaborative. It's not, in short, scientific in any way. That's not to say that other methods of inquiry are without merit --the Harvard Business Review makes pretty darn good use of case studies, for example-- but way too often Collins's great truths seemed like square pegs crammed into round holes, because a round hole is what he wants. For example, there's no reported search for information that disconfirms his hypotheses. Are there other companies that don't make use of a Culture of Discipline (Chapter 6, natch) but yet are still great according to Collins's definition? Are there great companies that fail to do some of the things he says should make them great? The way that the book focuses strictly on pairs of great/comparison companies smacks of confirmatory information bias, which is a kink in the human mind that drives us to seek out and pay attention to information that confirms our pre-existing suppositions and ignore information that fails to support them.

Relatedly, a lot of the book's themes and platitudes strike me as owing their popularity to the same factors that make the horoscope or certain personality tests like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator so popular: they're so general and loosely defined that almost anyone can look at that and not only say that wow, that make sense, and I've always felt the same way! This guy and me? We're geniuses! The chapter about "getting the right people on the bus" that extols the virtue of hiring really super people is perhaps the most obvious example. Really, did anyone read this part and think "Oh, man. I've been hiring half retarded chimps. THAT'S my problem! I should hire GOOD people!" Probably not, and given that Collins doesn't go into any detail about HOW to do this or any of his other good to great pro tips, I'm not really sure where the value is supposed to be.

It also irked me that Good to Great seems to try and exist in a vacuum, failing to relate its findings to any other body of research except Collins's other book, Built to Last. The most egregious example of this is early on in Chapter 2 where Collins talks about his concept of "Level 5 Leadership," which characterizes those very special folks who perch atop a supposed leadership hierarchy. The author actually goes into some detail describing Level 5 leaders, but toward the end of the chapter he just shrugs his figurative shoulders and says "But we don't know how people get to be better leaders. Some people just are." Wait, what? People in fields like Industrial-Organizational Psychology and Organizational Development have been studying, scientifically, what great leaders do and how to do it for decades. We know TONS about how to become a better leader. There are entire industries built around it. You would think that somebody on the Good to Great research team may have done a cursory Google search on this.

So while Good to Great does have some interesting thoughts and a handful of amusing or even fascinating stories to tell about the companies it profiles (I liked, for example, learning about why Walgreens opens so many shops in the same area, even to the point of having stores across the street from each other in some cities), ultimately it strikes me as vague generalities and little to no practical information about how to actually DO anything to make your company great.
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?
Yes
No
Report abuse
116 of 132 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 starsGood to Great + consistent Optimal Thinking = Best
ByA customeron April 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book is a fascinating read! A study taken over five years began with twenty-eight corporations and revealed eleven that had made the leap from Good to Great. From this study, I gained an instant understanding of the role of humility in leadership. The primary ambition of great leaders is focused on the success of their company, not on themselves.
Collins advocates the Hedgehog Concept - a combination of discovering what you can be best in the world at (Optimal Thinking), what you are passionate about, and what drives your economic engine. Collins states that sustained disciplined action is primarily achieved by "fanatical adherence to the Hedgehog Concept and the willingness to shun opportunities that fall outside the three circles." So my question is: How do you identify the best? I recommend Optimal Thinking: How To Be Your Best Self by Dr. Rosalene Glickman as an adjunct to this powerful book to provide the mental resource to identify the best, optimize emotional and financial intelligence and create a corporate culture of optimization. From Good to Greatest to Best!"
CommentWas this review helpful to you?
Yes
No
Report abuse
89 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 starsUnwavering resolve to do what must be done
ByA customeron May 21, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Unwavering resolve to do what must be done! Ah -- a characteristic of the Level 5 (Good to Great) leader, described in this well researched book that shows the reader what it takes to take a good company to greatness. Personal humility fortified with professional will gives Good to Great leaders the edge on their ego-driven counterparts. Collins makes many marvellous points, the first being that the RIGHT people are your most important asset. By rising above unrealistic optimism, confronting brutal facts and asking questions that lead to the greatest insights (optimal thinking), the leader moves his company to greatness. Good to Great leaders focus on the few things that have the greatest impact (optimal thinking). Collins won me when he said "One of the primary ways to de-motivate people is to ignore the brutal facts of reality." Good to Great leaders create a culture where the truth is heard, and where negative thinking is not degraded or scorned (optimal thinking). This book is a must read!
CommentWas this review helpful to you?
Yes
No
Report abuse
164 of 190 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 starsEleven Enduring Great Companies: 15 Years from 1998 to 2013
ByESon June 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover
"Good to Great" introduces readers to the concept of an enduring great company, one that sustains tremendous growth for at least 15 years from the so called "turning point".

Published in 2001, the book gives us a great opportunity to analyze how much endurance there is in a great enduring company.

Since many of the graphs in the book end in 1998, let's see how the eleven example companies listed in the book did in the next 15 years, from 1998 to 2013.

If a convinced reader of the book bought $1 worth of stock of each company back in 1998, the total return on the portfolio in 2013 would be $19.72.

In comparison, the Dow Jones went from 8,000 to 15,000, so the return on investment of $11 in general market would be $20.62.

It turns out, on average, the "great enduring companies" performed slightly worse than general market in the next 15 years after their big sustained successes.

After the author's praise to the great management teams at the companies which target for sustained long-term growth and build a lasting corporate culture to support the growth, these results are disappointing. In the timelines presented in book, the same portfolio does 8x better than the general market, not 5% worse.

Conclusion: The book is well-written and full of interesting notions and quotes. But its main value today is seeing what happened next to superstar companies scientifically and elaborately picked as examples by a group led by a Stanford scholar. There is no way around a feeling that even these highly educated individuals fell under the spell of success and started to find patterns and laws where there were none. One thing is clear though - the subsequent failures of the great enduring companies can be explained in another book, based on an even better scientific study.

--- Data

I have put together a list of company name, stock price in 1998, stock price in 2013 and calculated returns on investing $1 in the companies' stock for that period.


Report abuse
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 starsONE PERSPECTIVE ONLY
ByNearly Nubileon July 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This fluently written book aims to offer insight into what makes the top companies tick and reach that level above and beyond being simply "good". Eleven such superstar companies are singled out according to 5 years worth of research -- Abbot Labs, Circuit City, Fannie Mae, Gillette, Kimberly-Clark, Kroger, Nucor, Philip Morris, Pitney Bowes, Walgreens, and Wells Fargo -- on the basis of 15-year stock returns.
Which is one metric. It may be instructive to note that Gillette, one of the Great firms, is trading at the same stock price as it was in 1995, and went through a pretty lame patch of 4-5 years just recently until it was saved by a doyen CEO. Wells Fargo, despite its Norwest acquisition still remains no.5 in its category.
We are offered the following insights about most effective leaders:
- Best leaders are not high profile folk but subdued, humble yet focused people who get results. Sure, but same could also be said of the oppposite personality. Examples of vivacious/outspoken yet successful CEOs abound: Lee Iacocca, Steve Jobs, Larry Ellison, Jack Welch etc.
- Great leaders are supposed to believe in teamwork (Nokia's boss, Jorma Ollila, and his preachings of putting teamwork before individual effort are cited). Excuse me if this hackneyed mantra fails to tickle my fancies.
Apart from the above insightful analysis, we are taken through a whole text of redundant spin on how companies need to focus on their "key profitability ratio" and hone it down to succeed. Advice of this nature that asks companies to focus sounds quite ordinary and unimaginative, so a parable from Aesop's Fables is thrown in -- the "HedgeHog versus Fox" -- a hedgehog knows ONE thing well and excels at it, while a fox runs around seeking many targets but never learns. We should of course be like the hedgehog.
Firstly, this swansong of "focus" is painfully cliche. Secondly, it assumes that business context is stagnant, which is anything but the reality. What happens when Kentucky Fried Chicken runs out of favor with a populace that is becoming health conscious? Or, what happens when a new generation requires MORE than one type of jeans? (This put Levis into its deep market share woes as recently as the late 90s while Lee Cooper and Calvin Klein made significant inroads into the teen denim markets, Levis was caught sleeping with its errant strategy to focus on its 501s).
I have difficulty believing that the book stands up to all its rave reviews. At best, this is just ONE perspective about SOME companies based on ONE statistic, the data for which were collected and analyzed POST-HOC (known as "posthoc bias" to those in the know). If you are expecting to come away with any pearls of wisdom about effective leadership or corporate success, you may be disappointed.
CommentWas this review helpful to you?
Yes
No
Report abuse
160 of 187 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 starsA book for the ages! Excellent for managers and start-ups
ByDan E. Rosson October 23, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Jim Collins, co-author of Built To Last, has done it again! This time he spent 5 years trying to find out what differentiates good companies from great companies. This study can be applied to entrepreneurial ventures and to current corporate America. After reading this book you may see your company from a much different perspective than in the past and it may have you thinking about the effectiveness of senior managers within your company. I believe it is a book that business executives will read and keep handy for reference.
This book is a study of companies that exceed their industry, the overall stock market and produce PHENOMENAL returns over a 15-year period (15 of them are very "normal" years and the next 15 years are full of explosive growth). Some key points you will take away from this book include:
1) Growth in most companies came after years and years of trying to adapt / mold a concept into something the company truly believed in. Once this happened the growth engine got going.
2) Great managers worry more about getting the right people on board and the wrong people off board BEFORE they establish a corporate stategy.
3) Most great CEOs came from within their own ranks and weren't recruited from the outside.
4) Executive compensation didn't appear to be a key driver of corporate performance
5) The respective great companies exceeded the overall stock market in creating shareholder value by at least 3x during their 15 year run measured (some for many more years). While some may say this is not much think about the steel industry and how many are filing for bankruptcy. Nucor Steel still managed to beat the S&P by more than 3x.
6) The great companies in this book blew away their comparable peer group. Wells Fargo vs. Bank of America, Kroger vs. other grocery chains, Walgreens vs. Eckerd, etc.
7) Collins describes a Level 5 leader. After reading this section I was amazed at how many CEOs I recognized as not being Level 5 leaders. This may, in the near future, shake up executive compensation plans, CEO searches and potentially affect corporate governance.
8) Technology accelerated a transformation but was regarded as a tool. It didn't define the company.
9) M&A activity played virtually no role in going from good to great.
That is all I will write about the book. I could write on and on about how good this book is. Read it. It will change the way you think about business. Other very good books on the principles of business and entrepreneurship are Leading at the Speed of Growth by Catlin and Mathews and The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing by Jack Trout and Al Ries.
sarah daniel
 
Jan 11, 2016

Bad Sessions

I experienced bad things. It may sound obvious, but you can't generate good reviews (at least not legally) unless you have happy customers to write them. "No amount of asking for user reviews or soliciting feedback will help compensate for a bad first impression," notes Jason Arango, internet marketing strategist for Think Basis, an internet marketing firm. Start by making sure to resolve any issues that particularly bother your customers if you possibly can.



Consider asking for reviews. Not good reviews -- just reviews, and not until the end of the transaction. "You don't want to be pushy, but after you've delivered a service or product, it makes sense to ask that they review it on Yelp, for instance," Arango says. "Let them know that the company takes their opinions seriously and checks that feedback daily.
"If your customers are under 30, encouraging them to post a review may turn them off," Pogorzelski says. Instead, simply engage them in the online world, by creating a Facebook group and Twitter account for your business. He adds that customers in this age bracket are so accustomed to posting online about every experience they have, they will almost certainly share their thoughts about your product or service without any prompting.
Resist the urge to defend your company, product, or employee, an approach that almost always makes things worse. "The key is not to fire back at the customer, the key is to examine the problem and resolve it," Pogorzelski says. "Also, if a bad review is warranted, thank the customer for the review and apologize for the bad experience. We find a customer will often go back and update a negative review once the issue has been resolved, so you can turn a negative into a positive if you act quickly."
Reach out to negative reviewers directly. Not everyone recommends responding publicly to bad reviews. PacketTrap never responds online to negative reviews, because even doing that much tends to put the company in a defensive position, Goodman says. Instead the company contacts negative reviewers directly if it can find them, and tries to resolve the issue. "If it's thoughtful, constructive feedback, we may offer an extension of a free trial or a free upgrade," Goodman says.
Remember, it's a numbers game. The more reviews you get, the more likely you are to get one or more bad reviews. Even if you are providing the best product or service you can, some people will tend to complain. So your goal should be a large number of mostly good reviews. "If we get 10 reviews, seven good ones and three bad ones, that's a lot better for us than one review," Goodman notes.
Make reviewing as easy as possible. "Our product has a 'give feedback' button that users encounter at the end of the process,"Goodman says. "The user has three choices: one to send us feedback, one to suggest a new feature, and one that sends them to a review site. We did that hoping they would mostly write positive reviews, and that's how it's worked out."Golden FlubsThe award winners at the 2016 Golden Globes have made numerous speeches during their careers--but they're not immune to mistakes. Here are the high and low points from the ceremony.Acknowledge your competitorsThe first award winner of the night, Jobs actress Kate Winslet began her acceptance speech for best supporting actress in a motion picture by thanking her fellow nominees. "This category is so crowded...and I feel more honored to be included than ever."Don't forget to pauseIn her speech for winning best supporting actress in a TV series, movie, or limited series for The Affair, Maura Tierney committed a classic public speaking sin, using the phrase "uh" or "um" more than 20 times in less than two minutes.
Don't ignore your cue to exitWolf Hall executive producer Paul Weitz had a lot to say after his show won the award for best limited TV series or movie. He ignored the music signaling that it was time to exit the stage.
Know your audienceGolden Globes host Ricky Gervais set out to be controversial, but not every joke generated a lot of laughs. Many TV critics criticized Gervais for relying too heavily on transgender jokes.

Fact-check your speechDirector Quentin Tarantino accepted an award for composer Ennio Morricone. He noted that this was the first American award Morricone had ever won. The only problem was that Morricone had won at the Golden Globes before--twice.

Don't forget to thank key playersSylvester Stallone left the stage after winning best supporting actor, motion picture in Creed without thanking the film's other star, Michael B. Jordan, or director Ryan Coogler.

Use props wiselyAfter presenters announced actress Taraji P. Henson won best actress in a TV drama, she handed out cookies to the other people at her table. The reason: she won the award for her portrayal of "Cookie Lyons" on the TV show Empire.

Know what kind of preparation works best for youBefore his acceptance speech, The Martian director Ridley Scott said,"I’ve prepared some kind of speech...because otherwise I ramble," he said, although he still went over his time limit.

6 Weird GadgetsThese products were shown at the CES tech conference in Las Vegas last week. They are unusual but also useful--and might see the light of day or even show up at Best Buy soon.
IMAGE: WAYNE STENDER
sarah daniel
 
Jan 10, 2016

bad after services

I visited the clinic many times. A review is an evaluation of a publication, service, or company such as a movie (a movie review), video game (video game review), musical composition (music review of a composition or recording), book (book review); a piece of hardware like a car, home appliance, or computer; or an event or performance, such as a live music concert, play, musical theater show, dance show, or art exhibition. In addition to a critical evaluation, the review's author may assign the work a rating to indicate its relative merit. More loosely, an author may review current events, trends, or items in the news. A compilation of reviews may itself be called a review. The New York Review of Books, for instance, is a collection of essays on literature, culture, and current affairs. National Review, founded by William F. Buckley, Jr.,[1] is an influential conservative magazine, and Monthly Review is a long-running socialist periodical.
A user review refers to a review written by a user or consumer for a product or a service based on her experience as a user of the reviewed product. Popular sources for consumer reviews are e-commerce sites like Amazon or Zappos, and social media sites like TripAdvisor and Yelp. E-commerce sites often have consumer reviews for products and sellers separately. Usually, consumer reviews are in the form of several lines of texts accompanied by a numerical rating. This text is meant to aid in shopping decision of a prospective buyer. A consumer review of a product usually comments on how well the product measures up to expectations based on the specifications provided by the manufacturer or seller. It talks about performance, reliability, quality defects, if any, and value for money. Consumer review, also called 'word of mouth' and 'user generated content' differs from 'marketer generated content' in its evaluation from consumer or user point of view. Often it includes comparative evaluations against competing products. Observations are factual as well as subjective in nature. Consumer review of sellers usually comment on service experienced, and dependability or trustworthiness of the seller. Usually, it comments on factors such as timeliness of delivery, packaging and correctness of delivered items, shipping charges, return services against promises made, and so on.

Consumer reviews online have become a major factor in business reputation and brand image due to the popularity of TripAdvisor, Yelp and online review websites. A negative review can damage the reputation of a business and this has created a new industry of reputation management where companies attempt to remove or hide bad reviews so that more favourable content is found when potential customers do research.[4]

An expert review usually refers to a review written by someone who has tested several peer products or services to identify which offers the best value for money or the best set of features. A bought review is the system where the creator (usually a company) of a new product pays a reviewer to review his new product.
A book review (or book report) is a form of criticism in which a book is analyzed based on content, style, and merit. It is often carried out in periodicals, as school work, or online. Its length may vary from a single paragraph to a substantial essay. In the case of a work of poetry or fiction, or of nonfiction in which the literary merits of the work are an important element, a review will commonly use the methods of literary criticism. Such a review often contains evaluations of the book on the basis of personal taste. Reviewers, in literary periodicals, often use the occasion of a book review for a display of learning or to promulgate their own ideas on the topic of a fiction or non-fiction work. At the other end of the spectrum, some book reviews resemble simple plot summaries. Reviews of non-fiction works intended for instructional or informational purposes may focus more directly on concerns such as practical usefulness and reader-friendliness.

Music reviews[edit]
Performance reviews[edit]
Reviews of live music performances are typically short articles that tell readers about the performers or group(s) that were involved and the pieces or songs that were performed. The comments made by reviewers fall, roughly into two categories: technical comments and subjective/artistic comments. The elements in the "technical" category include rhythmic "togetherness", intonation, errors or slip-ups, and so on. These elements are fairly "black and white"; a pianist playing a concerto either played the right notes on a climactic scale run, or she missed it. The subjective comments refer to elements which are a matter of taste. The balance between the different elements in a review (information about the performer or group; information about the pieces/songs; commentary about the technical and subjective elements of the performance) depends on the audience that a music critic is writing for. Music reviewers writing in local newspapers or general-interest magazines may not be able to assume that the readers will be familiar with music performers and pieces/songs, so they may decide to include a great deal of "background" information.
sarah daniel
 
Jan 6, 2016

bad products

Seniors are willing to teach . Good exposure to various products being manufactured and assembled. Wonderful experience with a lot to learn.
The factory has uneasy work timings with the first shift starting at 6 a.m. The meal timings are weird. Also, transportation for interns are not provided.
Regulate the work timings to make it better. Please provide transport facilities for the interns and project students.Pros
Learning opportunity, flexibility, freedom, friendly environment
Working hours are long and Remote location posting
Advice to Management
Follow 5 day culture or or reduce working hours in week

bad products

MdZaid
 
Jan 6, 2016

bad services

Services like PeopleWise provide financial history in their background checks, which comes into play especially when you are looking into a new business partner or to invest in a new company. This information could potentially help you avoid being a victim of fraud by uncovering a hidden bankruptcy, unpaid liens or past lawsuits. Not all companies offer financial information in their reports, so if that's the kind of detail you need, it's important to make sure it is available before purchasing a background check report.
Background Check Services: Our Verdict and Recommendations

Before choosing which background check service to use, focus on deciding what kind of information you want to know. Our top three picks are the best at providing you with accurate information across the board. Intelius is especially useful for its comprehensive reports, while US Search allows you to view reports for a full year after purchasing. BeenVerified excels at provided very accurate financial information.

However, our lineup also includes companies that offer background check reports with unique kinds of information, even if they don't all rank among the top three. For example, of the services we ranked, only PeopleSmart and Intelius provide available marriage and divorce records. Also worth noting is Instant Checkmate, which provides public information that is available on social media profiles in its reports. Such data isn't available through many of the services we reviewed.
MdZaid
 
Jan 6, 2016

Bad clinic experience

Background check services can help you learn a lot about someone. Whether you're wondering about the financial history of a potential new business partner or the criminal record of your blind date, it's important to understand how background check services work before you use them. The information contained in background checks comes from a variety of different public sources, including county clerk's offices, courthouses and social media sites. You could take the time to find this information yourself, but the process is time consuming and can get frustrating. Using background check services makes the process quick and efficient, so you don't have to spend the time tracking downs bits and pieces of the information you want.

Because background check services give you reports based on public records, it's important to remember that some of the information may seem outdated. However, recognize that the information might be the most updated data available.

The services we reviewed can provide extensive background checks on people, including criminal and financial history. However, if you are simply looking to access basic personal information, people search services may better suit your needs. A good people search service gives you information that includes data such as names, aliases and previous addresses. For more information, check out our articles on background check services.
How to Legally Use Background Checks

The U.S. Fair Credit Reporting Act restricts the way you can use the information you obtain from background check services. If you want to screen potential employees or tenants – or if you are screening for medical, credit or insurance purposes – you must use a consumer reporting agency or employment screening service. These agencies have to follow specific guidelines for protecting data and include processes that allow the subject of the background check to resolve disputes. If you use information from a background check service to reject a potential employee or tenant, you may find yourself in legal trouble.
Background Check Services: What We Tested, What We Found

When we evaluated background check companies, we found it essential to test their services on real people so we could verify the accuracy of the results. We focused on finding people from different backgrounds, including those with criminal records, and we tested these services on average citizens who do not actively hide their information, as well as on those who actively try to keep their information private. We purchased background check reports from each of the services in our lineup in order to evaluate them. The companies had no input or influence on our testing, and they were not provided with any results of our testing before publication.

Most of the companies we reviewed have different packages you can purchase when you want an online background check. We focused our testing on reports labeled specifically as background checks. These are comprehensive reports about the person you are researching, and they generally include personal information, criminal history and financial history. We also considered the availability of nationwide and statewide criminal background checks – offered as separate services – which differ from background checks in that they only provide personal information and criminal records.

Because the primary purpose of background checks is to gather information, we centered our attention on the variety of information available through the services. In our rankings, we also seriously considered how accurate these reports were, based on the information provided by our test subjects. The different methods of searching and the services' ease of use were factors in our ranking, as well. With these categories in mind, we split our evaluation into four main sections: Report Information, Search Customization, Ease of Use and Help & Support.

Report Information: Accuracy Matters Most
Accurate information from a background check service is important, whether you're finding a nanny for your kids or investigating someone you met online. The best background check services provide personal information, criminal records, sex offender registries and financial history. Accuracy in these fields could potentially help you avoid being a victim of fraud or help you avoid potentially dangerous or criminal situations.

We derived our accuracy score by taking the information our test subjects provided to us and comparing it to the information the background checks gave us. When data didn't match up to the information we had, we deducted points from the accuracy score.

Because the information provided on background check services is gathered through public records, there is always a chance that data will be missed or misrepresented. This is one reason it's especially important to purchase reports from companies that have high accuracy rates because then you have the best chance of receiving the most correct information about someone. With companies like Intelius and US Search, you can receive highly accurate information in a short amount of time.

Search Customization: Multiple Search Options Produce Better Results
Sometimes you want to know more about someone you've just met, but you don't have very much information about them. The best background check services include a variety of different search options so you can search based on small bits of information, such as name, location, address, phone number and age or date of birth. PeopleWise offers the widest variety of search options for full background reports, even including a way for you to search with a phone number. All the services we reviewed also offer a nationwide search option, which is useful if you don't know exactly where your subject has lived or is currently living.

Another essential aspect of searching for people is a preview option. The best background check services allow you to preview some identifying information of potential matches before you actually purchase a report. This is especially useful for names that are common, like Jones or Brown, because there could be various people who share the same name as your subject. This is one reason it's important to have some bits of information beyond a name, such as previous places of residence or close relatives, that can help you choose the right person for the report.

Ease of Use: Definitions Help You Understand Reports
You can expect all of the services to have a central dashboard that gives you access to all the reports you've purchased from the company. The best background check services provide additional information on their dashboards, such as definitions for terms you might not understand or reasons why certain information isn't shown. For example, in our testing we found that some information was only available for certain time periods or from specific states. This additional information can help you better navigate and understand the reports you have purchased.

Not all background check services provide this additional information, but we were particularly impressed with PeopleFinders' definitions. This service also provides you reasons why certain information isn't included in the reports.

Another important aspect in the Ease of Use category is the ability to search based on only one piece of information. Services with a single-search option allow you to search for a person with single pieces of information, typically a last name. The companies that don't have a single-search option will require more information from you.

Help & Support: Look for Companies Offering Helpful Phone Support
The best background check services provide a combination of support channels, including phone support, email support and online FAQs. We included live chat in our considerations as well, but while it is helpful for navigating the website, it is not necessary for a good customer experience. In all our interactions with the companies we reviewed, we found phone support to be the most helpful for finding reports or asking about billing concerns. We were able to get direct and immediate support from representatives over the phone, where email support took longer to help. We were very impressed with the support we received from US Search because of their promptness and professionalism during our interaction with them.
More Important Considerations for Background Check Services

While the features we looked at above are among the most important to keep in mind when you're choosing a background check service, some others are worth consideration depending on what you want from your background check report.

Some services, such as BeenVerified, include social media profiles in their background checks. Some people are very open about their lives on the internet, especially since social media makes it so easy to share personal details. Seeing how someone acts online can be add significantly to a background check. However, remember that many people choose to make their social media profiles private. Private profile data will not show up in any background report.
Esethi
 
Dec 2, 2015

Didn't give complete sessions

I signed for 8 sittings for laser hair removal at dermatech defense colony. The whole team here changed and screwed up the whole contract. They have divided these sessions into 3+3+3 body parts instead of per area. Can anybody tell them who goes for 3 laser seasons.
They kept on arguing for 1-1/2 hr in the clinic.. Didn't even offer water. Very bad service ! Please learn from others experience and never pay in advance.
Sanchi Pahwa
 
Sep 22, 2015

Bad after services

I had my face laser for hair removal from GK2 branch but after that i got allergy and small boils on the side of my face and when i contacted them asking for a solution of the same they said the doctor is not available we cant do anything. They have petetic after services and plus they charge so much and do not give you proper facilitities. Also i feel they have hired cheap doctors who do not know anything. I strongly donot recommend clinic detmatech to anyone.
parii 99
 
Sep 19, 2015

ridiculous treatment with ridiculous staff and fake promises and perfect in making black money

Clinic dermatec is ridiculous clinic with ridiculous staff services and and they people are
Perfect in making black money , they never provide correct bills , there all staff are ill mannered and rude , I have gone thru laser treatment for my birth mark treatment at vasant vihar clinic there a fraud lady who sold me this package of about 25000 was not doctor , plus in between of few session my case has became worst and they people treating me as mouse with whom they are doingexperiment as none of their doctor is certain about the result, they people are like let see
and now my case is worst and picture is like this that now I need to go for plastic surgery for my birth mark .
their fake doctor who sold me package promised me that my mark will go in 2 months and now its been 4 month and my case has become worst than what it was initially.
M feeling like to do suicide seriously

I suffered a lot coz of clinic dermatec
and their customer care management is also very poor the fat lady shipra arora who is supposed to client coordinator she is actually client harassment agent who knows how to make client fool and how to harass client
I asked for refund after my distorted case by clinic dermatec she refused to do refund plus she was forcing me to opt services which I dnt need , again this is harrassing , clinic dermatec harassed me a lot . And she was rude and she challenged me to go for legal .
now m going for legal
coz this kind of harassment can not be tolerated
they people wasted my money and my time too
government should ban these type of clinic services as they make people fool and do scams and made so much of black money .
They have no doctors there counseller called themselves doctor which is clear cut case of frogery
I dnt knw how this blog will help
but m writing here wat I feels and I had hone thru
I will never recommend anyone to this ridiculous clinic
Please take this blog as a serious concern coz clinic dermatec ruin my face my money and my time as well plus they people are so rude as they dnt care abt anything all they want is money only
If there is any human who can look into this matter kindly go thru that
and kindly teach them some lesson
So that they will not ruin any girl case and do not fool anybody anymore .


They never provide services on time
they make people so helpless after extracting money from them
and give appointment according to their mood .


Clinic dermatec cheated so many people
Please kindly look into this matter .

this clinic should stop their services and shut down their clinic .

As they are corrupting india and making so many scams day by day . And making black money .

They left their client helpless and depressed .
Himani sharma1991
 
Sep 17, 2015

Face

I had taken laser for removal of pigmenation of ma face . And chemical
Peels. Laser had no effect in my face and peels burnt my face Afterwards. Clinic dermatech should shut down its services . It is a sheer waste of money. I have paid more than 50000 rupees and there is no effect on my face. Worst experience ever !!
Garima Sahai
 
Jul 8, 2015

20 Burns and Increased hair growth

Appalled at the unfathomably bad Lazer I have received at your centre in Defence Colony. I paid for full body lazer in end Jan 2014 and from the very first session I have been burnt several times. At the very session I was burnt at about 9 spots. I was assured this will not happen again, and was told that the cause was the wrong sort of machine for my skin type and that the marks would go away within a few days. Those marks still remain, one and a half years later and I have been burnt several times since then. I have in total about 20 burn marks on my body. I have duly informed the Manager each time this has happened and shared photos. Over and above 20 burns, there has been an unusual growth of hair even in places where earlier I did not have any. This means that not only have I had to suffer burns on various parts of my body and that the treatment has not even achieved the goal of hair-reduction, which was promised to me, and which is on display on all your advertisements but caused the opposite.

Even after this and my staying patient through the process, which was acknowledged by your Clinic staff and them admitting that it is 'our fault', nothing has been done about it. In stead on finally complaining I was told 'how do we know the burns are from here'!
upasana1811
 
Mar 16, 2015

Not Worth Treatment- Clinic Dermatech

Hi
I went to the Rajouri Garden branch for weight loss treatment. I met with counselor. They charged me Rs.22500/- for 15 sessions. But my money wasted, no result found. I asked for the refund of my money. They have changed my sessions into laser and beautytek. Again failed in beautytek treatment. I do not recommend this clinic at all.
manmohananshu
 
Feb 22, 2015

Not Proper Treatment

Hi I went to the GK-2 branch for my skin treatment .I met with Dr.Khan. She is not actually doctor ,she knows how to make fool. They charged 1000 for consultation , when i asked for bill she took so much time and come with discount of 350 rupees.Then she gave me 650 rs bill invoice.
Moutussi
 
Jun 29, 2014

Overcharging, not providing bills

Clinic dermatech is earning lakhs each month but not keeping proper accounts. They refuse to show customers the printed price list for treatments saying it is against competition rules and charge different amounts from different clients for the same treatment depending on their payment capability, whether they are new and whether they are too polite to argue when after the treatment they are told, we put in an additional treatment because it is now a combined package and the single treatment you asked for will not work on your skin. If you repeatedly tell them you want intense pulsed light laser treatment which costs 3000 they will tell you trust us we know what is best for you and later told you they have given you another treatment for 3000 rupees which you were not told about and ipl price has increased just recently. If you argue about all the extra treatments they have forced on you without informing you, they will tell you ok, take six treatments of 6000 rupees (3000 plus3000) and then we will give you a 50 per cent discount and they will take 18000 from you(50 per cent of 6000x6 or rs 36000) and they will not give you the bill for it, they will say the credit card slip itself is the bill, nor will they give you any card saying how many treatments are left, saying, dont worry, everything is in our computer system, trust us, we will call you for the next treatment but they will never call for months you and when you call they will never pick up the phone or tell you all the appointments are booked and they will call you back, and if they call they are only interested in selling you new treatments, if you refuse more treatments, they never give you appointment for the pending treatments, if you barge in forcefully, they will make you wait endlessly, and then hurriedly finish the treatment and do only half the job they did the previous time as they have already taken your money, again they will not give you a bill or list how many treatments are remaining. If you insist they will give you a handwritten bill but not an itemised one listing treatment prices separately, just the total amount. The whole time the laser technician will try to sell you some wonderful creams for post laser treatment and platinum face rejuvenation supposedly from abroad, no prices are listed on the product, company is called ciel, when you go home you find product is not sealed and the cream inside looks as if it has been a cheap ointment dumped in a blob from another bottle, it is not a even new surface like creams in the market, again no bills are provided, a 50 gms product is sometimes charged rs 500 and sometimes rs 1200 or rs 2000, there is no rhyme or reason, when you discover the cream is manufactured by clinic dermatech itself though they have no factory here, they claim they manufacture it here but products are all imported from abroad so they were right in claiming it as a foreign product but refuse to say from where or whom it is bought, it is supposedly a trade secret. After one or two treatments are completed which will take several months as their appointments are not given on time they will lie and say you have completed double the treatments than you actually have and refuse to show you the records on the computer, they will give you only a handwritten card, and you have to accept as they don't provide separate bills for each treatment once they have taken all the money in advance claiming this is the rule if you are given a discount. Since the prices are inflated you actually don't get a discount, then you discover on the net that the treatment they sold you for 3500 rs they are selling online on various sites for 300 and 500 rs vouchers! They claim to have doctors on site who advise you on your skin and force you to go for various treatments but they are not qualified and don't show you the degrees, similarly the laser technicians are not trained to use the lasers, they are underpaid and make the rest of the money from commissions on selling creams, and one doctor supposedly operates on warts but did such a botched job on me that it became a huge sore on my chest and i could not get up for seven days, and i was too afraid to go for the follow up session, it cost 7000 for 2 treatments, she said take painkillers when i called her. similarly the sales people are made to sell more and more treatments so they can make more commissions and sacked if they cant meet targets, their owner vinod rathra is a known scamster who did these unfair trade practices in his other businesses also and forces all his staff in all clinic dermatech branches to practice such fraudulent and aggressive sales techniques. They do not deliver on service and are only interested in selling new treatments, they will keep on harassing you on phone for the same and in the clinic also, there is not a single catalogue in the entire clinic where prices are shown, they will keep on refusing or changing the topic until you feel you are making a scene, then they will offer you combined packages so they dont have to mention individual prices but give you only one laser treatment and also refuse to show you the name of the laser machine as that too not the correct one, as it is occupied for some other client or not working and also treatment is not done for sufficient time, 60 minute treatment is done for 30 minutes as they have sold many more treatments than their actual capacity and have many clients waiting but not enough treatment rooms or lasers to do the job and after making you do the new treatment you just paid for they will send you home saying clinic is closed and staff have left so you have to come back another time for the treatment for which you already paid earlier. Pls audit their accounts, you will find a lot of lacunae, they prefer to take cash rather than cards and treatment prices on their computers are different from bills given to clients. They have damaged the skin of many clients and made it black who co e crying to complain but are sent off with lies as indian dark skin is not suitable for laser but they are forced to undergo it before weddings with false promises and hugely inflated prices as to be wedded brides are desperate and go for honeymoon packages which promises to reduce their dark complexion, weight, face
Lift and body sculpting but they are just made to sweat out excessive water and nothing of real value is done and the girls have no option because they have no time to argue before the wedding. They often lose records and say we cant find your payments online, bring us your old bills or we cant complete the treatments and if you have lost these month-old bills, too bad, it is not our responsibility, we cant see when you have last paid, it is so long back, etc. please send someone undercover to defence colony branch and see their business practices and please raid the home and other property of the owner as well as the clinic dermatech offices, as they have lot of black money concealed. You can check their mobile phones call records, 9717694398 or 9350350849 to see which customers they called and correlate the customers bills in their system compared to what customer actually paid. They have cheated and damaged so many people. Pls treat this matter seriously as they are making so much money.

Complaint Registration Form

    Information of the Company you are complaining about
    Subject of Complaint
    City (optional)
    Complaint Details
    Attach photos (optional)
    Confirmation code

    Submit

         
     

    User Registration

    Already a Complaint Board member? Log in now.
    Username:
    E-mail address:
    Password:
    Code:
    or connect with Facebook

    User Registration

    A confirmation email was sent to "".
    To confirm your account, please click the link in the message.

    If you don't see the email in your Inbox, please check your Spam box.

    User Login

    Not a member of Complaint Board? Register now.
    E-mail address:
    Password:
    Forgot your password?
    E-mail address:
    Back
    Loading, please wait...
    Your password has been sent to the specified email address. Log in
    or connect with Facebook

    User Facebook Login

    Enter Username